I've seen a few examples of this but all of those seem to rely on knowing which element you want to count the occurrences of. My array is generated dynamically so I have no way of knowing which element I want to count the occurrences of (I want to count the occurrences of all of them). Can anyone advise?

Thanks in advance

EDIT:

Perhaps I should have been clearer, the array will contain multiple different strings (e.g. ["FOO", "FOO", "BAR", "FOOBAR"]

How can I count the occurrences of foo, bar and foobar without knowing what they are in advance?

  • Don't confuse a Swift array with NSArray. These are not the same. – Juan Catalan May 30 '15 at 20:44

10 Answers 10

up vote 65 down vote accepted

Swift 3 and Swift 2:

You can use a dictionary of type [String: Int] to build up counts for each of the items in your [String]:

let arr = ["FOO", "FOO", "BAR", "FOOBAR"]
var counts: [String: Int] = [:]

for item in arr {
    counts[item] = (counts[item] ?? 0) + 1
}

print(counts)  // "[BAR: 1, FOOBAR: 1, FOO: 2]"

for (key, value) in counts {
    print("\(key) occurs \(value) time(s)")
}

output:

BAR occurs 1 time(s)
FOOBAR occurs 1 time(s)
FOO occurs 2 time(s)

Swift 4:

Swift 4 introduces (SE-0165) the ability to include a default value with a dictionary lookup, and the resulting value can be mutated with operations such as += and -=, so:

counts[item] = (counts[item] ?? 0) + 1

becomes:

counts[item, default: 0] += 1

That makes it easy to do the counting operation in one concise line using forEach:

let arr = ["FOO", "FOO", "BAR", "FOOBAR"]
var counts: [String: Int] = [:]

arr.forEach { counts[$0, default: 0] += 1 }

print(counts)  // "["FOOBAR": 1, "FOO": 2, "BAR": 1]"

Swift 4: reduce(into:_:)

Swift 4 introduces a new version of reduce that uses an inout variable to accumulate the results. Using that, the creation of the counts truly becomes a single line:

let arr = ["FOO", "FOO", "BAR", "FOOBAR"]
let counts = arr.reduce(into: [:]) { counts, word in counts[word, default: 0] += 1 }

print(counts)  // ["BAR": 1, "FOOBAR": 1, "FOO": 2]

Or using the default parameters:

let counts = arr.reduce(into: [:]) { $0[$1, default: 0] += 1 }

Finally you can make this an extension of Array so that it can be called on any array containing Hashable items:

extension Array where Element: Hashable {
    var histogram: [Element: Int] {
        return self.reduce(into: [:]) { counts, elem in counts[elem, default: 0] += 1 }
    }
}

This idea was borrowed from this question although I changed it to a computed property.

  • 3
    Dictionary look ups return an optional value because the key might not exist in the dictionary. You need to unwrap that optional to use it. Here, I use the nil coalescing operator ?? which says unwrap the value if there is one, otherwise use the provided default 0. The first time we encounter a string, it won't be in the counts dictionary yet, so count["FOO"] will return nil which ?? converts to 0. The next time we encounter "FOO", count["FOO"] will return Optional(1) which ?? will unwrap to 1. – vacawama May 30 '15 at 12:23
array.filter{$0 == element}.count
  • 1
    Why people don't consider this the best answer is completely beyond me. – ClayJ Aug 29 '17 at 0:42
  • 1
    Most concise answer by far – 36 By Design Sep 29 '17 at 16:56

With Swift 4, according to your needs, you may choose one of the 6 following Playground codes to count the occurrences of hashable items in an array.


