30

I got the following question from an interview.

I was given a character array like this:

char[] characters = {'u', 'a', 'u', 'i', 'o', 'f', 'u'};

I needed to get the distinct characters and counts of each character:

u = 3
a = 1
i = 1
o = 1
f = 1

So I answered in Java with the following code:

HashMap<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();
int i = 1;
for (char c : characters) {             
    if (map.containsKey(c)) {
        int val = map.get(c);
        map.put(c, ++val);
    } else map.put(c, i);
}

The interviewer was a solution architect. He asked me why I was using both containsKey() and get() methods here and noted that it was redundant to use both methods. What is his point? What was I doing wrong here? Will my code cause a performance issue, etc.?

  • 4
    The get method will return null if there's no such key in the HashMap so you can directly call it and check the result of that instead of having an additional function call, in this case containsKey. Those are at least my 2 cents on this problem. – mmvsbg May 29 '15 at 5:19
  • If you already know what key you are searching for, then why to get the key again? – Uma Kanth May 29 '15 at 5:21
  • 1
    What I see is you can remove the variable i entirely, as it is constant during the loop. – Sri Harsha Chilakapati May 29 '15 at 5:21
  • 2
    His point is that you could just call get once, and the key is present in the map if and only if the result of get is nonnull. – Louis Wasserman May 29 '15 at 5:22
  • 6
    As far as I see, all the answers so far are referring to the particular example. In general, a sequence of containsKey and get in fact CAN make sense - namely, when keys may be mapped to the value null. (It's not strictly relevant here, but I just wanted to point it out: One may not blindly replace every containsKey/get with a single get, but always has to consider whether there may be null values in the map, even if this is not the case in this example) – Marco13 May 29 '15 at 10:59

11 Answers 11

25

The architect means that get and containsKey have the same costs and may be accumulated into one check:

Integer val = map.get(c);
if (val != null) {
  ...
} else {
  ...
}

But I wonder why the architect is only concerned about that, as there are more things to improve:

  • Refer to objects by their interfaces (Effective Java 2nd Edition, Item 52)
  • Since Java 1.7 you can use the diamond operator <>
  • Accumulate the autoboxing operations of the characters
  • If you use AtomicInteger (or any other modifiable number class) instead of Integer you can even merge the get with one of the puts

So from my point of view the best performance, when using a HashMap, would offer:

Map<Character, AtomicInteger> map = new HashMap<>();
for (Character c : characters) {
    AtomicInteger val = map.get(c);
    if (val != null) {
        val.incrementAndGet();
    } else {
        map.put(c, new AtomicInteger(1));
    }
}

If the range of your characters is small (and known in advance), you could use an int array for counting. This would be the fastest of all possible solutions:

char firstCharacter = 'a';
char lastCharacter = 'z';
int[] frequency = new int[lastCharacter - firstCharacter + 1];
for (char c : characters) {
  frequency[c - firstCharacter]++;
}
  • 7
    I would be very surprised if your AtomicInteger based solution was faster. Further, now that we have Java8, this can all be done in a single line... – Boris the Spider May 29 '15 at 14:23
  • Faster than what? The original question? I would bet, as "Most efficient way to increment a Map value in Java" already explains. I know that there are even faster implementations of modifiable integers - but that would be of topic here. And code in a single line doesn't mean that it is faster. – Tobias Liefke May 29 '15 at 18:17
  • 10
    I also think AtomicInteger should be used for its primary purpose - as a concurrency utility. – mucaho May 29 '15 at 18:56
  • 1
    As long as there is not a MutableInteger in Java you have either to write your own implementation, use one from an existing library like commons-lang, or you use AtomicInteger... Nevertheless the remark about modifiable numbers was just the cherry on top - it is not the principal point of my answer. – Tobias Liefke May 29 '15 at 19:10
  • 1
    The link you provided has the most appalling benchmark - I'm going to completely ignore it. I would strongly hypothesise that Java 8's Map.merge is faster than anything one could cook up as it's designed for exactly this purpose... – Boris the Spider May 29 '15 at 19:51
18

Your code is redundant, since both get and containsKey do pretty much the same work. Instead of calling containsKey you can check whether get returns a null value.

