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I want to have a plot in my shiny app that the user can click on or choose certain regions, so I'm using the click and brush arguments of plotOutput. My problem is that when a brush is initiated, the click handler is also called. I want to know when a click is made, and I want to know when a brush is made, but if a click is part of a brush then I want to ignore it.

Example: in the following app, if you just brush (click somewhere and drag the mouse), you get a "click" message as well as a "brush" message. I want to only get the "brush" message in that case.

library(shiny)
library(ggplot2)
runApp(shinyApp(
  ui = fluidPage(
    plotOutput("plot", click = "click", brush = "brush")
  ),
  server = function(input, output, session) {
    output$plot <- renderPlot({
      ggplot(mtcars, aes(wt, mpg)) + geom_point()
    })
    observeEvent(input$click, {
      cat("clicked\n")
    })
    observeEvent(input$brush, {
      cat("brushed\n")
    })
  }
))
5
  • 1
    According to ?plotOutput there seems to be no "mouse button up" message, which you'd need to differentiate properly between clicking and brushing. One workaround is to define a timeout (say, 200 ms), treat a click event as such only after this timeout, and correspondingly ignore all brush events after this timeout. Is there a reason you don't simply listen to doubleclick events instead?
    – krlmlr
    May 29, 2015 at 11:19
  • I don't want dblclick simply because of user experience - it's much simpler and makes more sense to click. Maybe I just need to go to bed (4:30am), but I'm not sure how your suggestion will fix my issue though, I thought about it for a bit and it doesn't seem to take care of my problem
    – DeanAttali
    May 29, 2015 at 11:25
  • If the brush event occurs less than 200 ms after the last click event, you handle it. If not, you ignore it. You handle the click only 200 ms after the event, you'll have to set up some kind of timer for this.
    – krlmlr
    May 29, 2015 at 14:46
  • @daattali did you find a solution to this? I would be very interested in checking it out.
    – Sölvi
    Jul 21, 2015 at 21:35
  • 1
    No, the official answer I got was that (at least currently) there is no way to do it. I ended up using double click instead of click
    – DeanAttali
    Jul 21, 2015 at 22:24

3 Answers 3

2

I am developing a Shiny app for interactive heatmaps (https://github.com/jokergoo/InteractiveComplexHeatmap). On the heatmap, users can click on the heatmap to see the value for that cell or select a region to catch a sub-heatmap. I don't like double click on heatmap either which is very unfriendly to users.

Following is my solution to differentiate click and brush, may be helpful for you:

A runnable code:

library(shiny)
library(grid)
library(glue)
library(circlize) # only for random colors

ui = fluidPage(
    plotOutput("plot", width = 600, height = 400,
        click = "click", brush = "brush"),
    tags$script(HTML("
        $('#plot').mousedown(function(e) {
            var parentOffset = $(this).offset();
            var relX = e.pageX - parentOffset.left;
            var relY = e.pageY - parentOffset.top;
            Shiny.setInputValue('x1', relX);
            Shiny.setInputValue('y1', relY);
        }).mouseup(function(e) {
            var parentOffset = $(this).offset();
            var relX = e.pageX - parentOffset.left;
            var relY = e.pageY - parentOffset.top;
            Shiny.setInputValue('x2', relX);
            Shiny.setInputValue('y2', relY);
            Shiny.setInputValue('action', Math.random());
        });
    ")),
    fluidRow(
        column(3, htmlOutput("output1")),
        column(3, htmlOutput("output2"))
    )
)

server = function(input, output, session) {
    output$plot = renderPlot({
        grid.newpage()
        grid.rect()
    })

