4

I often find myself needing to count the number of times words appear in a number of text strings. When I do this, I want to know how many times each word, individually, appears in each text string.

I don't believe my approach is very efficient and any help you could give me would be great.

Usually, I will write a loop that (1) pulls in a text from a txt file as a text string, (2) executes another loop that loops over the words I want to count using a regular expression to check how many times the a given word appears each time pushing the count to an array, (3) prints the array of counts separated by commas to a file.

Here is an example:

#create array that holds the list of words I'm looking to count;
@word_list = qw(word1 word2 word3 word4);

#create array that holds the names of the txt files I want to count;
$data_loc = "/data/txt_files_for_counting/"
opendir(DIR1,"$data_loc")||die "CAN'T OPEN DIRECTORY";
my @file_names=readdir(DIR1);


#create place to save results;
$out_path_name = "/output/my_counts.csv";
open (OUT_FILE, ">>", $out_path_name);

#run the loops;
foreach $file(@file_names){
    if ($file=~/^\./)
        {next;}
    #Pull in text from txt filea;
    {
        $P_file = $data_loc."/".$file;
        open (B, "$P_file") or die "can't open the file: $P_file: $!"; 
        $text_of_txt_file = do {local $/; <B>}; 
        close B or die "CANNOT CLOSE $P_file: $!";      
    }

    #preserve the filename so counts are interpretable;
    print OUT_FILE $file;

    foreach $wl_word(@word_list){
        #use regular expression to search for term without any context;
        @finds_p = ();
        @finds_p = $text_of_txt_file =~ m/\b$wl_word\b/g;
        $N_finds = @finds_p;
        print OUT_FILE ",".$N_finds;
    }
    print OUT_FILE ",\n";
}
close(OUT_FILE);

I've found this approach to be very inefficient (slow) as the number of txt files and the number of words I want to count grow.

Is there a more efficient way to do this?

Is there a perl package that does this?

Could it be more efficient in python? (e.g., Is there a python package that will do this?)

Thanks!

EDIT: note, I don't want to count the number of words, rather the presence of certain words. Thus, the answer in this question "What's the fastest way to count the number of words in a string in Perl?" doesn't quite apply. Unless I'm missing something.

2

First off - what you're doing with opendir - I wouldn't and would suggest glob instead.

And otherwise - there's another useful trick. Compile a regex for your "words". The reason this is useful, is because - with a variable in a regex, it needs to recompile the regex each time - in case the variable has changed. IF it's static, then you no longer need to.

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my @words = ( "word1", "word2", "word3", "word4", "word5 word6" );
my $words_regex = join( "|", map ( quotemeta, @words  ));
$words_regex = qr/\b($words_regex)\b/;

open( my $output, ">", "/output/my_counts.csv" );

foreach my $file ( glob("/data/txt_files_for_counting") ) {
    open( my $input, "<", $file );
    my %count_of;
    while (<$input>) {
        foreach my $match (m/$words_regex/g) {
            $count_of{$match}++;
        }
    }
    print {$output} $file, "\n";
    foreach my $word (@words) {
        print {$output} $word, " => ", $count_of{$word} // 0, "\n"; 
    }
    close ( $input );
}

With this approach - you no longer need to 'slurp' the whole file into memory in order to process it. (Which may not be as big an advantage, depending how large the files are).

When fed data of:

word1
word2
word3 word4 word5 word6 word2 word5 word4
word4 word5 word word 45 sdasdfasf
word5 word6 
sdfasdf
sadf

Outputs:

word1 => 1
word2 => 2
word3 => 1
word4 => 3
word5 word6 => 2

I will note however - if you have overlapping substrings in your regex, then this won't work as is - it's possible though, you just need a different regex.

  • 1
    So many open calls warrants a use autodie – Borodin May 29 '15 at 14:29
  • @Sobrique, two follow up questions. This is creating a hash where each key is a word from the word list, correct? Will this handle word phrases "word5 word6 word7" in the word list as well? – user1500158 May 29 '15 at 14:33
  • Essentially, yes. It will handle phrases, too because it's 'keying' off the regular expression match. (Although, you can't use qw any more then :)) - although bear in mind because of the way regexes work, this won't work initially with overlapping phrases. – Sobrique May 29 '15 at 14:35
3

Here's my take on how your code should be written. I'll spend a while explaining my choices and then update

  • Always use strict and use warnings at the top of every Perl program that you write. You will also have to declare every variable using my as close as possible to its first point of use. It is an essential habit to get into as it will reveal many simple errors. They are also mandatory before you ask for help, as without them you will be seen to be negligent