The code can be reduced to :

HashMap<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();
for (char c : characters) {   
    Integer val = map.get(c);          
    if (val == null)
        val = 0;
    map.put(c,++val);
}
  • 2
    Even shorter: Integer val = map.get(c); map.put(c, 1 + (val == null ? 0 : val)); – Matteo Tassinari May 29 '15 at 12:32
  • As of java 7 you can use diamond operators, not sure what OP use tho. – Jean-François Savard May 29 '15 at 13:05
  • 1
    You should explain why OP's code is redundant and yours is not. – Captain Man May 29 '15 at 15:17
  • 2
    @Captain Man Well, more code is more redundant than less code, but I added an explanation to make you happy. – Eran May 29 '15 at 16:52
  • 1
    Took downvote off :) The unstated reasons I felt were truly the heart of what OP was looking for, a why instead of a how/what. – Captain Man May 29 '15 at 18:08
8

You can write your for loop like this -

for (char c : characters) {             

   Integer val = map.get(c);
   if (null != val){
      map.put(c, ++val);
   } else {
      map.put(c, 1);
   }
}  

Note: I have modified int to Integer so that I can check it against null If the map already contains a value then it returns the value and it will be assigned with your declared Integer variable val. Otherwise val will be null. So I think you don't need to use Map.containsKey() method.

7

Let's start with exactly your code, and start reducing it.

HashMap<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();
int i = 1;

for (char c : characters)
{             
    if (map.containsKey(c))
    {
        int val = map.get(c);
        map.put(c, ++val);
    }
    else map.put(c, i);
}

The first thing I'll do is to make use of the Java 7 diamond operator, and remove the variable i

Map<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap<>();

for (char c : characters)
{
    if (map.containsKey(c))
        map.put(c, ++map.get(c));
    else
        map.put(c, 1);
}

This is my first step, we have removed the variable i as it is always constant as 1 and doesn't change during the execution. I have also condensed the statement and made map.get call into the map.put call. And now, when seeing, we have three calls to the map methods.

Map<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap<>();

for (char c : characters)
{
    Integer i = map.get(c);

    if (i == null) i = 0;

    map.put(c, ++i);
}

This is the best way, and is what @Eran said in the above answer. Hope this breakdown helps.

6

Since Java 8 you can even do something like this:

final Map<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap<>();
for (char c : characters)
    map.merge(c, 1, Integer::sum);

Note that you do a lot of boxing and unboxing with this solution. This should not be a problem but it is good to be aware of it.

What the code above actually does (i.e. with manual boxing and unboxing):

for (char c : characters)
    map.merge(
        Character.valueOf(c),
        Integer.valueOf(1),
        (a, b) -> Integer.valueOf(Integer.sum(a.intValue(), b.intValue())));
6
for (char c : characters) {   
     Integer val = map.get(c);
     if(val != null){
        map.put(c, ++val); 
     }else{
        map.put(c, 1);
     }
 }

This could be the best way as

both the function get and contains do the same work...

instead of using both its good to do by using the get function

check for the null value here when you use the get function. by avoiding the two calls it would improve the performace.

Note : in this case it may not appear there is any improvement in the performance, but in the other case there is big amount of data it will.

  • Can you explain why it could be? (I know, but the reader may not.) – Captain Man May 29 '15 at 14:52
  • @CaptainMan : Thanks for reminding and hope its fine now. – Abhijit Bashetti May 30 '15 at 4:39
  • same put operation is done is if and else. That makes a duplicate line. You could increment the val and assign it in a single line. – NewUser May 30 '15 at 14:12
  • @NewUser: it can be done in single line,but code is not readable. And with if and else the makes code readable...otherwise you have add comments to make it understand the code – Abhijit Bashetti May 31 '15 at 5:34
4

What I normally do for this if you would like to put the counting of characters in Map.