    observeEvent(input$action, {
        if(input$x1 == input$x2 && input$y1 == input$y2) {
            output$output1 = renderText({
                isolate(glue("
<pre style='background-color:{rand_color(1)}'>
a click:
x1 = {input$x1}
y1 = {input$y1}
x2 = {input$x2}
y2 = {input$y2}
input$click$coords_css$x = {input$click$coords_css$x}
input$click$coords_css$y = {input$click$coords_css$y}</pre>"))
            })
        } else {
            output$output2 = renderText({
                isolate(glue("
<pre style='background-color:{rand_color(1)}'>
a brush:
x1 = {input$x1}
y1 = {input$y1}
x2 = {input$x2}
y2 = {input$y2}
input$brush$coords_css$xmin = {input$brush$coords_css$xmin}
input$brush$coords_css$ymin = {input$brush$coords_css$ymin}
input$brush$coords_css$xmax = {input$brush$coords_css$xmax}
input$brush$coords_css$ymax = {input$brush$coords_css$ymax}</pre>"))
            })
        }
    })
}

shinyApp(ui, server)

And a demo is here:

shiny_brush

The idea is to compare the mouse positions at "mousedown" and "mouseup". And at "mouseup" triggers a reactive value (here is action) so that in server function, it can respond to it. (This is implemented in tags$script(...)).

As you can see in the figure, click and brush change the box colors independently, and doing brush won't affect the box for click.

1
  • Thanks @Zuguang Gu. A clever use of javaScript to transform the reactivity of mouse click to mouse-button-up instead of just mouse click. Thank you!
    – Farhad
    Jun 14, 2022 at 1:38
1

I know it's just a workaround, but my only solution for this was to undo the action of the last click when the brush is activated; I needed this for a plot where the user could add points by clicking. Using the brushing will first create the point and remove it after releasing the click button. Just a drawback: sometimes you click and do a micro-brush without noticing, in this case it won't create the point obviously. My app:

library(shiny); library(dplyr); library(ggplot2)

ui <- fluidPage(
     fluidRow(

          h1("add by clicking anywhere on the plot"),
          plotOutput("mainplot",
                     click="mainplot_click",
          brush=brushOpts(id="mainplot_brush"))
     ),
     fluidRow(
          actionButton("add", "add"),
          actionButton("reset", "reset")
     )
)

server <- function(input, output, session) {

     vals = reactiveValues(
          keeprows = rep(TRUE, nrow(mtcars)),
          mydata = mtcars
     )

     observeEvent(input$mainplot_click, handlerExpr = {
          my.x = input$mainplot_click$x
          my.y = input$mainplot_click$y
          vals$mydata <- vals$mydata %>% bind_rows(data.frame("wt"=my.x, "mpg"=my.y))
     })

     output$mainplot = renderPlot({
          temp = vals$mydata
          ggplot() +geom_point(data=temp, col="black", fill="white", size=3) + aes(x=wt, y=mpg)
     })

     observeEvent(input$mainplot_brush, handlerExpr = {
           vals$mydata <- vals$mydata %>% head(-1)
     })

     observeEvent(input$reset, handlerExpr = {
          vals$mydata <- mtcars
          vals$keeprows <- rep(TRUE, nrow(mtcars))
     })
     session$onSessionEnded(stopApp)
}

shinyApp(ui, server)
0
0

I solved this problem with a set of flags, recognizing that a drag event triggers a click (mouse down), followed by brush, followed by a second click (actually mouse up). I delay processing of the first click, then cancel the first click if I handle the brush. And if I am handling the brush, then I know that there will be a second click that I should ignore.

single.click.up <- FALSE
single.click.down <- FALSE
brush.click <- FALSE

# Brush events trigger plot1_click twice (down and up) with a brush event in between.
observe({
    input$plot1_click
    if (single.click.down) {
        if (brush.click) {
            single.click.up <<- TRUE
            message("single click down ignored")
        } else {
            message("single click down processed")
        }
        single.click.down <<- FALSE
    } else if (single.click.up) {
        message("single click up, reset brush click")
        brush.click <<- FALSE
        single.click.up <<- FALSE
    } else {
        single.click.down <<- TRUE
        invalidateLater(1000)
        message("new single click. delay.")
    }
})

observeEvent( input$plot1_brush, {
  brush.click <<- TRUE
  message("Processing brush")
})

There's probably a cleaner way to do this. And strange things could happen if events were lost or slow to be processed. But it works for me.

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