7

I may be doing something incorrect, but it is not apparent. I have the following code:

 namespace test
    {
        class Program
            {
             static void Main(string[] args)

                {
                    using (var system = ActorSystem.Create("MySystem"))
                    {
                        var testPassRetriever = system.ActorOf<PrintActor>();
                        var task = testPassRetriever.Ask<PrintActorMsg>(new PrintActorMsg());

                        // prevent the application from exiting before message is handled
                        task.Wait();
                        Console.WriteLine("Finished.");
                        Console.ReadLine();
                    }
                }
        }
        class PrintActorMsg{}

        class PrintActor : ReceiveActor
        {
            public PrintActor()
            {
             Receive<PrintActorMsg>(msg => Console.WriteLine("foo"));
            }
        }
}// namespace test

The issue is that the Task returned by Ask never completes. Its status stays in the Waiting for Activation state. "Foo" does get printed on the command line so I know the actor is processing the Print message. Is there something else I am supposed to do in the overridden actor PrintMsg to mark the task completed?

11
  • Wouldn't Task.Run benefit you here?
    – whoisj
    Jun 1, 2015 at 21:08
  • 2
    I don't think so, I believe that the task is already running (handled by the Akka.net framework). I am getting results of the task being successfully run. I just wait for ever on task completion. Jun 1, 2015 at 21:11
  • 1
    I think that doing that would bypass AKKA.net and would not be helpful, since I am trying to use Akka.net to handle the multithreading for me. Jun 1, 2015 at 21:15
  • 1
    It does not. The wait call never returns. Task.Run(() => testPassRetriever.Ask<PrintActorMsg>(new PrintActorMsg())).Wait(); Jun 1, 2015 at 21:18
  • 1
    Let us continue this discussion in chat.
    – whoisj
    Jun 1, 2015 at 21:23

2 Answers 2

11

You use the ask pattern, but never send a message back. The ask task will only be completed when a message is received from the actor. The (sometimes advised) tell or fire-and-forget pattern doesn't do this.

1
  • 7
    I had to change the PrintActor to call Sender.Tell(new PrintActorMsg()); Jun 1, 2015 at 21:38
0

Just for completeness for future readers, since OP's original question didn't appear to want any response / result payload back from the called Actor, the OP should be using the Tell pattern, not Ask, e.g. for fire and forget dispatch scenarios:

 class PrintActor : ReceiveActor
 {
    public PrintActor()
    {
        // Response to the message, with no response
        Receive<PrintActorMsg>(msg => Console.WriteLine("foo"));
    }
 }

And in the calling program

var myActor = system.ActorOf<PrintActor>();
// One way 'fire and forget'
await myActor.Tell(new PrintActorMsg());

Whereas if Ask request-response type interaction is required, then the receive actor needs to provide a response via an explicit Tell back to the sender (PrintResponse is a new response message class):

 public class ResponseActor : ReceiveActor
 {
    public ResponseActor()
    {
       Receive<PrintActorMsg>(msg => {
         Console.WriteLine("foo"));

         // ... Other handling code here

         // Must return a response for an Ask
         Sender.Tell(new PrintResponse(), Self);
       });
    }
 }

And called like so

var response = await actor.Ask<PrintResponse>(new PrintActorMsg(), TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));

Note that adding exception handling is also a good idea.

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