I have a code that I need to run exactly n times in Swift. What is the shortest possible syntax for that?

I am currently using the for loop but it is a lot of typing.

for i in 0..<n { /* do something */ }

Is there a shorter/nicer way for running same code n times in Swift?

  • 11
    I would say that is already pretty damn short. How much shorter do you want to go? – BadmintonCat May 31 '15 at 5:02
  • @hexagonstar a want to push Swift to its theoretical limit if it's not reached already here. – Evgenii May 31 '15 at 5:06
  • 1
    You want to run it infinite times, well try using a while – Ali Gajani May 31 '15 at 5:07
  • 2
    for i in 0 ..< n is already the absolute minimum. You could use a while loop, incrementing a counter but that wouldn't be shorter. – BadmintonCat May 31 '15 at 5:08
  • Note this spectacular solution to a similar problem – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 14:49

12 Answers 12

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Sticking with a for loop - you could extend Int to conform to SequenceType to be able to write:

for i in 5 { /* Repeated five times */ }

To make Int conform to SequenceType you'll could do the following:

extension Int : SequenceType {
    public func generate() -> RangeGenerator<Int> {
        return (0..<self).generate()
    }
}
  • 4
    It is sick! A small point, for me "i in 5" would mean i in 12345 rather than i in 01234. (I'd use a psuedo-keyword more like, perhaps, "upTo" for 01234.) Of course, opinions would differ on this, but bear it in mind. – Fattie Sep 17 '15 at 15:23
up vote 59 down vote
+100

Speaking of syntax, you might define your own shortest syntax:

extension Int {
    func times(_ f: () -> ()) {
        if self > 0 {
            for _ in 0..<self {
                f()
            }
        }
    }

    func times(@autoclosure f: () -> ()) {
        if self > 0 {
            for _ in 0..<self {
                f()
            }
        }
    }
}

var s = "a"
3.times {
    s.append(Character("b"))
}
s // "abbb"


var d = 3.0
5.times(d += 1.0)
d // 8.0
  • 3
    Cool, thanks, reminds me of 5.times { } in Rails. Swift is awesome. – Evgenii May 31 '15 at 23:37
  • repeat is a keyword in Swift 2, so you have to choose a different name. – Adding @escape and perhaps throws/rethrows might also make sense. – Martin R Sep 17 '15 at 14:21
  • As well as this spectacular answer, be sure to check out another spectacular solution to a similar problem. – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 14:48
  • Why are there two versions of the func, one with and one without @autoclosure? – Fattie Sep 18 '15 at 21:03
  • @JoeBlow check out stackoverflow.com/questions/24102617/… – Mr Rogers May 5 '16 at 21:31

You have several ways of doing that:

Using for loops:

for i in 1...n { `/*code*/` }

for i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ { `/*code*/` }

for i in n { `/*code*/` }

using while loops:

var i = 0
while (i < n) {
    `/*code*/`
   ` i++`
}

var i = 0
repeat {
   ` /*code*/`
    `i++`
} while(i <= n)
  • 2
    for i in n doesn't work OOTB – Ferran Maylinch Mar 15 '16 at 21:58
  • for i in n to work you must use @ABakerSmith's answer: stackoverflow.com/a/30560726/2500457 – iphondroid Nov 3 '16 at 9:47
  • for i in 1...n crashes for n = 0. So if this a valid input, make sure to use one of the other methods. – florieger Feb 2 at 13:42
  • the ++ operator was removed from Swift – nielsbot Mar 16 at 18:46
for _ in 1...5 {
  //action will be taken 5 times.
}

Shorter and (I think) clearer:

for i in 1...n { } // note: this will fail if n < 1

or

for i in n { }
  • for i in 1...n crashes for n = 0. So if this a valid input, make sure to use one of the other methods. – florieger Feb 2 at 13:43
  • 1
    Well observed - comment added. – jglasse Feb 2 at 17:24

You could do something like this:

10⨉{ print("loop") }

Using a custom operator and an extension on Int:

infix operator ⨉ // multiplication sign, not lowercase 'x'

extension Int {
    static func ⨉( count:Int, block: () ->Void  ) {
        (0..<count).forEach { _ in block() }
    }
}

you could use functional programming on a range instead of a loop, for shorter and "nicer" syntax for example

(0..<n).forEach{print("Index: \($0)")}

In Swift, what you have is the shortest syntax for performing a loop operation.

Swift provides two kinds of loop that perform a set of statements a certain number of times:

The for-in loop performs a set of statements for each item in a sequence.

The for loop performs a set of statements until a specific condition is met.

If you want to run it infinite times, well try using a while.

ABakerSmith's answer updated for Swift 4:

extension Int: Sequence {
    public func makeIterator() -> CountableRange<Int>.Iterator {
        return (0..<self).makeIterator()
    }
}

Use:

for i in 5 {
    //Performed 5 times
}

The only loop shorter than that is an infinite while loop:

while (true) {
}

But you would still have to increase a counter and check it in the loop to break the loop, and in the end it wouldn't be shorter.

  • 1
    You even could shave a few more characters off by doing for ;; { } :) – ABakerSmith May 31 '15 at 15:22

for-loops are a common way to repeat code. Here is an example of using a for-loop to hide six outlets, versus writing the same code for six outlets. Plus if you make another outlet all you have to do is add it to the array.

let array = [outLet0, outlet1, outlet2, outLet3, outLet4, outLet5]

for outlet in array {
  outlet.hidden = true
}

Versus writing it like this:

outlet0.hidden = true
outlet1.hidden = true
outlet2.hidden = true
outlet3.hidden = true
outlet4.hidden = true
outlet5.hidden = true

There are a lot of answers here, highlighting just how creative you can be, with Swift.

I needed an array so I did this

extension Int {
    func of<T>(iteration: (Int) -> T) -> [T] {
        var collection = [T]()
        for i in 0..<self {
            collection.append(iteration(i))
        }
        return collection
    }
}

fun strings() -> [String] {
    return 4.of { "\($0) teletubby" }
}

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