80

There is a grid of size N x M. Some cells are islands denoted by '0' and the others are water. Each water cell has a number on it denoting the cost of a bridge made on that cell. You have to find the minimum cost for which all the islands can be connected. A cell is connected to another cell if it shares an edge or a vertex.

What algorithm can be used to solve this problem ?
Edit: What can be used as a brute force approach if the values of N, M are very small, say NxM <= 100?

Example: In the given image, green cells indicate islands, blue cells indicate water and light blue cells indicate the cells on which a bridge should be made. Thus for the following image, the answer will be 17.

http://i.imgur.com/ClcboBy.png

Initially I thought of marking all the islands as nodes and connecting every pair of islands by a shortest bridge. Then the problem could be reduced to Minimum spanning tree, but in this approach I missed the case where edges are overlapping. For example, in the following image, the shortest distance between any two islands is 7(marked in yellow), so by using Minimum Spanning Trees the answer would be 14, but the answer should be 11 (marked in light blue).

image2

  • The solution approach you've described in your questions seems to be correct. Could you elaborate on what you mean by "I missed the case where edges are overlapping"? – Asad Saeeduddin May 31 '15 at 9:04
  • @Asad : I have added an image to explain the problem in the MST approach. – Atul Vaibhav May 31 '15 at 9:25
  • "connect every two islands by a shortest bridge" - as you can see, that's clearly a bad approach. – Karoly Horvath May 31 '15 at 9:37
  • 1
    Could you please share the code you're currently using? This would make coming up with an answer a bit easier and would also show us exactly what your current approach is. – Asad Saeeduddin May 31 '15 at 9:38
  • 6
    This is a variant of Steiner tree problem. Follow the link to Wikipedia for some insights. In short, the exact solution perhaps cannot be found in polynomial time, but a minimal spanning tree is a not-so-bad approximation. – Gassa May 31 '15 at 9:54
64
+200

To approach this problem, I would use an integer programming framework and define three sets of decision variables:

  • x_ij: A binary indicator variable for whether we build a bridge at water location (i, j).
  • y_ijbcn: A binary indicator for whether water location (i, j) is the n^th location linking island b to island c.
  • l_bc: A binary indicator variable for whether islands b and c are directly linked (aka you can walk only on bridge squares from b to c).

For bridge building costs c_ij, the objective value to minimize is sum_ij c_ij * x_ij. We need to add the following constraints to the model:

  • We need to ensure the y_ijbcn variables are valid. We can always only reach a water square if we build a bridge there, so y_ijbcn <= x_ij for every water location (i, j). Further, y_ijbc1 must equal 0 if (i, j) does not border island b. Finally, for n > 1, y_ijbcn can only be used if a neighboring water location was used in step n-1. Defining N(i, j) to be the water squares neighboring (i, j), this is equivalent to y_ijbcn <= sum_{(l, m) in N(i, j)} y_lmbc(n-1).
  • We need to ensure the l_bc variables are only set if b and c are linked. If we define I(c) to be the locations bordering island c, this can be accomplished with l_bc <= sum_{(i, j) in I(c), n} y_ijbcn.
  • We need to ensure that all islands are linked, either directly or indirectly. This can be accomplished in the following way: for every non-empty proper subset S of islands, require that at least one island in S is linked to at least one island in the complement of S, which we'll call S'. In constraints, we can implement this by adding a constraint for every non-empty set S of size <= K/2 (where K is the number of islands), sum_{b in S} sum_{c in S'} l_bc >= 1.

For a problem instance with K islands, W water squares, and specified maximum path length N, this is a mixed integer programming model with O(K^2WN) variables and O(K^2WN + 2^K) constraints. Obviously this will become intractable as the problem size becomes large, but it may be solvable for the sizes you care about. To get a sense of the scalability, I'll implement it in python using the pulp package. Let's first start with the smaller 7 x 9 map with 3 islands at the bottom of the question:

