I have a working solution but am looking for a cleaner, more readable solution that perhaps takes advantage of some of the newer dplyr window functions.

Using the mtcars dataset, if I want to look at the 25th, 50th, 75th percentiles and the mean and count of miles per gallon ("mpg") by the number of cylinders ("cyl"), I use the following code:

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

# load data
data("mtcars")

# Percentiles used in calculation
p <- c(.25,.5,.75)

# old dplyr solution 
mtcars %>% group_by(cyl) %>% 
  do(data.frame(p=p, stats=quantile(.$mpg, probs=p), 
                n = length(.$mpg), avg = mean(.$mpg))) %>%
  spread(p, stats) %>%
  select(1, 4:6, 3, 2)

# note: the select and spread statements are just to get the data into
#       the format in which I'd like to see it, but are not critical

Is there a way I can do this more cleanly with dplyr using some of the summary functions (n_tiles, percent_rank, etc.)? By cleanly, I mean without the "do" statement.

Thank you

  • I should add that this code also uses the "tidyr" package, which is where the "spread" function comes from – dreww2 May 27 '15 at 16:39
up vote 20 down vote accepted

If you're up for using purrr::map, you can do it like this!

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)
library(broom)
library(purrr)

mtcars %>%
  nest(-cyl) %>%
  mutate(Quantiles = map(data, ~ quantile(.$mpg))) %>% 
  unnest(map(Quantiles, tidy))

#> # A tibble: 15 × 3
#>      cyl names     x
#>    <dbl> <chr> <dbl>
#> 1      6    0% 17.80
#> 2      6   25% 18.65
#> 3      6   50% 19.70
#> 4      6   75% 21.00
#> 5      6  100% 21.40
#> 6      4    0% 21.40
#> 7      4   25% 22.80
#> 8      4   50% 26.00
#> 9      4   75% 30.40
#> 10     4  100% 33.90
#> 11     8    0% 10.40
#> 12     8   25% 14.40
#> 13     8   50% 15.20
#> 14     8   75% 16.25
#> 15     8  100% 19.20

One nice thing about this approach is the output is tidy, one observation per row.

  • Thanks, I think this is the cleanest approach. – Fato39 Aug 17 '17 at 14:02
  • The only thing I'd add is a "spread" at the end to make things tabular for presentation purposes, i.e. %>% spread(names,x) – Abhijit May 15 at 19:36

Here's a dplyr approach that avoids do but requires a separate call to quantile for each quantile value.

mtcars %>% group_by(cyl) %>%
  summarise(`25%`=quantile(mpg, probs=0.25),
            `50%`=quantile(mpg, probs=0.5),
            `75%`=quantile(mpg, probs=0.75),
            avg=mean(mpg),
            n=n())

  cyl   25%  50%   75%      avg  n
1   4 22.80 26.0 30.40 26.66364 11
2   6 18.65 19.7 21.00 19.74286  7
3   8 14.40 15.2 16.25 15.10000 14

It would be better if summarise could return multiple values with a single call to quantile, but this appears to be an open issue in dplyr development.

UPDATE: Here's a variation on @JuliaSilge's answer that uses nesting to get the quantiles, but without the use of map. It does, however, require an extra line of code to add a column listing the quantile levels, as I'm not sure how (or if it's possible) to capture the names of the quantiles into a separate column directly from the call to quantile.

p = c(0.25,0.5,0.75)

mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl) %>% 
  summarise(quantiles = list(sprintf("%1.0f%%", p*100)),
            mpg = list(quantile(mpg, p))) %>% 
  unnest
    cyl quantiles   mpg
1     4       25% 22.80
2     4       50% 26.00
3     4       75% 30.40
4     6       25% 18.65
5     6       50% 19.70
6     6       75% 21.00
7     8       25% 14.40
8     8       50% 15.20
9     8       75% 16.25
  • Thanks -- this is the answer I was looking for, which is that you can do it, but not in a seamless way with a single call to quantile (and that it is an open issue in dplyr development). – dreww2 May 28 '15 at 16:30

This is a dplyr approach that uses the tidy() function of the broom package, unfortunately it still requires do(), but it is a lot simpler.

library(dplyr)
library(broom)

mtcars %>%
    group_by(cyl) %>%
    do( tidy(t(quantile(.$mpg))) )

which gives:

    cyl   X0.  X25.  X50.  X75. X100.
  (dbl) (dbl) (dbl) (dbl) (dbl) (dbl)
1     4  21.4 22.80  26.0 30.40  33.9
2     6  17.8 18.65  19.7 21.00  21.4
3     8  10.4 14.40  15.2 16.25  19.2

Note the use of t() since the broom package does not have a method for named numerics.

This is based on my earlier answer for summary() here.

