95

Is C#'s Random.Next() method thread safe?

2
  • 1
    “Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.” (from the docs on System.Random). [OK, to be fair: the single most common problem with pseudo-random numbers that people seem to have is also explained there and they still keep asking]
    – Joey
    Jun 16, 2010 at 8:43
  • 3
    I believe you can now use Random.Shared property as of .NET 6 for a thread-safe Random instance Dec 21, 2021 at 4:37

15 Answers 15

96

No, using the same instance from multiple threads can cause it to break and return all 0's. However, creating a thread-safe version (without needing nasty locks on every call to Next()) is simple. Adapted from the idea in this article:

public class ThreadSafeRandom
{
    private static readonly Random _global = new Random();
    [ThreadStatic] private static Random _local;

    public int Next()
    {
        if (_local == null)
        {
            int seed;
            lock (_global)
            {
                seed = _global.Next();
            }
            _local = new Random(seed);
        }

        return _local.Next();
    }
}

The idea is to keep a separate static Random variable for each thread. Doing that in the obvious way fails, however, because of another issue with Random - if multiple instances are created at nearly the same time (within about 15ms), they will all return the same values! To fix this, we create a globally-static Random instance to generate the seeds used by each thread.

The above article, by the way, has code demonstrating both of these issues with Random.

21
  • 12
    Nice, but don't like the way you need to create a ThreadSafeRandom to use this. Why not use a static property with a lazy getter which contains the construtors code at present. Idea from here: confluence.jetbrains.com/display/ReSharper/… Then the whole class can be static.
    – weston
    May 10, 2013 at 8:40
  • 2
    @weston: That is usually considered an anti-pattern. Aside from losing all OOP benefits, the primary reason is that static objects cannot be mocked, which is vital for unit-testing any classes that use this. May 10, 2013 at 16:14
  • 3
    You can always add a layer of indirection when needed, e.g. add an IRandom, and a class that redirects calls to a static at runtime, this would allow mocking. Just for me, it all the members are static, that implies I should have a static class, it tells the user more, it says that each instance is not separate sequence of random numbers, it is shared. This is the approach I have taken before when I need to mock a static framework class.
    – weston
    May 10, 2013 at 19:23
  • 6
    Code won't work if you actually use it from multiple threads since _local is not created everytime it is accessed: NullRefereceException.
    – Laie
    Apr 21, 2015 at 5:49
  • 3
    As mentioned in the comment earlier, this approach doesn't actually work when used from multiple threads. _local can't be instantiated in the constructor.
    – Alex
    Feb 2, 2018 at 10:31
36

There's nothing special done in the Next method to achieve thread safety. However, it's an instance method. If you don't share instances of Random across different threads, you don't have to worry about state corruption within an instance. Do not use a single instance of Random across different threads without holding an exclusive lock of some sort.

Jon Skeet has a couple nice posts on this subject:

StaticRandom
Revisiting randomness

As noted by some commentators, there is another potential problem in using different instances of Random that are thread-exclusive, but are seeded identically, and therefore induce the identical sequences of pseudorandom numbers, because they may be created at the same time or within close temporal proximity of each other. One way to alleviate that issue is to use a master Random instance (which is locked by a single thread) to generate some random seeds and initialize new Random instances for every other thread to use.

5
  • 16
    "If you don't share instances of Random across different threads, you don't have much to worry about." - This is false. Because of the way Random was created, if two separate instances of Random are created on two separate threads at nearly the same time, they will have the same seeds (and thus return the same values). See my answer for a workaround. Dec 26, 2012 at 2:33
  • 6
    @BlueRaja I was specifically targeting the state corruption issue within a single instance. Of course, as you mention, the orthogonal problem of statistical relation across two distinct Random instances requires further care.
    – mmx
    Dec 26, 2012 at 3:39
  • 29
    I have no idea why this is marked as the answer! Q: "Is Random.Next thread safe?" A: "If you only use it from one thread, then yes it is thread safe".... Worst answer ever!
    – Mick
    Apr 23, 2015 at 3:55
  • Worst thing you can do is like to outside articles to give an answer and NOT actually include the answer... Especially when it is as simple as this. Mar 1, 2018 at 21:46
  • 1
    "they will have the same seeds" This has been fixed in .Net Core.
    – Magnus
    Jul 2, 2020 at 6:19
25

The offical answer from Microsoft is a very strong no. From http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.random.aspx#8:

Random objects are not thread safe. If your app calls Random methods from multiple threads, you must use a synchronization object to ensure that only one thread can access the random number generator at a time. If you don't ensure that the Random object is accessed in a thread-safe way, calls to methods that return random numbers return 0.