import itertools
import pulp
water = {(0, 2): 2.0, (0, 3): 1.0, (0, 4): 1.0, (0, 5): 1.0, (0, 6): 2.0,
         (1, 0): 2.0, (1, 1): 9.0, (1, 2): 1.0, (1, 3): 9.0, (1, 4): 9.0,
         (1, 5): 9.0, (1, 6): 1.0, (1, 7): 9.0, (1, 8): 2.0,
         (2, 0): 1.0, (2, 1): 9.0, (2, 2): 9.0, (2, 3): 1.0, (2, 4): 9.0,
         (2, 5): 1.0, (2, 6): 9.0, (2, 7): 9.0, (2, 8): 1.0,
         (3, 0): 9.0, (3, 1): 1.0, (3, 2): 9.0, (3, 3): 9.0, (3, 4): 5.0,
         (3, 5): 9.0, (3, 6): 9.0, (3, 7): 1.0, (3, 8): 9.0,
         (4, 0): 9.0, (4, 1): 9.0, (4, 2): 1.0, (4, 3): 9.0, (4, 4): 1.0,
         (4, 5): 9.0, (4, 6): 1.0, (4, 7): 9.0, (4, 8): 9.0,
         (5, 0): 9.0, (5, 1): 9.0, (5, 2): 9.0, (5, 3): 2.0, (5, 4): 1.0,
         (5, 5): 2.0, (5, 6): 9.0, (5, 7): 9.0, (5, 8): 9.0,
         (6, 0): 9.0, (6, 1): 9.0, (6, 2): 9.0, (6, 6): 9.0, (6, 7): 9.0,
         (6, 8): 9.0}
islands = {0: [(0, 0), (0, 1)], 1: [(0, 7), (0, 8)], 2: [(6, 3), (6, 4), (6, 5)]}
N = 6

# Island borders
iborders = {}
for k in islands:
    iborders[k] = {}
    for i, j in islands[k]:
        for dx in [-1, 0, 1]:
            for dy in [-1, 0, 1]:
                if (i+dx, j+dy) in water:
                    iborders[k][(i+dx, j+dy)] = True

# Create models with specified variables
x = pulp.LpVariable.dicts("x", water.keys(), lowBound=0, upBound=1, cat=pulp.LpInteger)
pairs = [(b, c) for b in islands for c in islands if b < c]
yvals = []
for i, j in water:
    for b, c in pairs:
        for n in range(N):
            yvals.append((i, j, b, c, n))

y = pulp.LpVariable.dicts("y", yvals, lowBound=0, upBound=1)
l = pulp.LpVariable.dicts("l", pairs, lowBound=0, upBound=1)
mod = pulp.LpProblem("Islands", pulp.LpMinimize)

# Objective
mod += sum([water[k] * x[k] for k in water])

# Valid y
for k in yvals:
    i, j, b, c, n = k
    mod += y[k] <= x[(i, j)]
    if n == 0 and not (i, j) in iborders[b]:
        mod += y[k] == 0
    elif n > 0:
        mod += y[k] <= sum([y[(i+dx, j+dy, b, c, n-1)] for dx in [-1, 0, 1] for dy in [-1, 0, 1] if (i+dx, j+dy) in water])

# Valid l
for b, c in pairs:
    mod += l[(b, c)] <= sum([y[(i, j, B, C, n)] for i, j, B, C, n in yvals if (i, j) in iborders[c] and B==b and C==c])

# All islands connected (directly or indirectly)
ikeys = islands.keys()
for size in range(1, len(ikeys)/2+1):
    for S in itertools.combinations(ikeys, size):
        thisSubset = {m: True for m in S}
        Sprime = [m for m in ikeys if not m in thisSubset]
        mod += sum([l[(min(b, c), max(b, c))] for b in S for c in Sprime]) >= 1

# Solve and output
mod.solve()
for row in range(min([m[0] for m in water]), max([m[0] for m in water])+1):
    for col in range(min([m[1] for m in water]), max([m[1] for m in water])+1):
        if (row, col) in water:
            if x[(row, col)].value() > 0.999:
                print "B",
            else:
                print "-",
        else:
            print "I",
    print ""

This takes 1.4 seconds to run using the default solver from the pulp package (the CBC solver) and outputs the correct solution:

I I - - - - - I I 
- - B - - - B - - 
- - - B - B - - - 
- - - - B - - - - 
- - - - B - - - - 
- - - - B - - - - 
- - - I I I - - - 

Next, consider the full problem at the top of the question, which is a 13 x 14 grid with 7 islands:

water = {(i, j): 1.0 for i in range(13) for j in range(14)}
islands = {0: [(0, 0), (0, 1), (1, 0), (1, 1), (2, 0), (2, 1)],
           1: [(9, 0), (9, 1), (10, 0), (10, 1), (10, 2), (11, 0), (11, 1),
               (11, 2), (12, 0)],
           2: [(0, 7), (0, 8), (1, 7), (1, 8), (2, 7)],
           3: [(7, 7), (8, 6), (8, 7), (8, 8), (9, 7)],
           4: [(0, 11), (0, 12), (0, 13), (1, 12)],
           5: [(4, 10), (4, 11), (5, 10), (5, 11)],
           6: [(11, 8), (11, 9), (11, 13), (12, 8), (12, 9), (12, 10), (12, 11),
               (12, 12), (12, 13)]}
for k in islands:
    for i, j in islands[k]:
        del water[(i, j)]

for i, j in [(10, 7), (10, 8), (10, 9), (10, 10), (10, 11), (10, 12),
             (11, 7), (12, 7)]:
    water[(i, j)] = 20.0

