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I'm a cyclist and a programmer. During my rides, I'm recording data to xml files using a phone based gps tracker and a power meter. After the ride, I use the power meter software to merge the data and then upload to a web site. On the website, the resulting data is showing highly inaccurate data for WR Watts (It is a weighted average, also known as normalized power, which by definition is higher than average power and lower than my maximum recorded watts. See http://ridewithgps.com/trips/4834566 (Export TCX History to get the file I'm referring to). /<Watts>\d{4,} returns no results.

Calories:   1809
Max Watts:  676
Avg. Watts: 213 (170 with 0s)
WR Power    23487
Work    1681 kJ
Max Speed:  26.2 mph
Avg. Speed: 16.6 mph

Here are two sample readings from the tcx history file.

      <Trackpoint>
        <Time>2015-05-30T11:35:50Z</Time>
        <Position>
          <LatitudeDegrees>41.96306</LatitudeDegrees>
          <LongitudeDegrees>-87.645939</LongitudeDegrees>
        </Position>
        <AltitudeMeters>177.7</AltitudeMeters>
        <DistanceMeters>71.5</DistanceMeters>
        <Cadence>67</Cadence>
        <Extensions>
          <TPX xmlns="http://www.garmin.com/xmlschemas/ActivityExtension/v2">
            <Watts>104</Watts>
          </TPX>
        </Extensions>
      </Trackpoint>
      <Trackpoint>
        <Time>2015-05-30T11:35:51Z</Time>
        <Position>
          <LatitudeDegrees>41.963076</LatitudeDegrees>
          <LongitudeDegrees>-87.646094</LongitudeDegrees>
        </Position>
        <AltitudeMeters>178.0</AltitudeMeters>
        <DistanceMeters>75.7</DistanceMeters>
        <Cadence>67</Cadence>
        <Extensions>
          <TPX xmlns="http://www.garmin.com/xmlschemas/ActivityExtension/v2">
            <Watts>156</Watts>
          </TPX>
        </Extensions>
      </Trackpoint>

I've reviewed every entry for <Watts>\d*</Watts> where the corresponding Cadence was zero (if I'm not pedaling, watts should be zero).

:g/<Cadence>0/.,+3s/<Watts>[1-9]\d*/<Watts>0/c

But that did not resolve the issue. My next step is to find entries where the distance between tracepoints does not change and which contains a wattage greater than zero. This returns E65: Illegal back reference

:g/<DistanceMeters>\(\d*\)/+1,+15s/<DistanceMeters>\1/

CLARIFICATION:

I'm looking for locations where Watts must be zero and are not. These would be where I am not pedaling (Cadence = 0) and also when I am not moving (Consecutive distance nodes that are identical). I've already corrected the Wattage for cadence = 0, but don't know how to find consecutive <DistanceMeters>N</DistanceMeters> nodes where N is unchanged.

  • What is your expected output? – Federico Piazza Jun 1 '15 at 0:20
  • WR Watts should be around 210 to 230 watts. It is usually close to average power but higher. It is a means of calculating a perceived exertion for the ride, how hard you are working. See endurancecorner.com/wko_definitions for the calculation of NP (or WR Watts). – B2K Jun 1 '15 at 0:31
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    Not sure what you are doing. Please describe your problem as a programmer (on strings, with defined input and output), not as a cyclist (I have no idea what cadence is, or why it matters). You have two data formats in your question, it is not clear to me which one is your input, nor what the other one is. How are you creating your webpage? Are you editing it manually? Why not script it? Where does gvim come in in your workflow? (You can see, I am pretty confused.) Finally, I have no idea what you want to achieve with your :g; the error is logical as captures don't persist between two regexps – Amadan Jun 1 '15 at 1:45
  • ...and that is exactly what you have: two regexps (:g/first/+1,+15/second/). And that expression does not change the document or the buffer at all, from what I can see. – Amadan Jun 1 '15 at 1:47
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    Thanks; yes, sorry, that's what I meant, more clarification (not necessarily less domain). This would be very tricky in gvim. But quite easy in another programming language, that has support for XML. For example, in this JSBin, just paste your XML in the left pane, adjust the name of the root element in the central pane, and read off the weird trackpoints in the right one. – Amadan Jun 1 '15 at 5:27
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Given enough determination, it can be done:

:%s/\m<DistanceMeters>\([0-9.]\+\)<\/DistanceMeters>\n\(.*\n\)\{1,15}\s\+<DistanceMeters>\1<\/DistanceMeters>\n\(.*\n\)\{3}\s\+<Watts>\zs[1-9]\d*\ze<\/Watts>/0/gc

However, why on Earth would you want to do that in Vim?

  • That's amazing. The reason is that I want to correct the anomalies so that I can re-upload the file and have accurate statistics. On a 40+ mile bike ride, it's like finding a needle in a haystack. Short of writing a program to do this, I can't think of an editor better suited to the task. – B2K Jun 1 '15 at 12:29

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