  • 1
    If you also want to change column names you could even use tidy::spread() instead of t() and stringr::str_c(): mtcars %>% group_by(cyl) %>% do(tidy(quantile(.$mpg))) %>% mutate(names = stringr::str_c("Q", names)) %>% tidyr::spread(names, x). It is more verbose but gives you some freedom in adjustments. – giovannotti Jun 23 at 13:48

Not sure how to avoid do() in dplyr, but you can do this with c() and as.list() with data.table in a pretty straightforward manner:

require(data.table) 
as.data.table(mtcars)[, c(as.list(quantile(mpg, probs=p)), 
                        avg=mean(mpg), n=.N), by=cyl]
#    cyl   25%  50%   75%      avg  n
# 1:   6 18.65 19.7 21.00 19.74286  7
# 2:   4 22.80 26.0 30.40 26.66364 11
# 3:   8 14.40 15.2 16.25 15.10000 14

Replace by with keyby if you want them ordered by cyl column.

  • Good. I was aware of the as.list method in [.data.table and I tried it in dplyr but failed. – 42- May 27 '15 at 20:33
  • This is a nice solution -- I wish I could use it for my particular project but can't for reasons unrelated to the answer itself – dreww2 May 28 '15 at 16:29

This solution uses dplyr and tidyr only, lets you specify your quantiles in the dplyr chain, and takes advantage of tidyr::crossing() to "stack" multiple copies of the dataset prior to grouping and summarising.

diamonds %>%  # Initial data
  tidyr::crossing(pctile = 0:4/4) %>%  # Specify quantiles; crossing() is like expand.grid()
  dplyr::group_by(cut, pctile) %>%  # Indicate your grouping var, plus your quantile var
  dplyr::summarise(quantile_value = quantile(price, unique(pctile))) %>%  # unique() is needed
  dplyr::mutate(pctile = sprintf("%1.0f%%", pctile*100))  # Optional prettification

Result:

# A tibble: 25 x 3
# Groups:   cut [5]
         cut pctile quantile_value
       <ord>  <chr>          <dbl>
 1      Fair     0%         337.00
 2      Fair    25%        2050.25
 3      Fair    50%        3282.00
 4      Fair    75%        5205.50
 5      Fair   100%       18574.00
 6      Good     0%         327.00
 7      Good    25%        1145.00
 8      Good    50%        3050.50
 9      Good    75%        5028.00
10      Good   100%       18788.00
11 Very Good     0%         336.00
12 Very Good    25%         912.00
13 Very Good    50%        2648.00
14 Very Good    75%        5372.75
15 Very Good   100%       18818.00
16   Premium     0%         326.00
17   Premium    25%        1046.00
18   Premium    50%        3185.00
19   Premium    75%        6296.00
20   Premium   100%       18823.00
21     Ideal     0%         326.00
22     Ideal    25%         878.00
23     Ideal    50%        1810.00
24     Ideal    75%        4678.50
25     Ideal   100%       18806.00

The unique() is necessary to let dplyr::summarise() know that you only want one value per group.

Here's a fairly readable solution that uses dplyr and purrr to return quantiles in a tidy format:

Code

library(dplyr)
library(purrr)

mtcars %>% 
    group_by(cyl) %>% 
    do({x <- .$mpg
        map_dfr(.x = c(.25, .5, .75),
                .f = ~ data_frame(Quantile = .x,
                                  Value = quantile(x, probs = .x)))
       })

Result

# A tibble: 9 x 3
# Groups:   cyl [3]
    cyl Quantile Value
  <dbl>    <dbl> <dbl>
1     4     0.25 22.80
2     4     0.50 26.00
3     4     0.75 30.40
4     6     0.25 18.65
5     6     0.50 19.70
6     6     0.75 21.00
7     8     0.25 14.40
8     8     0.50 15.20
9     8     0.75 16.25

Here is a solution using a combination of dplyr, purrr, and rlang:

library(dplyr)
#> 
#> Attaching package: 'dplyr'
#> The following objects are masked from 'package:stats':
#> 
#>     filter, lag
#> The following objects are masked from 'package:base':
#> 
#>     intersect, setdiff, setequal, union
library(tidyr)
library(purrr)

# load data
data("mtcars")

# Percentiles used in calculation
p <- c(.25,.5,.75)

p_names <- paste0(p*100, "%")
p_funs <- map(p, ~partial(quantile, probs = .x, na.rm = TRUE)) %>% 
  set_names(nm = p_names)

# dplyr/purrr/rlang solution 
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl) %>% 
  summarize_at(vars(mpg), funs(!!!p_funs))
#> # A tibble: 3 x 4
#>     cyl `25%` `50%` `75%`
#>   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1     4  22.8  26    30.4
#> 2     6  18.6  19.7  21  
#> 3     8  14.4  15.2  16.2


#Especially useful if you want to summarize more variables
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl) %>% 
  summarize_at(vars(mpg, drat), funs(!!!p_funs))
#> # A tibble: 3 x 7
#>     cyl `mpg_25%` `drat_25%` `mpg_50%` `drat_50%` `mpg_75%` `drat_75%`
#>   <dbl>     <dbl>      <dbl>     <dbl>      <dbl>     <dbl>      <dbl>
#> 1     4      22.8       3.81      26         4.08      30.4       4.16
#> 2     6      18.6       3.35      19.7       3.9       21         3.91
#> 3     8      14.4       3.07      15.2       3.12      16.2       3.22

Created on 2018-10-01 by the reprex package (v0.2.0).

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