173

Is there an easy way within C# to check to see if a DateTime instance has been assigned a value or not?

0

12 Answers 12

356

do you mean like so:

DateTime datetime = new DateTime();

if (datetime == DateTime.MinValue)
{
    //unassigned
}

or you could use Nullable

DateTime? datetime = null;

 if (!datetime.HasValue)
 {
     //unassigned
 }
2
  • 7
    Only the second of these is bullet-proof. The first assumes something about the unset representation of a DateTime that is not guaranteed by the framework. Personally I think they should have added an Unset static member for this scenario. Commented Oct 10, 2013 at 12:51
  • 22
    To add on what @RupertRawnsley said, you should actually compare with default(DateTime), which is the value of an unassigned DateTime. It just so happens to be equal to MinValue, but it could change. Commented Jan 6, 2015 at 12:48
100

The only way of having a variable which hasn't been assigned a value in C# is for it to be a local variable - in which case at compile-time you can tell that it isn't definitely assigned by trying to read from it :)

I suspect you really want Nullable<DateTime> (or DateTime? with the C# syntactic sugar) - make it null to start with and then assign a normal DateTime value (which will be converted appropriately). Then you can just compare with null (or use the HasValue property) to see whether a "real" value has been set.

4
  • 2
    how about checking if the value is equal to default datetime value. Is there any unnoticeable downside to this approach? if(request.StartDateTime == default(DateTime) { request.StartDateTime = DateTime.Now; }
    – Menol
    Commented May 13, 2016 at 8:33
  • 10
    @Menol: Well that doesn't tell the difference between a field which has deliberately been given a value of default(DateTime) and one which was just that way to start with. Basically it's treating one value within the domain as "special and unavailable for normal use" which I dislike.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented May 13, 2016 at 8:54
  • 1
    @Urasquirrel: For what, exactly? Declaring a DateTime? value with an initial value of null? That's just DateTime? variable = null; - I'm not sure what you're looking for beyond that...
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Apr 6, 2021 at 5:38
  • @JonSkeet Ok that's what I thought you meant but wasn't sure. That's what I ended up trying, I just had to read this answer a little more. Commented Apr 6, 2021 at 12:40
47

put this somewhere:

public static class DateTimeUtil //or whatever name
{
    public static bool IsEmpty(this DateTime dateTime)
    {
        return dateTime == default(DateTime);
    }
}

then:

DateTime datetime = ...;

if (datetime.IsEmpty())
{
    //unassigned
}
5
  • I like this idea, but note that in the somewhat unlikely event that the DateTime variable has been assigned a value which happens to be the default value, this extension method will return the wrong result. The only way to avoid this is to use a nullable DateTime, which has already been suggested. I still really like (and am now using) your answer though, thanks!
    – devklick
    Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 19:04
  • @Klicker : Thank you for your nice comment, but I am not sure I understand your remark. As far as I can tell == in this case will always return true when datetime is equivalent to default(DateTime) whatever is the way datetime end-up being assigned the default value. Let me explain: actually the second snippet in my answer is wrong, it won't compile, because, if you consider that this is the body of a function, then datetime is unassigned, and the compiler will refuse to use it. So you will have to assign it a value. It can be default(DateTime) directly or indirectly. I will modify my answer.
    – sonatique
    Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 22:56
  • and if in another context datetime is a member of a class, and that it is left as is, the the runtime will assign default(DateTime) to it. The == for structs actually compare the content of the struct, whatever is the way the struct end-up filled with this content.
    – sonatique
    Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 23:01
  • My point only really relates to class members, and what I mean is; if you have a class level DateTime field or property which you have assigned MinValue to, your IsEmpty method will return true, which is probably not what you would want (because it is not empty - it's been assigned the default value). I guess the name of your method would be more suited as IsDefaultValue. Since you can't really have a non-nullable DateTime that IsEmpty.
    – devklick
    Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 23:49
  • @Klicker: ah yes, OK, got it. You're right: the name I chose is misleading. IsDefaultValue would have been better
    – sonatique
    Commented Feb 5, 2019 at 10:41
7

I'd say the default value is always new DateTime(). So we can write

DateTime datetime;

if (datetime == new DateTime())
{
    //unassigned
}
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  • 3
    This Solution was already given by +Hath in 2008 and, as +Rupert Rawnsley added as comment, is not bullet-proof... Commented May 21, 2014 at 14:16
6