N = 7

MIP solvers often obtain good solutions relatively quickly and then spend a huge about of time trying to prove the optimality of the solution. Using the same solver code as above, the program does not complete within 30 minutes. However, you can provide a timeout to the solver to get an approximate solution:

mod.solve(pulp.solvers.PULP_CBC_CMD(maxSeconds=120))

This yields a solution with objective value 17:

I I - - - - - I I - - I I I 
I I - - - - - I I - - - I - 
I I - - - - - I - B - B - - 
- - B - - - B - - - B - - - 
- - - B - B - - - - I I - - 
- - - - B - - - - - I I - - 
- - - - - B - - - - - B - - 
- - - - - B - I - - - - B - 
- - - - B - I I I - - B - - 
I I - B - - - I - - - - B - 
I I I - - - - - - - - - - B 
I I I - - - - - I I - - - I 
I - - - - - - - I I I I I I 

To improve the quality of the solutions you obtain, you could use a commercial MIP solver (this is free if you are at an academic institution and likely not free otherwise). For instance, here's the performance of Gurobi 6.0.4, again with a 2-minute time limit (though from the solution log we read that the solver found the current best solution within 7 seconds):

mod.solve(pulp.solvers.GUROBI(timeLimit=120))

This actually finds a solution of objective value 16, one better than the OP was able to find by hand!

I I - - - - - I I - - I I I 
I I - - - - - I I - - - I - 
I I - - - - - I - B - B - - 
- - B - - - - - - - B - - - 
- - - B - - - - - - I I - - 
- - - - B - - - - - I I - - 
- - - - - B - - B B - - - - 
- - - - - B - I - - B - - - 
- - - - B - I I I - - B - - 
I I - B - - - I - - - - B - 
I I I - - - - - - - - - - B 
I I I - - - - - I I - - - I 
I - - - - - - - I I I I I I 
  • Instead of the y_ijbcn formulation, I'd try a formulation based on flow (variable for each tuple consisting of an island pair and square adjacency; conservation constraints, with excess 1 at the sink and -1 at the source; bound total in-flow at a square by whether it was purchased). – David Eisenstat Jun 25 '15 at 1:14
  • 1
    @DavidEisenstat thanks for the suggestion -- I just tried it out and unfortunately it solved a good deal more slowly for these problem instances. – josliber Jun 25 '15 at 2:48
  • 6
    This is exactly what I was looking for when I started the bounty. It amazes me how such a trivial-to-describe problem can give such a hard time to MIP solvers. I was wondering if the following is true: A path linking two islands is a shortest path with the additional constraint that it has to pass through some cell (i, j). For example, the top left and middle islands in Gurobi's solution are linked with a SP that is constrained to pass through cell (6, 5). Not sure if this is true, but ill look into it at some point. Thanks for the answer! – Ioannis Jul 5 '15 at 18:51
  • @Ioannis interesting question -- I'm not sure if your conjecture is true but it seems quite plausible to me. You could think of the cell (i, j) as where the bridges from these islands need to go to further connect to other islands, and then subject to reaching that coordinating point you would just want to build the cheapest bridges possible to connect the island pair. – josliber Jul 5 '15 at 20:39
4

A brute-force approach, in pseudo-code:

start with a horrible "best" answer
given an nxm map,
    try all 2^(n*m) combinations of bridge/no-bridge for each cell
        if the result is connected, and better than previous best, store it

return best

In C++, this could be written as

// map = linearized map; map[x*n + y] is the equivalent of map2d[y][x]
// nm = n*m
// bridged = true if bridge there, false if not. Also linearized
// nBridged = depth of recursion (= current bridge being considered)
// cost = total cost of bridges in 'bridged'
// best, bestCost = best answer so far. Initialized to "horrible"
void findBestBridges(char map[], int nm,
   bool bridged[], int nBridged, int cost, bool best[], int &bestCost) {
   if (nBridged == nm) {
      if (connected(map, nm, bridged) && cost < bestCost) {
          memcpy(best, bridged, nBridged);
          bestCost = best;
      }
      return;
   }
   if (map[nBridged] != 0) {
      // try with a bridge there
      bridged[nBridged] = true;
      cost += map[nBridged];

      // see how it turns out
      findBestBridges(map, nm, bridged, nBridged+1, cost, best, bestCost);         

      // remove bridge for further recursion
      bridged[nBridged] = false;
      cost -= map[nBridged];
   }
   // and try without a bridge there
   findBestBridges(map, nm, bridged, nBridged+1, cost, best, bestCost);
}

After making a first call (I am assuming you are transforming your 2d maps to 1d arrays for ease of copying around), bestCost will contain the cost of the best answer, and best will contain the pattern of bridges that yields it. This is, however extremely slow.