  • Don't comment source code that is self-evident. The encouragement to comment everything is a legacy from the 1970s, and has become an excuse for writing poor code. Most of the time, using identifiers and whitespace correctly will explain the function of your program far better than any comment

  • You are correct to use the three-parameter form of open, but you should also use lexical file handles. And it is vital to check the result of every open and call die if it fails if the program cannot reasonably continue without access to the file. The die string must include the value of the variable $! to say why the open failed

  • If your program opens many files then it is often more convenient to use the autodie pragma, which implicitly checks every IO operation for you

  • You should read perldoc perlstyle to familiarise yourself with the format that most Perl prgrammers are comfortable with. Artifacts like

    if ($file=~/^\./)
            {next;}
    

    should be simply

    next if $file =~ /^\./;
    
  • You have caught onto the do { local $/; ... } idiom to read an entire file into memory but you have limited its scope. Your block

    {
        $P_file = $data_loc."/".$file;
        open (B, "$P_file") or die "can't open the file: $P_file: $!";
        $text_of_txt_file = do {local $/; <B>}; 
        close B or die "CANNOT CLOSE $P_file: $!";      
    }
    

    is better written

    my $text_of_txt_file = do {
      open my $fh, '<', $file;
      local $/;
      <$fh>;
    };
    
  • Rather than looping over a list of words, it is faster and more concise to build a regular expression from your word list. My program below shows this

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;
use autodie;

use constant DATA_LOC    => '/data/txt_files_for_counting/';
use constant OUTPUT_FILE => '/output/my_counts.csv';

my @word_list = qw(word1 word2 word3 word4);
my $word_re   = join '|', map quotemeta, @word_list;
$word_re      = qr/$word_re/;

chdir DATA_LOC;

my @text_files = grep -f, glob '*.*';

my @find_counts;

for my $file ( @text_files ) {

  next if $file =~ /^\./;

  my $text = do {
    open my $in_fh, '<', $file;
    local $/;
    <$in_fh>
  }; 

  my $n_finds = $text =~ /\b$word_re\b/g;
  push @find_counts, $n_finds;
}

open my $out_fh, '>', OUTPUT_FILE;
print $out_fh join(',', @find_counts), "\n";
close $out_fh;
  • You are not able to count the occurances of each word with this, only the total number of hits for all words per file. That's not what the example output had. – simbabque May 29 '15 at 15:00
  • @simbabque: Ye, the original prints the filename (without a following separator) and a list of word counts separated with commas and ending with a comma and a newline. I didn't really want to reproduce that, and I doubt if it's even close to what the OP needs – Borodin May 29 '15 at 15:04
  • @Borodin I do need a CSV that has the counts for each word, not just the count of whether any of the words appear in the text string. – user1500158 May 29 '15 at 15:12
  • @Borodin, Thanks for all of the advice! – user1500158 May 29 '15 at 15:12
  • @user1500158: So presumbaly you want a comma after the file name (which may itself contain commas?) and no comma after the last word count? Is it okay for the counts to appear in isolation, without any way of tying them to their corresponding word? – Borodin May 29 '15 at 15:18
0

If you have words separated by spaces use a collections.Counter dict using python to count all words:

from collections import Counter

with open("in.txt") as f:
    counts = Counter(word for line in f for word in line.split())

Then access by key to get the count of how many times each word appears for whatever words you want:

 print(counts["foo"])
 print(count["bar"])
 .....

So one pass over the words in the file and you can get the count for all the words so if you have 1 or 10000 words to count you only have to build the dict once. Unlike normal dicts any words/key that you try to access that are not in the dict won't raise a keyerror, 0 will be returned instead.

If you wanted only certain words to be stored using a set to store the words you want to keep and doing a lookup for each word:

from collections import Counter
words = {"foo","bar","foobar"}
with open("out.txt") as f:
    counts = Counter(word for line in f for word in line.split() if word in words)

That would only store the count for the words in words, set lookups are on average 0(1).

If you wanted to search for a phrase then you could use sum and in but you would have to do it for each phrase so multiple passes over the file:

with open("in.txt") as f:
    count = sum("word1 word2 word3"  in line for line in f)
  • Cool! Definitely will look into this. – user1500158 May 29 '15 at 14:19
  • @user1500158, if you had one word per line you would use counts = Counter(word.rstrip() for word in f – Padraic Cunningham May 29 '15 at 14:20
  • If I had word phrases (e.g., "word1 word2 word3" I was looking for, this wouldn't work, right? – user1500158 May 29 '15 at 14:22
  • @user1500158, it would be possible but would depend on the format of your file, if you were looking for phrases then a regex would probably be more appropriate, you could compile the regex to speed up the search – Padraic Cunningham May 29 '15 at 14:24
0

Your biggest bottleneck is the speed at which data are read from the storage medium. Using a small number of parallel processes, your program may be able to read one file while processing others, thus speeding up the process. This is unlikely to yield any benefits unless the files themselves are large.