I just found out that GetHashCode() for an unassigned datetime is always zero. I am not sure if this is a good way to check for null datetime, because, I can't find any documentation on why this behavior is displayed.

if(dt.GetHashCode()==0)
{
    Console.WriteLine("DateTime is unassigned"); 
} 
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  • 1
    GetHashCode returns 0 because of ticks (internal representation of DateTime) are also equal to 0. Hash code calculated by the following way: unchecked((int)ticks) ^ (int)(ticks >> 32);. Also see here: referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/datetime.cs,836 Commented Mar 18, 2016 at 21:50
  • Thank you very much. I'm trying to serialize an XML file from a C# class and exclude the null attributes. This helped.
    – Jim Neff
    Commented May 30, 2019 at 12:54
6

Use Nullable<DateTime> if possible.

1
5

DateTime is value type, so it can not never be null. If you think DateTime? ( Nullable ) you can use:

DateTime? something = GetDateTime();
bool isNull = (something == null);
bool isNull2 = !something.HasValue;
2

Create class with property DateTime nullable

public class MyClass 
{
   public DateTime? DateExample { get; set; }
}

In your programming logic use:

DateTime? dateExample = null;
if (!dateExample.HasValue) 
{
    Console.WriteLine("Is Null"); // Is Null
}

dateExample = DateTime.Now;
if (dateExample.HasValue)
{
     Console.WriteLine("Is Not Null"); // Is Not Null
}
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  • I think this way is the best among them Commented Apr 28, 2022 at 7:46
1

If you don't want to have to worry about Null value issues like checking for null every time you use it or wrapping it up in some logic, and you also don't want to have to worry about offset time issues, then this is how I solved the problem:

startDate = startDate <= DateTime.MinValue.AddSeconds(1) ? keepIt : resetIt

I just check that the defaulted value is less than a day after the beginning of time. Works like a charm.

Edit 2021: If you need to check milliseconds of the beginning of time then just add ticks instead, but also maybe carbon dating is what you are really looking for. Still not sure carbon dating would even be as accurate as you need if you need accuracy to the tick.

Edit 2022:

https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/archive/msdn-magazine/2016/august/data-points-ef-core-change-tracking-behavior-unchanged-modified-and-added

IsKeySet: Added
The EntityEntry object, which holds the tracking information for each entity, has a new property called IsKeySet. IsKeySet is a great addition to the API. It checks to see if the key property in the entity has a value. This eliminates the guessing game (and related code) to see if an object already has a value in its key property (or properties if you have a composed key). IsKeySet checks to see if the value is the default value of the particular type you specified for the key property. So if it’s an int, is it 0? If it’s a Guid, is it equal to Guid.Empty (00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000)? If the value is not the default for the type, IsKeySet returns true.

If you know that in your system you can unequivocally differentiate a new object from a pre-existing object by the value of its key property, then IsKeySet is a really handy property for determining the state of entities.
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  • what about 00:00:01.0000000 UTC, January 1, 0001? Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 13:34
  • 1
    @MahdiHesari I'm not quite sure I follow. The beginning of time is a bit extreme. If you really need to know back to that point, then I recommend carbon dating? Commented Jan 27, 2021 at 15:00
  • 1
    @MahdiHesari I've updated to catch your great example down to the second from the beginning of time. Appreciate! Commented Jan 27, 2021 at 15:08
0

I generally prefer, where possible, to use the default value of value types to determine whether they've been set. This obviously isn't possible all the time, especially with ints - but for DateTimes, I think reserving the MinValue to signify that it hasn't been changed is fair enough. The benefit of this over nullables is that there's one less place where you'll get a null reference exception (and probably lots of places where you don't have to check for null before accessing it!)

0

The default value of a new DateTime that is not nullable if not assigned anything is the beginning of time "1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM". If you check the value to be that then it was not assigned a value.

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  • 1
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    – Community Bot
    Commented Oct 14, 2022 at 20:37
0

In VS 2022, using .NET8 I found out you can compare directly with the default keyword:

class MyTestClass
{
  ...
  DateTime myDateTime; // class field
  ...
  void MytestCode()
  {
    if (myDateTime == default) // Here's the test
    {
     ...
    }
  }  
}

(Not sure in what .net / vs studio this was introduced)

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