55

I wrote this little program:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread t = new Thread(WriteX);
        t.Start();

        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            Console.Write("O");
        }
    }

    private static void WriteX()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            Console.Write(".");
        }
    }
}

I ran it about fifty times, and the first character on the console was always "O". It is weird for me, because the t thread starts first then the main continues.

Is there any explanation for this?

17
  • 51
    (un)luck. There is no guarantee that the O will be first, but overhead when creating the secondary thread will make it very unlikely that the second thread will end up racing to the finish line first. You can compare this with standing 20cm from the finish line, then yelling "Gentlemen, start your engines and go!" and then immediately take a step over the finish line. The chance is present, but negligible. Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 7:26
  • 1
    The behavior isn't deterministic and depends on the OS thread scheduler. Don't forget that creating the thread itself has overhead. Try running it enough times and you'll see it in different variations. Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 7:27
  • 1
    It could relate to the time it takes the thread to start up (in that time the mainthread continues its own work...aka it starts the for loop). Did you try what happens when you put a short sleep after t.Start() in the main (about 30 milliseconds for example)?
    – Thomas
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 7:27
  • 1
    @Uriil Yet, (s)he might never came to that result. i.e. On Intel atom-based architectures creating a background thread is a tiny bit more expensive then on the i5/i7 architecture, so you will see a quite different statistical result. (Don't ask! Just be happy because you should not know why. :D )
    – mg30rg
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 8:10
  • 1
    And in addition threads may behave differently on debug and release mode like for this fellow, though it's a different case it worths knowing
    – MVCDS
    Commented Jun 2, 2015 at 20:50

7 Answers 7

53

This is probably because Thread.Start first causes the change of state of thread on which it is called and OS schedules it for execution whereas the main thread is already running and does not need these two steps. This is probably the reason that the statement in main thread executes first rather the one in the newly created thread. Keep in mind the sequence of thread execution is not guaranteed.

Thread.Start Method

1) Thread.Start Method Causes the operating system to change the state of the current instance to ThreadState.Running.

2) Once a thread is in the ThreadState.Running state, the operating system can schedule it for execution. The thread begins executing at the first line of the method represented by the ThreadStart

Edit It seems to me that representing this in graphical form will make this more clear and understandable. I tried to show the sequence of thread execution in diagram below.

enter image description here

20

You say:

"It is weird for me, because the t thread starts first then the main continues.".

This is not true. The "main" tread is already running. When t.Start(); is executed, the OS is told t is in the running state. The OS will then schedule execution time for the thread "soon". This is something else than the OS is instructed to stop execution of this thread until thread t is started. In other words, when Start returns, there is no guarantee that the thread has already started executing.

1
  • 1
    Short and on the spot. The thread is allowed to be started, and Start doesn't wait for it to actually start executing.
    – Luaan
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 12:21
13

More of an advice than not an answer:

(Please note, that I see no real-life use for what you are trying to achieve, so I treat your problem as a thought experiment/proof of a concept not explained in detail.)


If you want your threads to "race" for control, don't give your main thread a head start! Creating a thread has some overhead and your main thread is already created (since it creates your other thread). If you are looking for a mostly equal chance for both of your main and worker thread, you should wait for your worker thread to be created in the main thread and wait for the main thread to start the race in your background thread. This can be achived by synch objects.


In practice it would look like this:

You should declare two ManualResetEvents which are visible for both your main- and background thread like this:

private static ManualResetEvent backgroundThreadReady = new ManualResetEvent(false);
private static ManualResetEvent startThreadRace = new ManualResetEvent(false);

Then in your main thread, you should wait for your thread being initialized like:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Thread t = new Thread(WriteX);
    t.Start();
    backgroundThreadReady.WaitOne(); // wait for background thread to be ready

    startThreadRace.Set();           // signal your background thread to start the race
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        Console.Write("O");
    }
}

And in your thread:

    private static void WriteX()
    {
        backgroundThreadReady.Set(); // inform your main thread that this thread is ready for the race

        startThreadRace.WaitOne();   // wait 'till the main thread starts the race
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            Console.Write(".");
        }
    }

Please note that I could have used other waitable sync objects (mutex, autoreset event, even a critical section lock with some hack, I've just choose the simplest, fastest solution which can be extended easily).

5

Your code is non deterministic. Your code contains no thread primitives that would schedule priority of one thread over another or for one thread to wait for another.

3
  • 6
    That does not answer the question.
    – edc65
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 10:40
  • 2
    The asker already thought this was the case, thus the question. Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 11:00
  • 1
    @Dukeling The asker expected a nondeterministic result and is confused because (her/)his result is seemingly deterministic, so I guess edc65 is right.
    – mg30rg
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 14:39
4

Main process continue its next instructions set after invoking the thread ,It will take time to start thread method as light process.

4

It basically needs time to start the thread up. You are running the thread code at the same time as the rest of the first method. So taking into account the time it takes to start the thread and then get to the point where it is writing the "." does that make sense?

If you have a sort of reset button in your app to start everything again (without exiting) you may find that the first character is the "." because the thread will already exist.

2
  • 1
    I'm not sure if your thread caching statement is accurate. My understanding was manually created threads don't pilfer or add to the thread pool. To use a thread pool thread you need to either use TPL and the current scheduler, or the older ThreadPool stuff. Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 7:32
  • Thanks for that, I have updated it now (hopefully to something correct). To be fair I have just started to experiment with Multithreading and TPL and I just observed that behaviour and assumed it was caching it. I guess it makes sense that it is already there so it doesn't need the overhead of starting it again.
    – Keithin8a
    Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 7:38
-1

There is only one reason why the main thread will finish before the created thread and that is because it takes time to start a thread. The only time you would use threads to speed up a program is when 2 tasks can be run at the exact same time. If you want to make the second loop finish first , take a look at Parallel.For loops in c#... these will run each loop in the for loop at the same time (not all of them but as much as your PC can handle)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.