208

For some reason I can't find a way to get the equivalents of sqlite's interactive shell commands:

.tables
.dump

using the Python sqlite3 API.

Is there anything like that?

3
  • 1
    I suggest renaming the question to something non python specific since the answer is actually universal to interfaces that use SQL.
    – unode
    Nov 11, 2010 at 16:34
  • 2
    True, although I was expecting a python API when asking it. I'll try to find the right name.
    – noamtm
    Nov 15, 2010 at 8:54
  • 3
    If wanting to show tables from the sqlite3 command prompt, refer to stackoverflow.com/questions/82875/…. If using Python package sqlite3, see Davoud Taghawi-Nejad's answer here. I suggest the OP add Python back into the question title and select Davoud's answer. I found this page by googling "show tables Python sqlite3" since Google knows the old question title. Searches within SO would fail to land here. Without the Python angle, the linked duplicate question 82875 has received far more crowd wisdom. Dec 7, 2014 at 17:13

12 Answers 12

340

In Python:

con = sqlite3.connect('database.db')
cursor = con.cursor()
cursor.execute("SELECT name FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='table';")
print(cursor.fetchall())

Watch out for my other answer. There is a much faster way using pandas.

5
  • 22
    For users coming to copy/paste: Be sure to cursor.close() and db.close()
    – T.Woody
    Dec 8, 2018 at 19:31
  • 2
    This seems to be the correct answer yet the OP approved another one...
    – a_a_a
    Jan 2, 2020 at 9:44
  • 3
    @a_a_a Umm 4 year difference?
    – Mooncrater
    Feb 14, 2020 at 5:47
  • this seems to be the simplest but - import sqlite3 first if you are cutting and pasting
    – MT1
    Aug 29, 2023 at 10:13
  • Is ';' optional at SQL?
    – Cloud Cho
    Dec 15, 2023 at 18:39
111

You can fetch the list of tables and schemata by querying the SQLITE_MASTER table:

sqlite> .tab
job         snmptarget  t1          t2          t3        
sqlite> select name from sqlite_master where type = 'table';
job
t1
t2
snmptarget
t3

sqlite> .schema job
CREATE TABLE job (
    id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    data VARCHAR
);
sqlite> select sql from sqlite_master where type = 'table' and name = 'job';
CREATE TABLE job (
    id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    data VARCHAR
)
6
  • 2
    sqlite> .schema job invalid syntax in python...what am I missing?
    – jbuddy_13
    Apr 23, 2020 at 15:34
  • 1
    @jbuddy_13 see the other answer
    – Pro Q
    May 24, 2020 at 5:50
  • 1
    @jbuddy_13 sqlite> is the sqlite command line client prompt. The purpose of the example was to demonstrate how one could query the database to list tables and schema. May 25, 2020 at 16:11
  • 15
    sorry but i really dont know why this is the accepted answer, the question is specific for python not SQL language Nov 2, 2020 at 8:53
  • @KostasMarkakis is it really that difficult to imagine how the information I listed might lead to a solution using the API? Feb 15, 2021 at 17:02
96

The FASTEST way of doing this in python is using Pandas (version 0.16 and up).

Dump one table:

db = sqlite3.connect('database.db')
table = pd.read_sql_query("SELECT * from table_name", db)
table.to_csv(table_name + '.csv', index_label='index')

Dump all tables:

import sqlite3
import pandas as pd


def to_csv():
    db = sqlite3.connect('database.db')
    cursor = db.cursor()
    cursor.execute("SELECT name FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='table';")
    tables = cursor.fetchall()
    for table_name in tables:
        table_name = table_name[0]
        table = pd.read_sql_query("SELECT * from %s" % table_name, db)
        table.to_csv(table_name + '.csv', index_label='index')
    cursor.close()
    db.close()
3
  • 5
    For users coming to copy/paste: Be sure to cursor.close() and db.close().
    – T.Woody
    Dec 8, 2018 at 19:31
  • 11
    or better use with sqlite3.connect('database.db') as db:
    – frans
    Jul 16, 2019 at 5:31
  • How come you are using pandas and "shortcutting" the cursor? Aren't we supposed to use the cursor for querying the database?!!
    – Ash
    Aug 1, 2023 at 16:18
37

I'm not familiar with the Python API but you can always use

SELECT * FROM sqlite_master;
29

Here's a short and simple python program to print out the table names and the column names for those tables (python 2. python 3 follows).

import sqlite3

db_filename = 'database.sqlite'
newline_indent = '\n   '

db=sqlite3.connect(db_filename)
db.text_factory = str
cur = db.cursor()

result = cur.execute("SELECT name FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='table';").fetchall()
table_names = sorted(zip(*result)[0])
print "\ntables are:"+newline_indent+newline_indent.join(table_names)

for table_name in table_names:
    result = cur.execute("PRAGMA table_info('%s')" % table_name).fetchall()
    column_names = zip(*result)[1]
    print ("\ncolumn names for %s:" % table_name)+newline_indent+(newline_indent.join(column_names))

db.close()
print "\nexiting."

