54

I have a problem with configuration on Logback in a Spring Boot application. I want my consoleAppender to look like the default Spring Boot console appender. How to inherit pattern from Spring Boot default console appender?

Below is my consoleAppender configuration

<appender name="consoleAppender" class="ch.qos.logback.core.ConsoleAppender">
    <layout class="ch.qos.logback.classic.PatternLayout">
        <Pattern class="org.">
            %d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss} [%thread] %-5level %logger{36} - %msg%n
        </Pattern>
    </layout>
</appender>
1
91

Once you have included the default configuration, you can use its values in your own logback-spring.xml configuration:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration scan="true">
    <!-- use Spring default values -->
    <include resource="org/springframework/boot/logging/logback/defaults.xml"/>

    <appender name="CONSOLE" class="ch.qos.logback.core.ConsoleAppender">
        <encoder>
            <pattern>${CONSOLE_LOG_PATTERN}</pattern>
            <charset>utf8</charset>
        </encoder>
    </appender>
    …
</configuration>
7
  • The easiest way to do that!, nice – JorgeTovar Jun 11 '19 at 17:28
  • 5
    Don't forget adding <root level="INFO"><appender-ref ref="CONSOLE"/></root>, otherwise you won't get anything logged – jediz Oct 1 '19 at 19:36
  • 1
    as jediz said above, this solution logs nothing unless you add <root level="INFO"><appender-ref ref="CONSOLE"/></root> – fethe Oct 10 '19 at 16:58
  • 1
    Probably you also want to add packagingData="true" in <configuration> for package names in exception log messages as it is the default with Spring Boot logging. – Niklas Peter Jan 23 at 12:02
  • 2
    If the desire is to use the Spring default values, then instead of utf8 the default value CONSOLE_LOG_CHARSET can be used as well – Camellia Nacheva Feb 25 at 15:32
36

You can find Spring Boot logback console logging pattern in defaults.xml file:

spring-boot-1.5.0.RELEASE.jar/org/springframework/boot/logging/logback/defaults.xml

Console pattern:

<property name="CONSOLE_LOG_PATTERN" value="${CONSOLE_LOG_PATTERN:-%clr(%d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS}){faint} %clr(${LOG_LEVEL_PATTERN:-%5p}) %clr(${PID:- }){magenta} %clr(---){faint} %clr([%15.15t]){faint} %clr(%-40.40logger{39}){cyan} %clr(:){faint} %m%n${LOG_EXCEPTION_CONVERSION_WORD:-%wEx}}"/>
2
  • 1
    what does LOG_EXCEPTION_CONVERSION_WORD do? – Kalpesh Soni Oct 9 '18 at 17:06
  • This pattern goes through some variable substitution resulting in a different pattern – cdalxndr Feb 22 '20 at 14:20
10
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>

    <conversionRule conversionWord="clr" converterClass="org.springframework.boot.logging.logback.ColorConverter" />
    <conversionRule conversionWord="wex" converterClass="org.springframework.boot.logging.logback.WhitespaceThrowableProxyConverter" />
    <conversionRule conversionWord="wEx" converterClass="org.springframework.boot.logging.logback.ExtendedWhitespaceThrowableProxyConverter" />

    <appender name="STDOUT" class="ch.qos.logback.core.ConsoleAppender">
        <layout class="ch.qos.logback.classic.PatternLayout">
            <Pattern>
                %clr(%d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS}){faint} %clr(%5p) %clr(${PID:- }){magenta} %clr(---){faint} %clr([%15.15t]){faint} %clr(%-40.40logger{39}){cyan} %clr(:){faint} %m%n%wEx
            </Pattern>
        </layout>
    </appender>

    <root level="info">
        <appender-ref ref="STDOUT" />
    </root>

</configuration>
1
  • are those conversion rules supposed to bring spring-defined colouring to logback? It's not working for me – jediz Oct 1 '19 at 19:34
9

It's been some time since this question was asked but since I had the problem myself recently and couldn't find an answer I started digging a bit deeper and found a solution that worked for me.

I ended up using the debugger and take a look at the default appenders attached to the logger.

