14

Why does the following code compile in clang++?

Are there any c++ flags to prevent this from happening - I would like the compiler to throw an error because I am passing a std::uint64_t as an argument to a function that accepts std::uint16_t.

#include <cstdint>
using namespace std;

void foo(uint16_t x) {
}

int main() {
    uint64_t x = 10000;
    foo(x);
    return 0;
}
4
  • 3
    Narrowing conversions are permitted in C++, and unsigned narrowing conversions are well-defined – M.M Jun 1 '15 at 20:57
  • 13
    Adding -Werror=conversion will cause your example to not compile. – Praetorian Jun 1 '15 at 21:06
  • 2
    ..or just -Wall -Wextra -Werror -pedantic – ikh Jun 2 '15 at 11:26
  • 1
    @JohnBollinger Simple: It's error-prone. An uint16_t and an uint64_t are different types. These implicit conversions caused enough headaches. I'd recommend to always set the warning levels high enough to cover such things. – Marco13 Jun 2 '15 at 15:45
33

you can delete a function in c++11

void foo(uint64_t) = delete;

it works by adding the signature at function overload resolution, and if it was a better match, an error occurs. You can also make it generic to allow only you original signature

template <class T> void foo( T&& ) = delete;
5
  • How is this responsive to the question posed? – John Bollinger Jun 1 '15 at 20:56
  • 5
    he asked how to prevent it from happening and this will effectively prevent it. – Puppy Jun 1 '15 at 20:57
  • 2
    @JohnBollinger: The given program would fail to compile with this added, would it not? – Guvante Jun 1 '15 at 20:57
  • 3
    because it is what he ask, the compiler to throw an error if someone provide an uint64 to the function receiving a uint16 – galop1n Jun 1 '15 at 20:57
  • He first asked why his code compiles, which is not addressed in this answer. Fair enough, though, that this does answer the second part. – John Bollinger Jun 1 '15 at 20:59
9

You can also use enable_if as a SFINAE return parameter

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdint>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, uint16_t>::value>::type 
foo(T x) 
{
    std::cout << "uint16_t" << std::endl;
}

template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<T, uint16_t>::value>::type 
foo(T x)
{
    std::cout << "rest" << std::endl;
}

int main() {
    uint16_t x = 10000;
    uint64_t y = 100000;
    foo(x); // picks up uint16_t version
    foo(y); // picks up anything else, but NOT uint16_t
    return 0;
}

In this way you can have one overload that deals specifically with uint16_t, and another overload that deals with anything else.

2
  • This is good but it also prevents widening conversions (as does the other answer). It'd be nice if the function could accept uint8_t values for example, and maybe even literals whose value fits in uint16_t. Someone suggested using std::common_type here however I don't think that would work for uint16_t because of integer promotion to int – M.M Jun 1 '15 at 21:06
  • @MattMcNabb hmm, this seems a bit more tricky, and it is actually interesting: how to accept anything that "fits" into the parameter. Well, there is a "way": brute force, specify the template explicitly, like foo<int16_t>(x);. Not very pretty though. – vsoftco Jun 1 '15 at 21:07
6

Here's a solution that would allow widening conversions and prevent the narrowing ones:

#include <cstdint>
#include <type_traits>

void foo(uint16_t x) {
}

template <class T>
typename std::enable_if<sizeof(uint16_t) < sizeof(T)>::type foo(const T& t) = delete;

int main() {
    uint64_t x = 10000;
    uint16_t y = 10000;
    uint8_t z = 100;
    // foo(x); // ERROR: narrowing conversion
    foo(y); // OK: no conversion
    foo(z); // OK: widening conversion
    return 0;
}

In case you'd also like to disallow calls with arguments of signed types (conversions between signed and unsigned types are not "lossless"), you could use the following declaration instead:

#include <cstdint>
#include <type_traits>

void foo(uint16_t x) {
}

template <class T>
typename std::enable_if<(sizeof(uint16_t) < sizeof(T)) ||
                        (std::is_signed<T>::value != std::is_signed<uint16_t>::value)
                       >::type
foo(const T& t) = delete;

int main() {
    uint64_t u64 = 10000;
    uint16_t u16 = 10000;
    uint8_t u8 = 100;
    int64_t s64 = 10000;
    int16_t s16 = 10000;
    int8_t s8 = 100; 

    //foo(u64); // ERROR: narrowing conversion
    foo(u16); // OK: no conversion
    foo(u8); // OK: widening conversion
    //foo(s64); // ERROR: narrowing conversion AND signed/unsigned mismatch
    //foo(s16); // ERROR: signed/unsigned mismatch
    //foo(s8); // ERROR: signed/unsigned mismatch

    return 0;
}
5

If you want to allow widening conversions, but forbid narrowing conversions, perhaps:

void foo(uint16_t x) {
}

template <class T>
void foo( const T&& t )
{
    return foo(uint16_t{t});
}

This forces all types except uint16_t itself to go through list-initialization, which forbids narrowing conversions.

It doesn't work so well if you already have a number of overloads, though.

10
  • Unfortunately narrowing is not required to result in an error, see e.g. stackoverflow.com/q/28466069/3093378. For example, this works: ideone.com/DHqBYL . Maybe I'm missing something. – vsoftco Jun 1 '15 at 21:14
  • @vsoftco "if a narrowing conversion (see below) is required to convert the element to T, the program is ill-formed", from 8.5.4 – Barry Jun 1 '15 at 21:25
  • @Barry yes, it is ill formed, however the compiler is not required to emit an error. And in fact compiles the program. – vsoftco Jun 1 '15 at 21:26
  • @vsoftco: If you configure your build settings to continue when an ill-formed program is encountered, you get what you ask for. A conforming compiler will never be silent about this, and most will error unless specifically configured not to. – Ben Voigt Jun 1 '15 at 21:27
  • Yes, indeed, you get an warning with -Wall -Wextra on g++. However I found it extremely odd that without enabling warnings you don't get any diagnostic, since I was sure that the program won't even compile. – vsoftco Jun 1 '15 at 21:29
4

Although most answers here are technically correct, you will most likely not want the behaviour to apply only to this function, so a "code level" solution that you have to write for each of these conversion cases is probably not what you want.

On a "project/compilation level" you can add this flag to warn you about these conversions:

-Wconversion

or if you prefer directly treat them as errors:

-Werror=conversion
1
  • 1
    Note that this won't warn (tested in GCC 4.9.2) about conversion from signed int16_t to unsigned uint16_t, which too can cause invalid value to be passed into function. You can add -Wsign-conversion (or-Werror=sign-conversion) to detect changes in signedness. – Alexander Revo Jun 2 '15 at 12:33

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