12

I have a 3 column layout that should fill the whole screen so on my columns I am using:

width: calc(100% / 3);

So lets say for example my screen is 782px wide:

782 / 3 = 260.66̅

However the problem I have is in Internet Explorer, where it rounds the pixels to two decimal places (260.67)

260.67 * 3 = 782.01

So at certain widths, I lose a 1/3 of my page as it wraps underneath.

Here's an example:

function onResize() {
    $('ul').each(function() {
        var H = eval($(this).height() / $(this).children('li').length);
        $(this).children('li').outerHeight(H);
        $(this).children('li').css('line-height', H + 'px');
        $(this).children('li').outerWidth($(this).width());
    });
}

var timer;
$(window).resize( function() {
    timer && clearTimeout(timer);
    timer = setTimeout(onResize, 100);
});
onResize();
html {
    height:100%;
}
body {
    background:black;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    overflow:hidden;
    height:100%;
}
ul {
    width: calc(100% / 3);
    display: inline-block;
    overflow:hidden;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    float:left;
    height:100%;
    list-style: outside none none;
}
ul li {
    background: rgb(230,240,163);
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0 0, 0 100%, from(rgba(230,240,163,1)), color-stop(0.5, rgba(210,230,56,1)), color-stop(0.51, rgba(195,216,37,1)), to(rgba(219,240,67,1)));
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(rgba(230,240,163,1) 0%, rgba(210,230,56,1) 50%, rgba(195,216,37,1) 51%, rgba(219,240,67,1) 100%);
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(rgba(230,240,163,1) 0%, rgba(210,230,56,1) 50%, rgba(195,216,37,1) 51%, rgba(219,240,67,1) 100%);
    background: -o-linear-gradient(rgba(230,240,163,1) 0%, rgba(210,230,56,1) 50%, rgba(195,216,37,1) 51%, rgba(219,240,67,1) 100%);
    background: linear-gradient(rgba(230,240,163,1) 0%, rgba(210,230,56,1) 50%, rgba(195,216,37,1) 51%, rgba(219,240,67,1) 100%);
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#e6f0a3', endColorstr='#dbf043',GradientType=0 );
    text-align:center;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<ul id="ul1">
    <li>Test 1</li>
    <li>Test 2</li>
</ul>
<ul id="ul2">
    <li>Test 3</li>
    <li>Test 4</li>
</ul>
<ul id="ul3">
    <li>Test 5</li>
    <li>Test 6</li>
</ul>

Does anyone know of an elegant way of solving this problem?

I know I could use width: 33.33%, however there's a small part of me inside that cries knowing that it's not 100% bang on.

  • 1
    why not use width: 33.33% instead of the calc function? – web-tiki May 27 '15 at 10:57
  • @web-tiki because 33.33 * 3 = 99.99, not 100 – Jamie Barker May 27 '15 at 11:00
  • @web-tiki Firefox does, AFAIK. – Jamie Barker May 27 '15 at 11:05
  • @web-tiki Also, this web page is sometimes being loaded into an iframe within another screen, so it can have these small widths. – Jamie Barker May 27 '15 at 11:08
  • What I mean is that even on wide displays the calculation with 33.33% has and error lower than 1pixel (1920 * 33.33% =639.936 and 639.936 * 3 = 1919.808) which also prevents the last element from breaking on a new line and solve your issue. But you can always make the calculations more presice with width:33.333333333%. – web-tiki May 27 '15 at 11:17
12

Try width: calc(100% * 0.33333); to make sure float rounding errors err on the side of caution or width: calc((100% / 3) - 0.1px);.

  • Doing this makes the width generated to be 260.64px (using the above example). The fact it's not .66 really bugs me :P. It's also basically the same as what @web-tiki suggested in a comment (width: 33.33%) – Jamie Barker May 27 '15 at 11:06
  • Are you looking for mathematical perfection or a working solution? :) There is currently no screen available to consumers (to my knowledge) which will care about anything smaller than 0.3px. It will be rounded by the browser, only in a later stage? – Niklas Brunberg May 27 '15 at 11:10
  • The best of both worlds ideally. Of course I'll take working over perfection but I'm going to hold off for the moment in case someone has a solution I'm looking for. – Jamie Barker May 27 '15 at 11:13
  • Just for sake of fiddling around, try this one (jsfiddle.net/NiklasBr/6wo3q40e/2) which does not require JS. I know it is likely not a complete solution, but still… – Niklas Brunberg May 27 '15 at 11:24
  • Thanks, but my JS was dumbed down and I added the line-height thing just to make me feel better :P. The number of LI's are dynamic so the height has to be generated using JS, also it would appear calc(100vw / 3) produces the same outcome as calc(100% / 3) :(. Nice idea though! – Jamie Barker May 27 '15 at 11:31
9

It would seem that the suggestion by @web-tiki with:

width:33.33%;

is the best option.

0

Better option:

li {
    &:last-child {
        margin-right: -1px;
    }
}

And you can use: width: calc(100% / 3)

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