120
template<typename T>
class CConstraint
{
public:
    CConstraint()
    {
    }

    virtual ~CConstraint()
    {
    }

    template <typename TL>
    void Verify(int position, int constraints[])
    {       
    }

    template <>
    void Verify<int>(int, int[])
    {   
    }
};

Compiling this under g++ gives the following error:

Explicit specialization in non-namespace scope 'class CConstraint'

In VC, it compiles fine. Can anyone please let me know the workaround?

marked as duplicate by BЈовић c++ Nov 26 '14 at 12:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

92

VC++ is non-compliant in this case - explicit specializations have to be at namespace scope. C++03, §14.7.3/2:

An explicit specialization shall be declared in the namespace of which the template is a member, or, for member templates, in the namespace of which the enclosing class or enclosing class template is a member.
An explicit specialization of a member function, member class or static data member of a class template shall be declared in the namespace of which the class template is a member.

Additionally you have the problem that you can't specialize member functions without explicitly specializing the containing class due to C++03, §14.7.3/3, so one solution would be to let Verify() forward to a, possibly specialized, free function:

namespace detail {
    template <typename TL> void Verify     (int, int[]) {}
    template <>            void Verify<int>(int, int[]) {}
}

template<typename T> class CConstraint {
    // ...
    template <typename TL> void Verify(int position, int constraints[]) {
        detail::Verify<TL>(position, constraints);
    }
};
  • 8
    incompliant in this case: as always :) ? Templates and VC++ don't mix that well :/ – Matthieu M. Jun 16 '10 at 11:21
  • 5
    It's non-compliant in a sense that it will let you do something that the Standard normally doesn't allow - which isn't a problem for code that is conformant to begin with (you write such code, right? ~). The real conformance problems are when it won't compile something that the Standard requires to compile, or will behave differently from what is specified. – Pavel Minaev Jun 16 '10 at 22:26
  • 2
    Like the subtle pitfalls arising from the missing two-phase lookup ... :| – Georg Fritzsche Jun 16 '10 at 22:33
  • Georg, Thanks for you answer....You actually delegate type deduction to Detail::Verify, so it is not a real CConstraint::Verify, but it works.) – bruziuz Aug 17 '15 at 10:24
  • 8
    Why would the language developers do this to programmer developers? Were they thinking, How can we make this language any more difficult to read and write? – Adrian Mar 22 '17 at 1:42
85

Another way to solve it is by delegating to a private function and overloading that function. This way you still have access to member data of *this and to the outer template parameter type.

template<typename T>
struct identity { typedef T type; };

template<typename T>
class CConstraint
{
public:

  template <typename TL>
  void Verify(int position, int constraints[])
  {
    Verify(position, constraints, identity<TL>());
  }

private:
  template<typename TL>
  void Verify(int, int[], identity<TL>)
  {

  }

  void Verify(int, int[], identity<int>)
  {

  }
};
  • Thanks a lot. I was looking for this also as I need to access this. Wish I could select 2 answers. – Mark Jun 18 '10 at 3:20
  • 7
    If I were you, I'd choose this answer. @Johannes: Your answer is just perfect, thanks. – Alaa Eldin Dec 27 '12 at 9:47
  • Thank you, thank you, thank you, Johannes Schaub, for this answer. – Rethunk Jan 3 '15 at 0:48
  • 3
    This answer is a lot more useful than the accepted one. – Roel Feb 9 '16 at 10:03
  • 3
    Any changes since C++11 came around? – gipouf Dec 2 '16 at 19:23
12

Just take the template specialization outside the class declaration. gcc doesn't allow inline template specialization.

As another option, just deleting line template<> seems to work for me.

  • 1st sentence is on the money: "gcc doesn't allow inline template specialization". – Droj Oct 2 '18 at 19:28
4

Even better: you can combine partial specialisation with default template arguments. This way modification to the VC++ code are minor, because calls to the specialised function do not need to be modified.

template <typename TL, class Dummy=int>
void Verify(int position, int constraints[])
{
}

template <class Dummy=int>
void Verify<int, Dummy>(int, int[])
{
}
  • 2
    Default template arguments aren't allowed in C++03, only in C++0x/11. – Xeo Jun 2 '11 at 11:09
  • 1
    Sorry, I was wrong: you cannot partially specialise a function. – vitke Jun 2 '11 at 11:13
  • @Xeo: I guess you meant not allowed on functions in C++03? "A default template-argument is a template-argument (14.3) specified after = in a template-parameter. A default template-argument may be specified for any kind of template-parameter (type, non-type, template). A default template-argument may be specified in a class template declaration or a class template definition. A default template-argument shall not be specified in a function template declaration or a function template definition, nor in the template-parameter-list of the definition of a member of a class template." – Ben Voigt Jan 3 '18 at 21:52
1

You may not be able to explicitly specialize the member template, but you can partially specialize it. If you add a second parameter "int dummyParam" and also add it to the specialization, it should work with both compilers.

Not that I knew this more than 10 seconds ago, but googling on the same error, I ran into this link and it worked for my member template specialization.

  • 1
    You cannot partially specialize a function – metamorphosis Feb 6 '16 at 0:21

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