76

I'm writing a script which moves dropdown below or above input depending on height of dropdown and position of the input on the screen. Also I want to set modifier to dropdown according to its direction. But using setState inside of the componentDidUpdate creates an infinite loop(which is obvious)

I've found a solution in using getDOMNode and setting classname to dropdown directly, but i feel that there should be a better solution using React tools. Can anybody help me?

Here is a part of working code with getDOMNode (i a little bit neglected positioning logic to simplify code)

let SearchDropdown = React.createClass({
    componentDidUpdate(params) {
        let el = this.getDOMNode();
        el.classList.remove('dropDown-top');
        if(needToMoveOnTop(el)) {
            el.top = newTopValue;
            el.right = newRightValue;
            el.classList.add('dropDown-top');
        }
    },
    render() {
        let dataFeed = this.props.dataFeed;
        return (
            <DropDown >
                {dataFeed.map((data, i) => {
                    return (<DropDownRow key={response.symbol} data={data}/>);
                })}
            </DropDown>
        );
    }
});

and here is code with setstate (which creates an infinite loop)

let SearchDropdown = React.createClass({
    getInitialState() {
        return {
            top: false
        };
    },
    componentDidUpdate(params) {
        let el = this.getDOMNode();
        if (this.state.top) {
           this.setState({top: false});
        }
        if(needToMoveOnTop(el)) {
            el.top = newTopValue;
            el.right = newRightValue;
            if (!this.state.top) {
              this.setState({top: true});
           }
        }
    },
    render() {
        let dataFeed = this.props.dataFeed;
        let class = cx({'dropDown-top' : this.state.top});
        return (
            <DropDown className={class} >
                {dataFeed.map((data, i) => {
                    return (<DropDownRow key={response.symbol} data={data}/>);
                })}
            </DropDown>
        );
    }
});
  • 9
    I think the trick here is that setState will always trigger a re-render. Rather than checking state.top and calling setState multiple times, just track what you want state.top to be in a local variable, then once at the end of componentDidUpdate call setState only if your local variable doesn't match state.top. As it stands right now, you immediately reset state.top after the first re-render, which puts you in the infinite loop. – Randy Morris May 29 '15 at 13:08
  • 2
    See the two different implementations of componentDidUpdate in this fiddle. – Randy Morris May 29 '15 at 13:24
  • damn it! local variable solves the whole problem, how hadn't i figured it out by mysef! Thank you! – Katerina Pavlenko May 29 '15 at 16:07
  • if you write an answer, i'll mark it as correct – Katerina Pavlenko May 29 '15 at 16:09
  • 1
    I think you should accept the answer below. If you read it again I think you'll find it does answer the initial question sufficiently. – Randy Morris May 29 '15 at 16:10
75

You can use setStateinside componentDidUpdate. The problem is that somehow you are creating an infinite loop because there's no break condition.

Based on the fact that you need values that are provided by the browser once the component is rendered, I think your approach about using componentDidUpdate is correct, it just needs better handling of the condition that triggers the setState.

  • 4
    what do you mean by 'break condition'? checking if state is already set and not resetting it? – Katerina Pavlenko May 29 '15 at 12:43
  • I agree with this, my only additional comment would be that the adding/removing of classes is probably unnecessary in componentDidUpdate and can just be added as needed in render instead. – Randy Morris May 29 '15 at 12:44
  • but class adding/removing depends on dropdown position which is checked in in componentDidUpdate, you suggest to check it twice? And as i understand, componentDidUpdate is called AFTER render(), so it's useless to add/remove class in render() – Katerina Pavlenko May 29 '15 at 12:56
  • i have added my code with setstate, can you check it and point me to my mistake? or show me some example which wouldn't cause loop – Katerina Pavlenko May 29 '15 at 13:00
  • componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState) { if ( prevState.x!== this.state.x) { //Do Something } } – Ashok R Oct 12 '18 at 11:28
47

If you use setState inside componentDidUpdate it updates the component, resulting in a call to componentDidUpdate which subsequently calls setState again resulting in the infinite loop. You should conditionally call setState and ensure that the condition violating the call occurs eventually e.g:

componentDidUpdate: function() {
    if (condition) {
        this.setState({..})
    } else {
        //do something else
    }
}

In case you are only updating the component by sending props to it(it is not being updated by setState, except for the case inside componentDidUpdate), you can call setState inside componentWillReceiveProps instead of componentDidUpdate.

  • 1
    old question but componentWillReceiveProps is deprecated and componentWillRecieveProps should be used. You cannot setState inside this method. – Brooks DuBois Oct 25 '18 at 1:06
37

The componentDidUpdate signature is void::componentDidUpdate(previousProps, previousState). With this you will be able to test which props/state are dirty and call setState accordingly.

Example:

componentDidUpdate(previousProps, previousState) {
    if (previousProps.data !== this.props.data) {
        this.setState({/*....*/})
    }
}
  • componentDidMount doesn't have any arguments, and is only called when the component is created, so can't be used for the described purpose. – Jules Sep 7 '17 at 7:34
  • @Jules Thanks ! I used to write componentDidMount , so when I wrote the answer the famous name cascaded 😮 Again, Thanks & Great catch up! – Abdennour TOUMI Sep 7 '17 at 8:41
  • componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState) { if ( prevState.x!== this.state.x) { //Do Something } } – Ashok R Oct 12 '18 at 11:28
1

I would say that you need to check if the state already has the same value you are trying to set. If it's the same, there is no point to set state again for the same value.

Make sure to set your state like this:

let top = newValue /*true or false*/
if(top !== this.state.top){
    this.setState({top});
}
0

I had a similar problem where i have to center the toolTip. React setState in componentDidUpdate did put me in infinite loop, i tried condition it worked. But i found using in ref callback gave me simpler and clean solution, if you use inline function for ref callback you will face the null problem for every component update. So use function reference in ref callback and set the state there, which will initiate the re-render

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