I've written a backend service which is used by a Angular.JS frontend using a factory, like so:

angular.module('app.social', ['ngResource'])
    .factory('Social', function($http) {
        return {
            me: function() {
                return $http.get('http://localhost:3000/me');
            },
            likeVideo: function(link) {
                return $http.post('http://localhost:3000/like/video', { link : link });
            },
            post: function(link) {
                return $http.post('http://localhost:3000/post', { link : link });
            },
            postVideo: function(link) {
                return $http.post('http://localhost:3000/post/video', { link : link });
            },
            friends: function() {
                return $http.get('http://localhost:3000/friends');
            },
            taggableFriends: function() {
                return $http.get('http://localhost:3000/friends/taggable');
            },
            videos: function() {
                return $http.get('http://localhost:3000/videos');
            }
        };
    });

The Social.me endpoint receives profile information from the REST backend. This function is used in various Angular controllers, however (profile page, item detail page, header account button etc.). This means that for every view, profile information is requested from http://localhost:3000/me. Is this good practice, or is it a better idea to cache the information within the factory?


EDIT: Updated code (based on answer from @Rebornix):

angular.module('app.social', ['ngResource'])
    .service('SocialService', function() {
        var serviceData = {
            me: null
        };
        return serviceData;
    })
    .factory('Social', function($http, SocialService) {
        return {
            me: function() {
                if (SocialService.me === null) {
                    return $http.get('http://localhost:3000/me').then(function(response) {
                        SocialService.me = response.data;
                        return SocialService.me;
                    });
                } else {
                    return SocialService.me;
                }
            }
        }
    };
});

In the controller, I use:

angular.module('app.profile', [])
    .controller('ProfileCtrl', ['$window', '$scope', 'Social', function($window, $scope, Social) {
        $scope.me = Social.me();
    }])

And the view:

<div ng-controller="ProfileCtrl">
    <h1 class="profile-name">{{ me.name }}</h1>
</div>

But the view is not updated as the Facebook.me value get initialized on the first request. I guess I have to manually trigger $scope.$apply() somehow?

  • If it's going to be the exact same data every time, then yes, I'd say it'd be better to cache it. – Tom May 28 '15 at 13:21
  • $http can cache it for you, but whether you want to cache it or not depends on the fact that the information is constant or not. – Blackhole May 28 '15 at 13:22
  • Profile information will change, but not on a regular basis. I don't want a view showing old information and another one the updated information, which is why I'm looking for a way to bind all views to this factory to update themselves when this would change, but I'm not sure how to handle this. – Flock Dawson May 28 '15 at 13:23
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can create a service as storage across controllers like

angular.module('app.social', ['ngResource'])
.service("SocialService", function() {
   var info = {
     me: null,
     friends: []
   };
   return info;
})
.factory('Social', function($http, SocialService) {
    return {
        me: function() {
               $http.get('http://localhost:3000/me').then(function(response){
               SocialService.me = response.data;
               });
        },

Then in all your controllers, reference infoService instead of calling API again. What you need to is fetching latest data and refresh infoService, all controllers scope will be notified with this change.

In your controller

angular.module('app.profile', [])
    .controller('ProfileCtrl', ['$window', '$scope', 'SocialService', 'Social', function($window, $scope, SocialService, Social) {
    $scope.SocialService = SocialService;
    // Kick off social factory to update user info, you can move it into 
    // any other functions like `ng-click`.
    Social.me();
}])

Then in your view

{{SocialService.me}}
  • Exactly what I was looking for! Thanks! – Flock Dawson May 28 '15 at 13:27
  • 3
    A far simpler solution, just change this line: $http.get('http://localhost:3000/me', {cache: true});. – Blackhole May 28 '15 at 13:28
  • This won't notify all views on an update, though ;) – Flock Dawson May 28 '15 at 13:30
  • @Blackhole what you mentioned is how to reduce API calls to the backend, it's a good option. But I suppose what Flock needs is a singleton service to store the data. – Rebornix May 28 '15 at 13:32
  • The views don't seem to update, while the variable itself gets initialized. Do I manually need to trigger a scope update as well? – Flock Dawson May 28 '15 at 14:10
(function (app) {
'use strict';

app.factory('myService', MyService);

MyService.$inject = ['$q', 'serviceResource'];

function MyService($q, serviceResource) {
    var jobs = [];

    var service = {
        getJobs: getJobs
    };

    return service;

    //////////////////////////////////////

    function getJobs(refresh) {
        if (refresh) {
            return serviceResource.autosysJobs().$promise.then(function (data) {
                    jobs = data;
                    return jobs;
                }, function (err) {
                    throw err;
                });
        }
        else {
            var deferrer = $q.defer();
            deferrer.resolve(jobs);
            return deferrer.promise;
        }
    }
}
}(angular.module('app')));

you can pass a bool argument to tell weather to get local copy or fresh copy

It all depends upon the frequency of data change in back end data change and degree of tolerance of data inconsistency in your application. if the source data is changing too frequently and you can't afford inconsistent data then you have no choice other than to get fresh copy every time, but if that's not the case then you can cash data locally

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