Keep in mind, overlapping strings are hard. The code below prefers the longest match.

Non-parallelized version

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Spec::Functions qw( catfile );
use Text::CSV_XS;

die "Need directory and extension\n" unless @ARGV == 2;
my ($data_dir, $ext) = @ARGV;

my $pat = join('|',
    map quotemeta,
    sort { (length($b) <=> length($a)) }
    my @words = (
        'Visual Studio',
        'INCLUDE',
        'Visual',
    )
);

my $csv= Text::CSV_XS->new;

opendir my $dir, $data_dir
    or die "Cannot open directory: '$data_dir': $!";

my %wanted_words;

while (my $file = readdir $dir) {
    next unless $file =~ /[.]\Q$ext\E\z/;
    my $path = catfile($data_dir, $file);
    next unless -f $path;
    open my $fh, '<', $path
        or die "Cannot open '$path': $!";
    my $contents = do { local $/; <$fh> };
    close $fh
        or die "Cannot close '$path': $!";
    while ($contents =~ /($pat)/go) {
        $wanted_words{ $file }{ $1 } += 1;
    }
}

for my $file (sort keys %wanted_words) {
    my $file_counts = $wanted_words{ $file };
    my @fields = ($file, sort keys %$file_counts);
    $csv->combine(@fields)
        or die "Failed to combine [@fields]";
    print $csv->string, "\n";
}

For a test, I ran the script in a directory containing some temporary batch files from a Boost installation:

C:\...\Temp> perl count.pl . cmdb2_msvc_14.0_vcvarsall_amd64.cmd,INCLUDE,"Visual Studio"
b2_msvc_14.0_vcvarsall_x86.cmd,INCLUDE,"Visual Studio"
b2_msvc_14.0_vcvarsall_x86_arm.cmd,INCLUDE,"Visual Studio"

That is, all occurrences of "Visual" are ignored in favor of "Visual Studio".

For generating CSV output, you should use the combine method in Text::CSV_XS, instead of using join(',' ...).

Version using Parallel::ForkManager

Whether this will get anything done faster depends on the sizes of the input files, and the speed of the storage medium. If there is an improvement, the right number of processes is likely to be between N/2 to N where N is the number of cores. I did not test this.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Spec::Functions qw( catfile );
use Parallel::ForkManager;
use Text::CSV_XS;

die "Need number of processes, directory, and extension\n" unless @ARGV == 3;
my ($procs, $data_dir, $ext) = @ARGV;

my $pat = join('|',
    map quotemeta,
    sort { (length($b) <=> length($a)) }
    my @words = (
        'Visual Studio',
        'INCLUDE',
        'Visual',
    )
);

my $csv= Text::CSV_XS->new;

opendir my $dir, $data_dir
    or die "Cannot open directory: '$data_dir': $!";

my $fm = Parallel::ForkManager->new($procs);

ENTRY:
while (my $file = readdir $dir) {
    next unless $file =~ /[.]\Q$ext\E\z/;
    my $path = catfile($data_dir, $file);
    next unless -f $path;
    my $pid = $fm->start and next ENTRY;

    my %wanted_words;
    open my $fh, '<', $path
        or die "Cannot open '$path': $!";
    my $contents = do { local $/; <$fh> };
    close $fh
        or die "Cannot close '$path': $!";
    while ($contents =~ /($pat)/go) {
        $wanted_words{ $1 } += 1;
    }
    my @fields = ($file, sort keys %wanted_words);
    $csv->combine(@fields)
        or die "Failed to combine [@fields]";
    print $csv->string, "\n";
    $fm->finish;
}

$fm->wait_all_children;
-3

I would rather prefer using one-liner:

$ for file in /data/txt_files_for_counting/*; do perl -F'/\W+/' -nale 'BEGIN { @w = qw(word1 word2 word3 word4) } $h{$_}++ for map { $w = lc $_; grep { $_ eq $w } @w } @F; END { print join ",", $ARGV, map { $h{$_} || 0 } @w; }' "$file"; done

  • 2
    I wouldn't - that's exactly the kind of thing that gives perl a bad rep as a write-only language. – Sobrique May 29 '15 at 14:52
  • 1
    Why on earth would you prefer to write that? – Borodin May 29 '15 at 14:55
  • For portability: First, I don't want these input file path and search words to be involved in a script file. They should be passed from outside. Second, couting words doesn't appear to the ultimate goal for me. The output of this script could be compared with other files. – ernix May 29 '15 at 15:43

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