(EDIT: I have been getting periodic vote-ups on this, so here is the python3 version for people who are finding this answer)

import sqlite3

db_filename = 'database.sqlite'
newline_indent = '\n   '

db=sqlite3.connect(db_filename)
db.text_factory = str
cur = db.cursor()

result = cur.execute("SELECT name FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='table';").fetchall()
table_names = sorted(list(zip(*result))[0])
print ("\ntables are:"+newline_indent+newline_indent.join(table_names))

for table_name in table_names:
    result = cur.execute("PRAGMA table_info('%s')" % table_name).fetchall()
    column_names = list(zip(*result))[1]
    print (("\ncolumn names for %s:" % table_name)
           +newline_indent
           +(newline_indent.join(column_names)))

db.close()
print ("\nexiting.")
0
27

If someone wants to do the same thing with Pandas

import pandas as pd
import sqlite3
conn = sqlite3.connect("db.sqlite3")
table = pd.read_sql_query("SELECT name FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='table'", conn)
print(table)
3
  • 1
    Jupyter Notebook and Pandas are not required to answer this question
    – woggioni
    Feb 8, 2020 at 18:41
  • No need to slam such a useful answer. Although, as usual, a context manager is recommended.
    – user66081
    May 24, 2020 at 9:27
  • I find this to be the cleanest and most useful answer.
    – NL23codes
    Jun 22, 2020 at 15:18
19

Apparently the version of sqlite3 included in Python 2.6 has this ability: http://docs.python.org/dev/library/sqlite3.html

# Convert file existing_db.db to SQL dump file dump.sql
import sqlite3, os

con = sqlite3.connect('existing_db.db')
with open('dump.sql', 'w') as f:
    for line in con.iterdump():
        f.write('%s\n' % line)
3
  • 1
    Be careful with this, it will print all the data in your tables if they are populated with INSERT INTO statements!
    – RobinL
    Dec 22, 2013 at 10:45
  • Thankfully, INSERT INTO statements are single line so easy to escape with if line.startswith("INSERT INTO") ...
    – ViFI
    Dec 29, 2020 at 21:22
  • This works for me and answers the OP's question - how to get a dump file
    – MT1
    Aug 29, 2023 at 10:21
8

Some might find my function useful if you just want to print out all of the tables and columns in your db.

In the loop, I query each TABLE with LIMIT 0 so it just returns the header info without all the data. You make an empty df out of it, and use the iterable df.columns to print each column name out.

conn = sqlite3.connect('example.db')
c = conn.cursor()

def table_info(c, conn):
    '''
    prints out all of the columns of every table in db
    c : cursor object
    conn : database connection object
    '''
    tables = c.execute("SELECT name FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='table';").fetchall()
    for table_name in tables:
        table_name = table_name[0] # tables is a list of single item tuples
        table = pd.read_sql_query("SELECT * from {} LIMIT 0".format(table_name), conn)
        print(table_name)
        for col in table.columns:
            print('\t' + col)
        print()

table_info(c, conn)
Results will be:

table1
    column1
    column2

table2
    column1
    column2
    column3 

etc.
1
  • Since this post is for newer programmers you could include the import statements import sqlite3 import pandas as pd
    – Tim
    Mar 9, 2022 at 16:41
7

After a lot of fiddling I found a better answer at sqlite docs for listing the metadata for the table, even attached databases.

meta = cursor.execute("PRAGMA table_info('Job')")
for r in meta:
    print r

The key information is to prefix table_info, not my_table with the attachment handle name.

1
  • I got lots of errors in the snippet you wrote, and don't see e.g. "db_alias" in either the referenced docs or in other examples. In the context of the other examples, I think you want this line, for e.g. the Job table: meta = cursor.execute("PRAGMA table_info('Job')") And your first line seems unrelated to the rest.
    – nealmcb
    Jan 4, 2015 at 18:41
2

Check out here for dump. It seems there is a dump function in the library sqlite3.

1
  • I'm trying: import sqlite3 con = sqlite3.connect("test.db") con.dump() It fails... I keep checking
    – Angel
    Nov 20, 2008 at 20:47
2
#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

if __name__ == "__main__":

   import sqlite3

   dbname = './db/database.db'
   try:
      print "INITILIZATION..."
      con = sqlite3.connect(dbname)
      cursor = con.cursor()
      cursor.execute("SELECT name FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='table';")
      tables = cursor.fetchall()
      for tbl in tables:
         print "\n########  "+tbl[0]+"  ########"
         cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM "+tbl[0]+";")
         rows = cursor.fetchall()
         for row in rows:
            print row
      print(cursor.fetchall())
   except KeyboardInterrupt:
      print "\nClean Exit By user"
   finally:
      print "\nFinally"
0

I've implemented a sqlite table schema parser in PHP, you may check here: https://github.com/c9s/LazyRecord/blob/master/src/LazyRecord/TableParser/SqliteTableDefinitionParser.php

You can use this definition parser to parse the definitions like the code below:

$parser = new SqliteTableDefinitionParser;
$parser->parseColumnDefinitions('x INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, y DOUBLE, z DATETIME default \'2011-11-10\', name VARCHAR(100)');

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