I found this pattern to be working as desired for me:

<pattern>%d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS} %5p 18737 --- [%t] %-40.40logger{39} : %m%n%wEx</pattern>

EDIT: The pattern is not entirely correct, I saw that runtime some values had already been instantiated (in this case 18737 ---) i will look into the proper variable to substitute there. It does contain the format for fixed length columns though

EDIT 2: Ok, I took another look at the debugger contents. This you can also do yourself by looking at the contents of a logger instance: Debugger(eclipse) Logger Contents

So I ended up using the pattern used in the consoleAppender:

%clr(%d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS}){faint} %clr(%5p) %clr(18971){magenta} %clr(---){faint} %clr([%15.15t]){faint} %clr(%-40.40logger{39}){cyan} %clr(:){faint} %m%n%wEx

As can be seen here:

Debugger: detailed contents of the encoder pattern

2
  • Thanks, in other answer I added full working logback.xml with this pattern. It requires conversionRules elements from spring default.xml to work. – Lukasz Frankowski Dec 14 '17 at 6:56
  • 1
    Why do you have the value 18971 explicitly in the pattern? Isn't this a meaningful variable which changes between different launches? – Snackoverflow Feb 9 '19 at 12:38
6

Logging pattern can be configured using application.properties file

Example :

# Logging pattern for the console
logging.pattern.console=%d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss} - %msg%n
1

You can use below pattern :

%d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS} %5p ${sys:PID} --- [%15.15t] %-40.40logger{1.} : %m%n%wEx
0

For those who'd like to use Łukasz Frankowski's answer (which looks like the cleanest solution here), but in a groovy version, the "problematic" {$PID:- } part can be expanded like in the following:

logback-spring.groovy

import ch.qos.logback.classic.PatternLayout
import ch.qos.logback.core.ConsoleAppender
import org.springframework.boot.logging.logback.ColorConverter
import org.springframework.boot.logging.logback.ExtendedWhitespaceThrowableProxyConverter
import org.springframework.boot.logging.logback.WhitespaceThrowableProxyConverter

import static ch.qos.logback.classic.Level.INFO

conversionRule("clr", ColorConverter)
conversionRule("wex", WhitespaceThrowableProxyConverter)
conversionRule("wEx", ExtendedWhitespaceThrowableProxyConverter)

appender("STDOUT", ConsoleAppender) {
    layout(PatternLayout) {
        def PID = System.getProperty("PID") ?: ''
        pattern = "%clr(%d{yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS}){faint} %clr(%5p) %clr(${PID}){magenta} %clr(---){faint} %clr([%15.15t]){faint} %clr(%-40.40logger{39}){cyan} %clr(:){faint} %m%n%wEx"
    }

}
root(INFO, ["STDOUT"])
0

Note that you can also customize the imported properties.

But beware that at least with spring boot 1.4.3 if you want to customize the properties imported from the defaults.xml, then the customization should be placed BEFORE the include.

For example this customizes the priority to 100 character wide:

<configuration scan="true">
    <property name="LOG_LEVEL_PATTERN" value="%100p" />

    <!-- use Spring default values -->
    <include resource="org/springframework/boot/logging/logback/defaults.xml"/>

    <appender name="CONSOLE" class="ch.qos.logback.core.ConsoleAppender">
        <layout class="ch.qos.logback.classic.PatternLayout">
            <Pattern>${CONSOLE_LOG_PATTERN}</Pattern>
        </layout>
    </appender>

    <logger name="hu" level="debug" additivity="false">
        <appender-ref ref="CONSOLE" />
    </logger>

    <root level="warn">
        <appender-ref ref="CONSOLE" />
    </root>

</configuration>

But this is NOT:

<configuration scan="true">
    <!-- use Spring default values -->
    <include resource="org/springframework/boot/logging/logback/defaults.xml"/>
    <property name="LOG_LEVEL_PATTERN" value="%100p" />

    <appender name="CONSOLE" class="ch.qos.logback.core.ConsoleAppender">
        <layout class="ch.qos.logback.classic.PatternLayout">
            <Pattern>${CONSOLE_LOG_PATTERN}</Pattern>
        </layout>
    </appender>

    <logger name="hu" level="debug" additivity="false">
        <appender-ref ref="CONSOLE" />
    </logger>

    <root level="warn">
        <appender-ref ref="CONSOLE" />
    </root>

</configuration>

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