When is it important to pass props to super(), and why?

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(); // or super(props) ?
  }
}
up vote 486 down vote accepted

There is only one reason when one needs to pass props to super():

When you want to access this.props in constructor.

Passing:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {    
    constructor(props) {
        super(props)

        console.log(this.props)
        // -> { icon: 'home', … }
    }
}

Not passing:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {    
    constructor(props) {
        super()

        console.log(this.props)
        // -> undefined

        // Props parameter is still available
        console.log(props)
        // -> { icon: 'home', … }
    }

    render() {
        // No difference outside constructor
        console.log(this.props)
        // -> { icon: 'home', … }
    }
}

Note that passing or not passing props to super has no effect on later uses of this.props outside constructor. That is render, shouldComponentUpdate, or event handlers always have access to it.

This is explicitly said in one Sophie Alpert's answer to a similar question.


The documentation—State and Lifecycle, Adding Local State to a Class, point 2—recommends:

Class components should always call the base constructor with props.

However, no reason is provided. We can speculate it is either because of subclassing or for future compatibility.

(Thanks @MattBrowne for the link)

  • 9
    I think you are correct, despite the other answers getting more votes. this.props is undefined unless passed to super(). Either way, it does not affect later rendering or availability of this.props in the render() function. – Micros Jan 29 '16 at 11:11
  • 2
    @Rotareti, no, actually rest of the class does not depend on this construct, that is the point. Component receives props by a different way that by constructor parameter. And since you pass initial props to super, you have reference to them in the constructor. – Robin Pokorný Jul 17 '16 at 18:42
  • 3
    According to the React documentation, you should always pass props to super(): facebook.github.io/react/docs/…. I'm not sure why, since as you point out this.props is accessible in other methods either way...perhaps they're recommending this for future compatibility in case future versions of React might want to do something with props in the constructor? – Matt Browne Jan 1 '17 at 13:45
  • 12
    Maybe I'm just opening a can of worms here, but why ever pass props to super when, as you pointed out, the props parameter is right there available for us to use within the constructor, and this.props works everywhere else? Is there a benefit at all to using this.props over just props? Is it bad practice to destructure off of props in the constructor? I think I'm still failing to see a case when you'd ever need to pass props to super, but I'm willing to bet it's just my ignorance, ha. – indiesquidge Aug 22 '17 at 4:30
  • 5
    If you use super(props), you can call methods that use this.props in from constructor, like this.doStuffUsingThisDotProps(), without having to pass on the props parameter to those methods/functions. I just wrote a constructor doing this, which seemingly would require me to use super(props) first, according to the answers to this question. – Victor Zamanian Jan 9 at 9:03

In this example, you are extending the React.Component class, and per the ES2015 spec, a child class constructor cannot make use of this until super() has been called; also, ES2015 class constructors have to call super() if they are subclasses.

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    console.log(this); // Reference Error
  }

  render() {
    return <div>Hello {this.props.name}</div>;
  }
}

By contrast:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    console.log(this); // this logged to console
  }

  render() {
    return <div>Hello {this.props.name}</div>;
  }
}

More detail as per this excellent stack overflow answer

You may see examples of components created by extending the React.Component class that do not call super() but you'll notice these don't have a constructor, hence why it is not necessary.

class MyOtherComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <div>Hi {this.props.name}</div>;
  }
}

One point of confusion I've seen from some developers I've spoken to is that the components that have no constructor and therefore do not call super() anywhere, still have this.props available in the render() method. Remember that this rule and this need to create a this binding for the constructor only applies to the constructor.

  • 14
    Thanks a lot for your answer, but it doesn't answer my original question (difference between super() and super(props)). – Misha Moroshko Dec 6 '15 at 7:18

When you pass props to super, the props get assigned to this. Take a look at the following scenario:

constructor(props) {
    super();
    console.log(this.props) //undefined
}

How ever when you do :

constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    console.log(this.props) //props will get logged.
}

As per source code

function ReactComponent(props, context) {
  this.props = props;
  this.context = context;
}

you must pass props every time you have props and you don't put them into this.props manually.

  • 1
    I'm still not clear on this. if you look at these two components, you can see one calls super(props) and the other doesn't. But their consumers both set props. What is the difference? – Tyrsius Oct 23 '15 at 18:41
  • Does this mean that this.props = props and super(props) are the same thing? – reectrix Dec 15 '15 at 20:25
  • 1
    This is not true. ReactElement actually sets this.props from the ‘outside’–irrespective of what is done in the constructor. – Robin Pokorný Jan 25 '16 at 14:58

super() is used to call the parent constructor.

super(props) would pass props to the parent constructor.

From your example, super(props) would call the React.Component constructor passing in props as the argument.

More information on super: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/super

  • 15
    Yes, that's what it does. But why? And when is one of the two forms required in React? – Bergi Sep 28 '15 at 12:27

Here is the fiddle I've made: https://jsfiddle.net/beshanoe/zpxbLw4j/1/. It shows that props are assigned not in the constructor by default. As I understand they are assinged in the method React.createElement. Hence super(props) should be called only when the superclass's constructor manually assings props to this.props. If you just extend the React.Component calling super(props) will do nothing with props. Maybe It will be changed in the next versions of React.

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