5

Most of the time I use struct to hold all parameters for my socket communication data structure and then I can easily copy, pass or put the entire structure on the socket by just passing the start address and its size.

If I add a constructor to the struct for a variable short array, will the constructor occupy any space within the struct? Or can I treat the struct with a constructor the same as a struct without a constructor, and copy the entire struct on to the socket with its start address and its size, and its space is still continuously allocated?

  • Note that copying an entire struct across the network this way is fragile and will break if the programs communicating with each other do not have the exact same padding, endian-ness, and value-sizes. (something to watch out for if you want to communicate across architectures, or even within the same architecture but between instances of your program that were compiled with different compiler settings or different compiler versions) – Jeremy Friesner Jun 1 '15 at 7:39
7

No, non-virtual member functions do not contribute to the sizeof of your object. The existence of at least one virtual function contribute (however constructors cannot be virtual) since the compiler is usually implementing them via a pointer (vpointer) to an array of pointer to functions (vtable), so it must store that pointer (4 or 8 bytes usually).

| improve this answer | |
  • It would be more accurate to say that having one or more virtual functions contributes. The function itself doesn't. – Marquis of Lorne Jun 1 '15 at 2:22
  • And in case of multiple inheritance you can have even more. – Philip Stuyck Jun 1 '15 at 16:37
  • @PhilipStuyck yes of course, I was considering the simplest case where there's no inheritance. – vsoftco Jun 1 '15 at 16:38
0

This question is related with C++ object model. Normal function does not increase data size. However, if we add virtual functions, the compiler will generate __vptr to point to virtual function table which will increase the data size of struct.

For example, I have a.C

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
struct X
{
    X(){}
    int i;
    int j;

};

int main()
{
    X x;
    cout << sizeof(x) << endl;
}

Here, I use my IBM XL C++ Compiler in my machine to compile and run it:

xlC -+ a.C
./a.out

The output will be 8, which is the same as the struct only has int i and int j.

But if I add two virtual functions:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
struct X
{
    X(){}
    int i;
    int j;
    virtual void foo(){}
    virtual void bar(){}
};

int main()
{
    X x;
    cout << sizeof(x) << endl;
}

If recompile and run it:

xlC -+ a.c
./a.out

The output will be 16. 8 for two int, 8 for __vptr (my machine is 64 bits).

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.