As described in the docs, there is a very nasty side effect that can happen when the same Random object is used by multiple threads: it just stops working.

(i.e. there is a race condition which when triggered, the return value from the 'random.Next....' methods will be 0 for all subsequent calls.)

2
  • 1
    There is a nastier side effect of using different instances of random object. it returns the same generated number for multiple threads. from same article: Instead of instantiating individual Random objects, we recommend that you create a single Random instance to generate all the random numbers needed by your app. However, Random objects are not thread safe.
    – AaA
    Oct 4, 2015 at 6:35
  • 1
    This is gold. I'm the lucky one in getting the ZERO result from the Random object Oct 23, 2017 at 17:04
14

No, it's not thread safe. If you need to use the same instance from different threads, you have to synchronise the usage.

I can't really see any reason why you would need that, though. It would be more efficient for each thread to have their own instance of the Random class.

6
  • This can bite you in the ass if you have a unit test object and want to generate tons of test objects at once. The reason for this is that many people make Random a global object for ease of use. I just did that and rand.Next() kept generating 0 as a a value.
    – JSWork
    Sep 22, 2011 at 21:17
  • 1
    @JSWork: I don't really follow what you mean. What do you refer to when you say "this"? If I understand your last sentence correctly, you accessed the object across threads without synchronising it, which would explain the result.
    – Guffa
    Sep 22, 2011 at 21:43
  • 1
    You are correct. I apologize - I phrased this poorly. Not doing what you mentioned can bite you in the ass. As cautionary note, readers should be careful when making a new random object for every thread as well - random objects use the current time as their seed. There is a 10ms gap between seed changes.
    – JSWork
    Sep 26, 2011 at 13:59
  • 3
    @JSWork: Yes, there is a timing issue if the threads are started at the same time. You can use one Random object in the main thread to provide seeds for creating Random objects for the threads to get around that.
    – Guffa
    Sep 26, 2011 at 14:14
  • 1
    If you are to make a separate random for each thread use something more unique to each thread for a seed, such as thread id or time+thread id or similar.
    – apokryfos
    Jan 20, 2013 at 12:49
9

Another thread safe way is to use ThreadLocal<T> as follows:

new ThreadLocal<Random>(() => new Random(GenerateSeed()));

The GenerateSeed() method will need to return a unique value each time it is called to assure that the random number sequences are unique in each thread.

static int SeedCount = 0;
static int GenerateSeed() { 
    return (int) ((DateTime.Now.Ticks << 4) + 
                   (Interlocked.Increment(ref SeedCount))); 
}

Will work for small numbers of threads.

4
  • 1
    But in this case, doesn't it make sure that the method doesn't need to be thread-safe.... each thread will access their own copy of the object.
    – gap
    Jun 29, 2011 at 19:47
  • 5
    ++SeedCount introduces a race condition. Use Interlocked.Increment instead. Dec 25, 2012 at 3:17
  • 1
    As noted by OP, this will work with a limited number of threads, this would likely be a poor choice inside of ASP.NET Sep 17, 2014 at 18:13
  • 2
    I think you can replace the call to GenerateSeed() in Random constructor with: Guid.NewGuid().GetHashCode()) Feb 1, 2019 at 17:28
4

For what its worth, here is a thread-safe, cryptographically strong RNG that inherits Random.

The implementation includes static entry points for ease of use, they have the same names as the public instance methods but are prefixed with "Get".