Map<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap();
for (char c: cs) {
    Integer iCnt = map.get(c);
    if (iCnt ==  null) {
        map.put(c, 1);                
    } else {
        map.put(c, ++iCnt);
    }
}

Map.containsKey(key) is going to check the specified key from the map which is very similar to Map.get(key). In your code, you call both "containsKey" and "get" methods that means you will go through the entries twice, that could cause the performance issue.

2

Well, I am also a system architect and I see nothing wrong with your code, except perhaps the absence of curly brackets - you should generally always use them. This would be fine, in my opinion:

for (char c : characters) {             
    if (map.containsKey(c)) {
        int val = map.get(c);
        map.put(c, ++val);
    } else {
        map.put(c, 1);
    }
}

Personally, I would have written it like this, which is very similar to your own version:

for (char c : characters) {
    int val = map.containsKey(c) ? map.get(c) : 0;
    map.put(c, ++val);
}

Why use both containsKey() and get() ? Well, if you are only going to use get(), then you need to do a null check somehow. Which is clearer to someone else reading the code, if (map.containsKey(c)) or if (val != null)? There is very little practical difference.

Hashed lookups are O(log N), so calling get() and containsKey() causes two lookups rather than 1. If you had then gone on to talk about the performance implications of this and how it might run with an extremely large dataset then that would have been relevant.

Lastly, without a containtsKey() check, int val = map.get(c); throws npe the first time, so you would need to use Integer val = map.get(c); instead. Which is clearer, and safer - int val or Integer val? I see nothing wrong with letting autoboxing do it's thing and using int val, and I generally use primitive types over objects wherever possible, though there are probably lots of different opinions on int vs Integer.

2

Another Java 8 solution that I haven't seen represented yet:

Character[] characters = {'u', 'a', 'u', 'i', 'o', 'f', 'u'};
Map<Character, Integer> result = Arrays.asList(characters)
        .stream()
        .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(Function.identity(), Collectors.summingInt(c -> 1)));

It does require using the boxed type Character, though -- Arrays.asList doesn't play nice with char[] and Arrays.stream() doesn't have an overload for char[].

1

The problem is that containskey have to iterate through the entire entries of the Map to get the key(Iteration 1). Code for containsKey below.

public boolean containsKey(Object key) {
    return getEntry(key) != null;
}
final Entry<K,V> getEntry(Object key) {
    if (size == 0) {
        return null;
    }

    int hash = (key == null) ? 0 : hash(key);
    for (Entry<K,V> e = table[indexFor(hash, table.length)];
         e != null;
         e = e.next) {
        Object k;
        if (e.hash == hash &&
            ((k = e.key) == key || (key != null && key.equals(k))))
            return e;
    }
    return null;
}

Now get('') have to iterate again to get the value mapped by the key(Iteration 2). The code for get also calls the getEntry like below.

public V get(Object key) {
    if (key == null)
        return getForNullKey();
    Entry<K,V> entry = getEntry(key);

    return null == entry ? null : entry.getValue();
}

You are unnecessarily iterating through the Entry set 2 times when it is not required, hence performance issue. The best way is given by @Eran in the answers.

  • 7
    Map.containsKey() doesn't "iterate through the entire key set" – NamshubWriter May 29 '15 at 5:44
  • @NamshubWriter sorry for the confusion thought that entry might create a confusion thats why used the term key set modified the answer to include the correct details. – robin May 29 '15 at 6:10
  • 3
    That's just iterating through a single bucket. Only keys with the same hash value are iterated over. – Radiodef May 29 '15 at 13:39
1

The answer is very simple, indeed. Contains methods check if element is present in collection through the cycle each time. So, the larger collections is, the longer it will perform the check for every next element. Contains is useful for hashed collections, where is no possibility to get element by index. But for such intent need to override hashCode and equals correct. In such case contains will take O(1).

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