121

All of the tutorials I see online show how to create classes with __init__ constructor methods so one can declare objects of that type, or instances of that class.

How do I create a class (static in Java) so that I can access all methods and attributes of that class without having to create new instances/objects?

For example:

class World:

    allElems = []

    def addElem(x):  

        allElems.append(x)

World.addElem(6)
print(World.allElems)

EDIT

class World(object):

    allAirports = []

    @staticmethod
    def initialize():

        f = open(os.path.expanduser("~/Desktop/1000airports.csv"))
        file_reader = csv.reader(f)

        for col in file_reader:

            allAirports.append(Airport(col[0],col[2],col[3]))

error: name 'allAirports' is not defined

9
  • 6
    Why do you want a static class? What do you want to achieve? - see also: stackoverflow.com/q/10388127/562769 Commented May 31, 2015 at 11:32
  • 12
    Don't do this. I don't know what Java has done to your poor soul, but this can only end badly. allAirports is not only a transgression of PEP 8, but - *gasp!* - a mutable global. Whatever you're trying to achieve, you're trying to acheive the wrong way.
    – Veedrac
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 8:53
  • 3
    Also, use with for files.
    – Veedrac
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 8:53
  • 4
    There are valid use cases for regular classes, for static classes and for bare functions.
    – Jeyekomon
    Commented Apr 24, 2019 at 11:09
  • 1
    @Jeyekomon I understand that. I think the point of using that terminology was to refer to the analogy with Java. The way you phrased, however, suggested that there is an actual distinction, and I thought the clarification was worth mentioning.
    – user4396006
    Commented Apr 12, 2020 at 18:55

5 Answers 5

152

The Pythonic way to create a static class is simply to declare those methods outside of a class (Java uses classes both for objects and for grouping related functions, but Python modules are sufficient for grouping related functions that do not require any object instance). However, if you insist on making a method at the class level that doesn't require an instance (rather than simply making it a free-standing function in your module), you can do so by using the "@staticmethod" decorator.

That is, the Pythonic way would be:

# My module
elements = []

def add_element(x):
  elements.append(x)

But if you want to mirror the structure of Java, you can do:

# My module
class World(object):
  elements = []

  @staticmethod
  def add_element(x):
    World.elements.append(x)

You can also do this with @classmethod if you care to know the specific class (which can be handy if you want to allow the static method to be inherited by a class inheriting from this class):

# My module
class World(object):
  elements = []

  @classmethod
  def add_element(cls, x):
    cls.elements.append(x)
9
  • See above in edit, I used this approach and receive error. No idea why :/ Commented May 31, 2015 at 11:48
  • 7
    Note that The Pythonic way only works for methods and creates a problem for fields, since if the user imports the field via from module import field they are stuck with the value at the time of importation.
    – c z
    Commented Aug 25, 2017 at 11:57
  • 3
    Good answer, but does PEP8 weight in into this at all?
    – radtek
    Commented Feb 13, 2018 at 18:47
  • 1
    Great insight on the Java vs Python 'class' comparison! Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 17:23
  • 1
    "The Pythonic way to create a static class is simply to declare those methods outside of a class" Really? But how can one make use of inheritance then?
    – Hyperplane
    Commented Jun 30, 2021 at 21:50
24

You could use a classmethod or staticmethod

class Paul(object):
    elems = []

    @classmethod
    def addelem(cls, e):
        cls.elems.append(e)

    @staticmethod
    def addelem2(e):
        Paul.elems.append(e)

Paul.addelem(1)
Paul.addelem2(2)

print(Paul.elems)

classmethod has advantage that it would work with sub classes, if you really wanted that functionality.

module is certainly best though.

20

There are two ways to do that (Python 2.6+):

static method

class Klass(object):
    @staticmethod
    def static_method():
        print "Hello World"

Klass.static_method()

module

your module file, called klass.py

def static_method():
    print "Hello World"

your code:

import klass

klass.static_method()
2
  • That module solution is great. Can you see above in my edit, why I receive the following error: 'allAirports' not defined for static method Commented May 31, 2015 at 11:45
  • 1
    you forgot to put self in line 12. it should be self.allAirports.append(Airport(col[0],col[2],col[3])) Commented May 31, 2015 at 11:48
10

Ancient thread, but one way to make this work is:

class Static:
  def __new__(cls):
    raise TypeError('Static classes cannot be instantiated')

Then, you can use it like so:

class Foo(Static): ...

Seems the most 'Pythonic' to me, anyway.

Example use case: singleton class where I register handlers for conversion between types.

Cheers!

1
  • 1
    I really like your solution. I'm a beginner, but seems easy and very reusable. Thanks
    – DataArtist
    Commented Jan 29, 2022 at 16:38
2

Seems that you need classmethod:

class World(object):

    allAirports = []

    @classmethod
    def initialize(cls):

        if not cls.allAirports:
            f = open(os.path.expanduser("~/Desktop/1000airports.csv"))
            file_reader = csv.reader(f)

            for col in file_reader:
                cls.allAirports.append(Airport(col[0],col[2],col[3]))

        return cls.allAirports

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