Optimizations:

  • By using a "bridge limit", and running the algorithm for increasing maximum numbers of bridges, you can find minimal answers without exploring the whole tree. Finding a 1-bridge answer, if it existed, would be O(nm) instead of O(2^nm) - a drastic improvement.
  • You can avoid searching (by stopping recursion; this is also called "pruning") once you have exceeded bestCost, because it makes no sense to keep looking afterwards. If it can't get better, don't keep digging.
  • The above pruning works better if you look at "good" candidates before looking at "bad" ones (as it is, cells are all looked at in left-to-right, top-to-bottom order). A good heuristic would be to consider cells that are near to several unconnected components as higher-priority than cells that are not. However, once you add heuristics, your search starts to resemble A* (and you need some kind of priority queue, too).
  • Duplicate bridges and bridges to nowhere are to be avoided. Any bridge that does not disconnect the island network if removed is redundant.

A general search algorithm such as A* allows much faster search, although finding better heuristics is not a simple task. For a more problem-specific approach, using existing results on Steiner trees, as suggested by @Gassa, is the way to go. Note, however, that the problem of building Steiner trees on orthogonal grids is NP-Complete, according to this paper by Garey and Johnson.

If "good enough" is enough, a genetic algorithm can probably find acceptable solutions quickly, as long as you add a few key heuristics as to preferred bridge placement.

  • "try all 2^(n*m) combinations" uh, 2^(13*14) ~ 6.1299822e+54 iterations. If we assume you can do a million iterations per second, that would only take... ~194380460000000000000000000000000000000000` years. Those optimizations are very necessary. – Mooing Duck Jun 9 '15 at 17:40
  • OP did ask for "a brute force approach if values of N,M are very small, say NxM <= 100". Assuming, say, 20 bridges are enough, and the only optimization you use is the bridge-limiting one above, the optimal solution will be found in O(2^20), which is well in range of your hypothetical computer. – tucuxi Jun 16 '15 at 17:05
  • Most backtracking algorithms are horribly inefficient until you add pruning, iterative deepening, and so on. This is not to say that they are useless. For example, chess engines routinely beat grandmasters with these algorithms (granted - they use every trick in the book to prune aggressively) – tucuxi Jun 16 '15 at 17:15
3

This problem is a variant of Steiner tree called node-weighted Steiner tree, specialized a certain class of graphs. Compactly, node-weighted Steiner tree is, given a node-weighted undirected graph where some nodes are terminals, find the cheapest set of nodes including all terminals that induces a connected subgraph. Sadly, I can't seem to find any solvers in some cursory searches.

To formulate as an integer program, make a 0-1 variable for each non-terminal node, then for all subsets of non-terminal nodes whose removal from the starting graph disconnects two terminals, require that the sum of variables in the subset be at least 1. This induces way too many constraints, so you'll have to enforce them lazily, using an efficient algorithm for node connectivity (max flow, basically) to detect a maximally violated constraint. Sorry for the lack of details, but this is going to be a pain to implement even if you are already familiar with integer programming.

-1

Given that this problem takes place in a grid, and you have well defined parameters, I would approach the problem with systematic elimination of the problem space via creating a minimum spanning tree. In doing so, it makes sense to me if you approach this problem with Prim's Algorithm.

Unfortunately, you now run into the problem of abstracting away the grid to create a set of nodes and edges... ergo the real problem of this post is how do I convert my n x m grid into {V} and {E}?

This conversion process is, at a glance, likely NP-Hard because of the sheer number of combinations possible (assume that all waterway costs are identical). To handle instances where paths overlap, you should consider making a virtual island.

When this is done, run Prim's Algorithm and you should arrive at the optimal solution.

I do not believe that Dynamic Programming can be run effectively here because there is no observable principle of optimality. If we find the minimum cost between two islands, that doesn't necessarily mean that we can find the minimum cost between those two and the third island, or another subset of islands which will be (by my definition to find the MST via Prim) connected.

If you would like code (pseudo or otherwise) to convert your grid into a set of {V} and {E}, please send me a private message and I will look into splicing together an implementation.

  • All water-costs are not identical (see examples). Since Prim has no notion of creating those "virtual nodes", you should consider an algorithm that does: Steiner trees (where your virtual nodes are called "Steiner points"). – tucuxi Jun 17 '15 at 9:42
  • @tucuxi : Mentioning that all waterway costs could be identical is necessary for analysis of the worst case because this is the condition that inflates the search space to its maximum potential. This is why I brought it up. In regards to Prim, I assume that the programmer in charge of implementing Prim for this problem recognizes that Prim does not create virtual nodes and handles this at the implementation level. I have not yet seen Steiner trees yet (still undergrad) so thank you for the new material to learn! – karnesJ.R Jun 17 '15 at 20:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.