#1. Using Array reduce(into:_:) and Dictionary subscript(_:default:) (requires Swift 4)

let array = [4, 23, 97, 97, 97, 23]
let dictionary = array.reduce(into: [:]) { counts, number in
    counts[number, default: 0] += 1
}
print(dictionary) // [4: 1, 23: 2, 97: 3]

#2. Using repeatElement(_:count:) function, zip(_:_:) function, Dictionary init(_:uniquingKeysWith:)initializer and returning a Dictionary (requires Swift 4)

let array = [4, 23, 97, 97, 97, 23]

let repeated = repeatElement(1, count: array.count)
//let repeated = Array(repeating: 1, count: array.count) // also works

let zipSequence = zip(array, repeated)

let dictionary = Dictionary(zipSequence, uniquingKeysWith: { (current, new) in
    return current + new
})
//let dictionary = Dictionary(zipSequence, uniquingKeysWith: +) // also works

print(dictionary) // prints [4: 1, 23: 2, 97: 3]

#3. Using a Dictionary init(grouping:by:) initializer and returning an Array of tuples (requires Swift 4)

let array = [4, 23, 97, 97, 97, 23]

let dictionary = Dictionary(grouping: array, by: { $0 })

let newArray = dictionary.map { (key: Int, value: [Int]) in
    return (key, value.count)
}

print(newArray) // prints: [(4, 1), (23, 2), (97, 3)]

#4. Using a for loop and returning a Dictionary

extension Array where Element: Hashable {

    func countForElements() -> [Element: Int] {
        var counts = [Element: Int]()
        for element in self {
            counts[element] = (counts[element] ?? 0) + 1
        }
        return counts
    }

}

let array = [4, 23, 97, 97, 97, 23]
print(array.countForElements()) // prints [4: 1, 23: 2, 97: 3]

#5. Using NSCountedSet, map method and returning an Array of tuples (requires Foundation)

import Foundation

extension Array where Element: Hashable {

    func countForElements() -> [(Element, Int)] {
        let countedSet = NSCountedSet(array: self)
        let res = countedSet.objectEnumerator().map { (object: Any) -> (Element, Int) in
            return (object as! Element, countedSet.count(for: object))
        }
        return res
    }

}

let array = [4, 23, 97, 97, 97, 23]
print(array.countForElements()) // prints [(97, 3), (4, 1), (23, 2)]

#6. Using NSCountedSet, AnyIterator and returning an Array of tuples (requires Foundation)

import Foundation

extension Array where Element: Hashable {

    func counForElements() -> Array<(Element, Int)> {
        let countedSet = NSCountedSet(array: self)
        var countedSetIterator = countedSet.objectEnumerator().makeIterator()
        let anyIterator = AnyIterator<(Element, Int)> {
            guard let element = countedSetIterator.next() as? Element else { return nil }
            return (element, countedSet.count(for: element))
        }
        return Array<(Element, Int)>(anyIterator)
    }

}

let array = [4, 23, 97, 97, 97, 23]
print(array.counForElements()) // [(97, 3), (4, 1), (23, 2)]

Credits:

I updated oisdk's answer to Swift2.

16/04/14 I updated this code to Swift2.2

16/10/11 updated to Swift3


Hashable:

extension Sequence where Self.Iterator.Element: Hashable {
    private typealias Element = Self.Iterator.Element

    func freq() -> [Element: Int] {
        return reduce([:]) { (accu: [Element: Int], element) in
            var accu = accu
            accu[element] = accu[element]?.advanced(by: 1) ?? 1
            return accu
        }
    }
}

Equatable:

extension Sequence where Self.Iterator.Element: Equatable {
    private typealias Element = Self.Iterator.Element

    func freqTuple() -> [(element: Element, count: Int)] {

        let empty: [(Element, Int)] = []

        return reduce(empty) { (accu: [(Element, Int)], element) in
            var accu = accu
            for (index, value) in accu.enumerated() {
                if value.0 == element {
                    accu[index].1 += 1
                    return accu
                }
            }

            return accu + [(element, 1)]
        }
    }
}

Usage

let arr = ["a", "a", "a", "a", "b", "b", "c"]
print(arr.freq()) // ["b": 2, "a": 4, "c": 1]
print(arr.freqTuple()) // [("a", 4), ("b", 2), ("c", 1)]

