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I am looking to understand this seeming discrepancy:

Comparator.compare takes two objects as input arguments and compares them, not doing anything with or to this. Why can't it therefore be a static method?

Comparator.equals takes one other object as an input argument and compares it to this.

Why is there a difference in design paradigm? Why doesn't compare just ask for a single Object argument and compare it to this?

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    Because interfaces don't work with static methods. You couldn't inject a Comparator with a static compare method anywhere. – Sotirios Delimanolis May 27 '15 at 15:30
  • that answers only the question in the 2nd paragraph. there is a bigger question wrapping around it – amphibient May 27 '15 at 15:30
  • Comparator.equals is used to check whether this comparator (in which you are defining equals method) is equal to any other comparator object – Arjit May 27 '15 at 15:32
  • Wait, Comparator#equals? What? Do you mean Object#equals? Read the Javadoc of the overriden version. – Sotirios Delimanolis May 27 '15 at 15:32
  • @SotiriosDelimanolis Not true if you have Java 8. – CKing May 27 '15 at 15:32
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An implementation of Comparator.equals() will be an override of Object.equals(), and it is supposed to compare the Comparator itself to another Comparator. As such, it is unrelated to Comparator.compare(), which is supposed to compare two objects of another type.

See Chetan Kinger's answer for the static part.

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    Why doesn't compare just ask for a single Object argument and compare it to this? – amphibient May 27 '15 at 15:33
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    @amphibient There's Comparable for that. – Sotirios Delimanolis May 27 '15 at 15:33
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    Because that's the purpose of Comparable, which should be implemented by objects that are capable of comparing themselves to other objects. Objects that do not have that capability, or that can be compared in different ways, can instead "outsource" their comparison to Comparator. – Aasmund Eldhuset May 27 '15 at 15:33
  • i confused Comparable and Comparator. – amphibient May 27 '15 at 15:38
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    @AasmundEldhuset Thank you for the credit. Very few people would have accepted such a request. – CKing May 27 '15 at 19:17
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The equals is to compare this Comparator with another one. The comparison concerns the two values of the type of the generic parameter.

Say you would make your own comparison API with static functions. Then you could pass a Java 8 "function."

myCollection.mySort(MyComparator::compare);

Then it would be hard to make a parametrized comparator, say with some extra criteria. Static fields would be a no-go in a multi-threaded system.

You might however like the java 8 builder pattern of combinable comparators,

Comparator<Employee> fullNameComparator = 
        Comparator.comparing(Employee::getLastName)
                  .thenComparing(Employee::getFirstName);
employees.sort(fullNameComparator);
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Comparator allows for an unlimited number of possible implementations for a given class. This allows you to, for example, sort a list by a number of different criteria.

Let's say that you have a list of Employee. You can have on comparator that will sort by salary and another that will sort by name.

The equals() method is overridden from Object. This design allows the class implementer to specify the one and only one way that two instances will be considered equal. Note that it would be a bit unusual to override equals() for a class that is specifically used as a Comparator.

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While the Sotirios answer is correct, Comparator is also like an external "tool" to compare "things" (two objects), so it does not make any sense to refer a Comparator to itself ("this" reference). Imagine a Comparator as a pair of scales: it does not measure itself but two different objects weights.

For "this" reference you have to implement another interface Comparable which is more similar to the built-in Object "equals".

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Comparator.compare takes two objects as input arguments and compares them, not doing anything with or to this. Why can't it therefore be a static method?

It could be static, but that would prevent you from passing a comparison function as an argument to other functions. Because functions aren't first-class citizens in Java, you essentially have to wrap that single function with an interface to make it passable.

Comparator.equals takes one other object as an input argument and compares it to this. Why is there a difference in design paradigm? Why doesn't compare just ask for a single Object argument and compare it to this?

The equals method if for seeing if the current Comparator is equal to some other Comparator, not for comparing arbitrary objects.

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Why can't it therefore be a static method?

A static method can't be overriden. If the compare method in Comparator were static, there would be no way for a class that implements Comparator to define their own comparing strategy. Also, a static method would not really be a part of the contract of the Comprator interface. (Java 8 allows interfaces to have static methods)

Why doesn't compare just ask for a single Object argument and compare it to this

The purpose of a Comparator is to allow you to define one or more comparison strategies that are not the natural comparison strategy for a class. Ideally, a Comparator must be implemented by a class different from the one it defines the comparison strategy for. Therefore, it does not make sense for a Comparator to depend on the this reference of the class it defines the comparison strategy for. If you want to define a natural comparison strategy for a class, you can implement Comparable instead. Comparable has a compareTo method which operates on this and therefore takes only one argument.

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