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Yesterday during an interview I was asked what DI and IoC in spring were. My reply was:

when a class(A) extends abstract class(B) or implements interface(B) or create a object of class(B) of any class in it, then A is said said to be dependent on B. Injecting this dependency, i.e. injecting the object in costructor or in setter method is called DI and in this process control over creating object goes to the "outside world" like XML configuration, this inversion of control is IoC. DI is not necessary IOC. We can still have DI when there is no IOC.

The interviewer didn't agree with me - where was I wrong?

One more thing-

As we used Super class reference variable or coding through interface in constructor or setter method parameter.Is this any way related with DI/IOC or this is only to achieve loose coupling?

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    Although from a design perspective, inheritance relationship is considered as a dependency, in case of spring, only composition is considered as a dependency. You inject dependent bean(s) and its properties – TheLostMind May 28 '15 at 7:08
  • You should have a look at this question. What I am saying is inheritance examples don't stand well in context of Spring DI and IOC. It would have made more sense if you had used a has-a relationship to expalin your understanding – TheLostMind May 28 '15 at 7:14
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    Composition is having an instance of class B in class A, for example as a field. – mtyurt May 28 '15 at 7:14
  • @dubey-theHarcourtians - I believe your first sentence about dependency is misleading – TheLostMind May 28 '15 at 8:28
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IoC (Inversion of Control) is an abstract concept. It means objects do not create dependent objects directly, it gets from outside of the object scope.

There are several basic techniques to implement inversion of control.

  • Using a factory pattern
  • Using a service locator pattern
  • Using Dependency Injection(DI), for example
    • Constructor injection
    • Parameter injection
    • Setter injection
    • Interface injection
  • Using a contextualized lookup
  • Using template method design pattern
  • Using strategy design pattern

Source

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First statement***"when a class(A) extends abstract class(B) or implements interface(B)"***

This is inheritance , which can not be injected as dependency via Spring

Second Statement "create a object of class(B) of any class in it, then A is said said to be dependent on B"

sounds good

" Injecting this dependency, i.e. injecting the object in costructor or in setter method is called DI "

Not a clear statement to explain dependency injection. Here the meaning of injection needs to be explained. that is Management of dependencies is handled by spring container , It is who control their lifecycle and thus delegate/inject to the classes who ask for them(via spring config file )

"his process control over creating object goes to the "outside world" like XML configuration"

Here control neither goes to the outside world nor to the xml configuration file but to the spring container. And spring container uses this configuration file to do its work.

"this inversion of control is IoC. DI is not necessary IOC. We can still have DI when there is no IOC."

Though no issues with it but seems incomplete. Here IOC needs to be explained. Trying to explain it via image

NON IOC VS IOC

  • I think- If a class is extending other class this is dependent on this since any change in super will reflect in child.IIas u said control is to container not to xml file,is not appropriate,since controlling is not done by single entity this is a group work,each xml file,container etc involves thats why i used term outside world(class).Still your answer showing a fine way of expressing thats y m not downvoating it. – user4768611 Jun 8 '15 at 11:07
  • Totally agree with you, Inheritance is dependency but my statement was, Inheritance dependency not implemented in Spring. In second statement also, I agree with you that it is group work not by single entity but that group is contained in spring container. – monika arora Jun 9 '15 at 15:25
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Your answer makes sens and I do share the same opinion with a slight variation.

IoC concept was initially heard during the procedural programming era. Therefore from a historical context IoC talked about inversion of the ownership of control-flow i.e. who owns the responsibility to invoke the functions in the desired order - whether it's the functions themselves or should you invert it to some external entity.

However once the OOP emerged, people began to talk about IoC in OOP context where applications are concerned with object creation and managing the relationships between the objects as well, apart from the control-flow. Such applications wanted to invert the ownership of object-creation (rather than control-flow) and required a container which is responsible for object creation, object life-cycle & inject dependencies of the application objects thereby eliminating application objects from creating other concrete object.

In that sense DI is not the same as IoC, since it's not about control-flow, however it's a kind of Io*, i.e. Inversion of ownership of object-creation.

I have discussed further on this topic here.

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