for (k, v) in arr.freq() {
    print("\(k) -> \(v) time(s)")
}
// b -> 2 time(s)
// a -> 4 time(s)
// c -> 1 time(s)

for (element, count) in arr.freqTuple() {
    print("\(element) -> \(count) time(s)")
}
// a -> 4 time(s)
// b -> 2 time(s)
// c -> 1 time(s)
  • 1
    A nice solution - and one I borrowed - but unfortunately the Swift syntax is being changed soon (for v.3) to disallow var in function parameters. I've tried fixing it, but have had no luck so far... – MassivePenguin Mar 29 '16 at 20:23
  • 1
    @MassivePenguin Thanks! I updated this answer to Swift2.2. Please use this :) – ken0nek Apr 14 '16 at 8:50

Use an NSCountedSet. In Objective-C:

NSCountedSet* countedSet = [[NSCountedSet alloc] initWithArray:array];
for (NSString* string in countedSet)
    NSLog (@"String %@ occurs %zd times", string, [countedSet countForObject:string]);

I assume that you can translate this into Swift yourself.

How about:

func freq<S: SequenceType where S.Generator.Element: Hashable>(seq: S) -> [S.Generator.Element:Int] {

  return reduce(seq, [:]) {

    (var accu: [S.Generator.Element:Int], element) in
    accu[element] = accu[element]?.successor() ?? 1
    return accu

  }
}

freq(["FOO", "FOO", "BAR", "FOOBAR"]) // ["BAR": 1, "FOOBAR": 1, "FOO": 2]

It's generic, so it'll work with whatever your element is, as long as it's hashable:

freq([1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3]) // [2: 1, 3: 2, 1: 3]

freq([true, true, true, false, true]) // [false: 1, true: 4]

And, if you can't make your elements hashable, you could do it with tuples:

func freq<S: SequenceType where S.Generator.Element: Equatable>(seq: S) -> [(S.Generator.Element, Int)] {

  let empty: [(S.Generator.Element, Int)] = []

  return reduce(seq, empty) {

    (var accu: [(S.Generator.Element,Int)], element) in

    for (index, value) in enumerate(accu) {
      if value.0 == element {
        accu[index].1++
        return accu
      }
    }

    return accu + [(element, 1)]

  }
}

freq(["a", "a", "a", "b", "b"]) // [("a", 3), ("b", 2)]

I like to avoid inner loops and use .map as much as possible. So if we have an array of string, we can do the following to count the occurrences

var occurances = ["tuples", "are", "awesome", "tuples", "are", "cool", "tuples", "tuples", "tuples", "shades"]

var dict:[String:Int] = [:]

occurances.map{
    if let val: Int = dict[$0]  {
        dict[$0] = val+1
    } else {
        dict[$0] = 1
    }
}

prints

["tuples": 5, "awesome": 1, "are": 2, "cool": 1, "shades": 1]

An other approach would be to use the filter method. I find that the most elegant

var numberOfOccurenses = countedItems.filter(
{
    if $0 == "FOO" || $0 == "BAR" || $0 == "FOOBAR"  {
        return true
    }else{
        return false
    }
}).count

Swift 4

let array = ["FOO", "FOO", "BAR", "FOOBAR"]

// Merging keys with closure for conflicts
let mergedKeysAndValues = Dictionary(zip(array, repeatElement(1, count: array)), uniquingKeysWith: +) 

// mergedKeysAndValues is ["FOO": 2, "BAR": 1, "FOOBAR": 1]

First Step in Counting Sort.

var inputList = [9,8,5,6,4,2,2,1,1]
var countList : [Int] = []

var max = inputList.maxElement()!

// Iniate an array with specific Size and with intial value.
// We made the Size to max+1 to integrate the Zero. We intiated the array with Zeros because it's Counting.

var countArray = [Int](count: Int(max + 1), repeatedValue: 0)

for num in inputList{
    countArray[num] += 1
}

print(countArray)

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