A call to the RNGCryptoServiceProvider.GetBytes is a relatively expensive operation. This is mitigated through the use of an internal buffer or "Pool" to make less frequent, and more efficient use of RNGCryptoServiceProvider. If there are few generations in an application domain then this could be viewed as overhead.

using System;
using System.Security.Cryptography;

public class SafeRandom : Random
{
    private const int PoolSize = 2048;

    private static readonly Lazy<RandomNumberGenerator> Rng =
        new Lazy<RandomNumberGenerator>(() => new RNGCryptoServiceProvider());

    private static readonly Lazy<object> PositionLock =
        new Lazy<object>(() => new object());

    private static readonly Lazy<byte[]> Pool =
        new Lazy<byte[]>(() => GeneratePool(new byte[PoolSize]));

    private static int bufferPosition;

    public static int GetNext()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            var result = (int)(GetRandomUInt32() & int.MaxValue);

            if (result != int.MaxValue)
            {
                return result;
            }
        }
    }

    public static int GetNext(int maxValue)
    {
        if (maxValue < 1)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                "Must be greater than zero.",
                "maxValue");
        }
        return GetNext(0, maxValue);
    }

    public static int GetNext(int minValue, int maxValue)
    {
        const long Max = 1 + (long)uint.MaxValue;

        if (minValue >= maxValue)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                "minValue is greater than or equal to maxValue");
        }

        long diff = maxValue - minValue;
        var limit = Max - (Max % diff);

        while (true)
        {
            var rand = GetRandomUInt32();
            if (rand < limit)
            {
                return (int)(minValue + (rand % diff));
            }
        }
    }

    public static void GetNextBytes(byte[] buffer)
    {
        if (buffer == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("buffer");
        }

        if (buffer.Length < PoolSize)
        {
            lock (PositionLock.Value)
            {
                if ((PoolSize - bufferPosition) < buffer.Length)
                {
                    GeneratePool(Pool.Value);
                }

                Buffer.BlockCopy(
                    Pool.Value,
                    bufferPosition,
                    buffer,
                    0,
                    buffer.Length);
                bufferPosition += buffer.Length;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            Rng.Value.GetBytes(buffer);
        }
    }

    public static double GetNextDouble()
    {
        return GetRandomUInt32() / (1.0 + uint.MaxValue);
    }

    public override int Next()
    {
        return GetNext();
    }

    public override int Next(int maxValue)
    {
        return GetNext(0, maxValue);
    }

    public override int Next(int minValue, int maxValue)
    {
        return GetNext(minValue, maxValue);
    }

    public override void NextBytes(byte[] buffer)
    {
        GetNextBytes(buffer);
    }

    public override double NextDouble()
    {
        return GetNextDouble();
    }

    private static byte[] GeneratePool(byte[] buffer)
    {
        bufferPosition = 0;
        Rng.Value.GetBytes(buffer);
        return buffer;
    }

    private static uint GetRandomUInt32()
    {
        uint result;
        lock (PositionLock.Value)
        {
            if ((PoolSize - bufferPosition) < sizeof(uint))
            {
                GeneratePool(Pool.Value)
            }

            result = BitConverter.ToUInt32(
                Pool.Value,
                bufferPosition);
            bufferPosition+= sizeof(uint);
        }

        return result;
    }
}
3
  • What is the purpose of PositionLock = new Lazy<object>(() => new object());? Shouldn't this just be SyncRoot = new object();? Sep 17, 2014 at 18:03
  • @ChrisMarisic, I was following the pattern linked below. However, there is minimal benefit, if any, to the lazy instantiation of the lock so your suggestion seems reasonable. csharpindepth.com/articles/general/singleton.aspx#lazy
    – Jodrell
    Sep 18, 2014 at 8:08
  • This looks like a great solution but I've some questions why use BitConverter.ToUInt32 vs BitConverter.ToInt32 it would cleanup the GetNext()? And why make the pool static? It might save you from multiple pools but in concurrent systems where you have many SafeRandom instances it might also become a bottle neck. How to seed the RNGCryptoServiceProvider?
    – Wouter
    Aug 15, 2020 at 14:12
4

