16

c code:

// program break mechanism
// TLPI exercise 7-1

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void program_break_test() {
    printf("%10p\n", sbrk(0));

    char *bl = malloc(1024 * 1024);
    printf("%x\n", sbrk(0));

    free(bl);
    printf("%x\n", sbrk(0));

}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    program_break_test();
    return 0;
}

When compiling following code:

 printf("%10p\n", sbrk(0));

I get warning tip:

format ‘%p’ expects argument of type ‘void *’, but argument 2 has type ‘int’

Question 1: Why is that?


And after I malloc(1024 * 1024), it seems the program break didn't change.

Here is the output:

9b12000
9b12000
9b12000

Question 2: Does the process allocate memory on heap when start for future use? Or the compiler change the time point to allocate? Otherwise, why?


[update] Summary: brk() or mmap()

After reviewing TLPI and check man page (with help from author of TLPI), now I understand how malloc() decide to use brk() or mmap(), as following:

mallopt() could set parameters to control behavior of malloc(), and there is a parameter named M_MMAP_THRESHOLD, in general:

  • If requested memory is less than it, brk() will be used;
  • If requested memory is larger than or equals to it, mmap() will be used;

The default value of the parameter is 128kb (on my system), but in my testing program I used 1Mb, so mmap() was chosen, when I changed requested memory to 32kb, I saw brk() would be used.

The book mentioned that in TLPI page 147 and 1035, but I didn't read carefully of that part.

Detailed info of the parameter could be found in man page for mallopt().

  • 3
    #include <unistd.h>? – JS1 May 30 '15 at 5:03
  • @JS1 Yes, that solved the issue, can you give an explaination, I am new to linux programming... – Eric Wang May 30 '15 at 5:05
  • 2
    You need the prototype for sbrk() which is in unistd.h. Without a prototype, the compiler assumes that unknown functions return int. – JS1 May 30 '15 at 5:06
  • @JS1 Yeah, I thought sbrk() was declared in stdlib.h, thank you! – Eric Wang May 30 '15 at 5:08
  • 1
    @EricWang: It would give a warning if you compiled with -Wall (assuming you're using gcc or clang). You should always compile with -Wall. – rici May 30 '15 at 5:24
13

If we change the program to see where the malloc'd memory is:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void program_break_test() {
  printf("%10p\n", sbrk(0));

  char *bl = malloc(1024 * 1024);
  printf("%10p\n", sbrk(0));
  printf("malloc'd at: %10p\n", bl);

  free(bl);
  printf("%10p\n", sbrk(0));

}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  program_break_test();
  return 0;
}

It's perhaps a bit clearer that sbrk wouldn't change. The memory given to us by malloc is being mapped into a wildly different location.

You could also use strace on Linux to see what system calls are made, and find out that malloc is using mmap to perform the allocation.

  • I found that there is a THRESHOLD to control whether use brk() or mmap(), I updated that in the question. – Eric Wang Jun 3 '15 at 16:58
2

malloc is not limited to using sbrk to allocate memory. It might, for example, use mmap to map a large MAP_ANONYMOUS block of memory; normally mmap will assign a virtual address well away from the data segment.

There are other possibilities, too. In particular, mmap, being a core part of the standard library, is not itself limited to standard library functions; it can make use of operating-system-specific interfaces.

2

If you use malloc in your code, it will call brk() at the beginning, allocated 0x21000 bytes from the heap, that's the address you printed, so the Question 1: the following mallocs requirements can be meet from the pre-allocated space, so these mallocs actually did't call brk, it is a optimization in malloc. If next time you want to malloc size beyond that boundary, a new brk will be called (if not large than the mmap threshold).

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