Since Random isn't thread-safe, you should have one per thread, rather than a global instance. If you're worried about these multiple Random classes being seeded at the same time (i.e. by DateTime.Now.Ticks or such), you can use Guids to seed each of them. The .NET Guid generator goes to considerable lengths to ensure non-repeatable results, hence:

var rnd = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(Guid.NewGuid().ToByteArray(), 0))
6
  • 2
    -1; GUIDs generated with NewGuid are practically guaranteed to be unique, but the first 4 bytes of those GUIDs (which is all that BitConverter.ToInt32 looks at) are not. As a general principle, treating substrings of GUIDs as unique is a terrible idea.
    – Mark Amery
    Aug 29, 2017 at 22:22
  • 2
    The only thing that redeems this approach in this particular case is that .NET's Guid.NewGuid, at least on Windows, uses version 4 GUIDs, which are mostly randomly generated. In particular, the first 32 bits are randomly generated, so you're essentially just seeding your Random instance with a (presumably cryptographically?) random number, with a 1 in 2 billion collision chance. It took me hours of research to determine that, though, and I still have no idea how .NET Core's NewGuid() behaves on non-Windows OSes.
    – Mark Amery
    Aug 29, 2017 at 22:37
  • @MarkAmery The OP did not specify whether cryptographic quality was required, so I feel that the answer is still useful as a one-liner for quick coding in non-critical situations. Based on your first comment, I modified the code to avoid the first four bytes. Aug 30, 2017 at 0:15
  • 1
    Using the second 4 bytes instead of the first 4 doesn't help; when I said that the first 4 bytes of a GUID are not guaranteed to be unique, what I meant was that no 4 bytes of a GUID are supposed to be unique; the entire 16 byte GUID is, but not any smaller part of it. You've actually made things worse with your change, because for version 4 GUIDs (used by .NET on Windows) the second 4 bytes include 4 non-random bits with fixed values; your edit has reduced the number of possible seed values to the low hundreds of millions.
    – Mark Amery
    Sep 3, 2017 at 20:02
  • 1
    you could replace the bitconverter with guid.newguid().gethashcode()
    – Wouter
    Aug 15, 2020 at 13:51
3

Reimplementation of BlueRaja's answer using ThreadLocal:

public static class ThreadSafeRandom
{
    private static readonly System.Random GlobalRandom = new Random();
    private static readonly ThreadLocal<Random> LocalRandom = new ThreadLocal<Random>(() => 
    {
        lock (GlobalRandom)
        {
            return new Random(GlobalRandom.Next());
        }
    });

    public static int Next(int min = 0, int max = Int32.MaxValue)
    {
        return LocalRandom.Value.Next(min, max);
    }
}
3
  • For extra style points you could have used a Lazy<Random> GlobalRandom, to avoid the explicit lock. 😃 Dec 2, 2020 at 13:01
  • 1
    @TheodorZoulias not sure I follow, the problem is not just initialization - if we drop the global lock we could have 2 threads accessing the global Random at the same time... Dec 2, 2020 at 21:16
  • 1
    Ohad you are right. I don't know what I was thinking. The Lazy<T> class offers nothing in this case. Dec 2, 2020 at 22:35
2

Per documentation

Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.random.aspx

3
  • 2
    Documentation that you quoted is actually incorrect. I believe it's a machine-generated content. The Community Content to that topic on MSDN contains a lot of info why the Random type is not thread safe and how to solve this problem (either with cryptography or by using "semaphores")
    – user766279
    Aug 14, 2011 at 23:34
  • 2
    @MTG Your comment is confused. Random has no static members, so the quoted docs are effectively stating that all of its members are "not guaranteed to be thread safe". You state that this is incorrect, then back this up by saying that... Random is not thread safe? That's pretty much the same thing the docs said!
    – Mark Amery
    Aug 29, 2017 at 22:45
  • Bangs head on desk. Yes you are correct "That's pretty much the same thing the docs said!" Aug 31, 2017 at 21:32
2

Here is a simple solution that doesn't involve creating classes. Hides everything inside an ad-hoc lambda:

private static Func<int, int, int> GetRandomFunc()
{
    Random random = new Random();
    object lockObject = new object();

    return (min, max) =>
    {
        lock (lockObject)
        {
            return random.Next(min, max);
        }
    };
}

In any class that needs a thread safe random generator define

private static readonly Func<int, int, int> GetRandomNext = GetRandomFunc();

Then use it freely inside your class:

int nextRandomValue = GetRandomNext(0, 10);

The radndom function can have different signatures depending what is needed. e.g.

private static Func<int> GetRandomFunc()
{
    Random random = new Random();
    object lockObject = new object();

    return () =>
    {
        lock (lockObject)
        {
            return random.Next();
        }
    };
}
1
  • Upvoted for the idea, but I don't think that it's practical in general. Essentially you construct an object having a single method, and then return this method. Feb 27, 2021 at 7:07
1

For a thread safe random number generator look at RNGCryptoServiceProvider. From the docs:

Thread Safety

This type is thread safe.

5
  • 1
    Yeah the RNGCryptoServiceProvider is gold. Much better than Random, though there is a bit more legwork to make it spit out a particular type of number (since it generates random bytes).
    – Rangoric
    Jun 16, 2010 at 5:05
  • 1
    @Rangoric: No, it's not better than Random for any purpose where either can be used. If you need randomness for encryption purposes the Random class is not an option, for any purpose where you can choose, the Random class is faster and easier to use.
    – Guffa
    Jun 16, 2010 at 6:06
  • @Guffa ease of use is a one time thing though as I already stuffed it into a library, so is not really a good point. Being faster is a valid point, though I'd rather have the real randomness as opposed to looks good randomness. And for that I also get to have it be thread safe. Although now I intend to test this to see how much slower it is (Random produces doubles and converts them to what you ask for so it may even depend on exactly what number range you need)
    – Rangoric
    Jun 16, 2010 at 14:08
  • In C# I am finding that with a very basic RNGCrypto implementation it's about 100:1 depending on the exact number being looked for (127 does twice as good as 128 for instance). Next I plan to add threading and see how it does (why not :) )
    – Rangoric
    Jun 16, 2010 at 14:44
  • Update to above statement. I got it to a 2:1 for ranges of under 256 values, and does better the closer to a factor of 256 the number we want is.
    – Rangoric
    Jun 16, 2010 at 15:55
0

I just created Random instance on a load of threads simultaneously and got unexpected patterns from the results because, presumably, all the seeds were the same.

My solution was to create a thread safe class -

  public class StaticRandom
    {
        static Random rnd = new Random();

        public static int GetNext()
        {
            // random is not properly thread safe
            lock(rnd)
            {
                return rnd.Next();
            }
        }
    }

And then, create a new Random object instance for each thread -

// Take this threads instance seed from the static global version
Random rnd = new Random(StaticRandom.GetNext());
0

Here's an efficient solution using ThreadLocal:

public class ThreadSafeRandom
{
    private static readonly Random _global = new Random();
    private static readonly ThreadLocal<Random> _local = new ThreadLocal<Random>(() =>
    {
        int seed;
        lock (_global)
        {
            seed = _global.Next();
        }
        return new Random(seed);
    });

    public static Random Instance => _local.Value;
}

To use, replace:

var random = new Random();
var myNum = random.Next();

With:

var myNum = ThreadSafeRandom.Instance.Next();

This solution has been packaged as a NuGet package with source available on GitHub.

-1

UPDATED: It is not. You need to either reuse an instance of Random on each consecutive call with locking some "semaphore" object while calling the .Next() method or use a new instance with a guaranteed random seed on each such call. You can get the guaranteed different seed by using cryptography in .NET as Yassir suggested.

0
-1

The traditional thread local storage approach can be improved upon by using a lock-less algorithm for the seed. The following was shamelessly stolen from Java's algorithm (possibly even improving on it):

public static class RandomGen2 
{
    private static readonly ThreadLocal<Random> _rng = 
                       new ThreadLocal<Random>(() => new Random(GetUniqueSeed()));

    public static int Next() 
    { 
        return _rng.Value.Next(); 
    } 

    private const long SeedFactor = 1181783497276652981L;
    private static long _seed = 8682522807148012L;

    public static int GetUniqueSeed()
    {
        long next, current;
        do
        {
            current = Interlocked.Read(ref _seed);
            next = current * SeedFactor;
        } while (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _seed, next, current) != current);
        return (int)next ^ Environment.TickCount;
   } 
}
1
  • 1
    The (unavoidable) cast to int kind of defeats the point of this. Java's Random is seeded with a long, but C#'s just takes an int... and worse still, it uses the absolute value of that signed int as the seed, meaning there's effectively only 2^31 distinct seeds. Having good long seed generation is kind of a waste if you're then throwing away most bits of the long; randomly seeding C#'s random, even if your random seed is perfectly random, still leaves you with a roughly 1 in 2 billion chance of collision.
    – Mark Amery
    Aug 29, 2017 at 23:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.