3

I wish to use a multidimensional MaskedArray as an index array:

Data:

In [149]: np.ma.arange(10, 60, 2)
Out[149]: 
masked_array(data = [10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58],
             mask = False,
       fill_value = 999999)

Indices:

In [140]: np.ma.array(np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5), 
                      mask=np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5) % 3)
Out[140]: 
masked_array(data =
 [[0 -- -- 3 --]
 [-- 6 -- -- 9]
 [-- -- 12 -- --]
 [15 -- -- 18 --]],
             mask =
 [[False  True  True False  True]
 [ True False  True  True False]
 [ True  True False  True  True]
 [False  True  True False  True]],
       fill_value = 999999)

Desired Output:

In [151]: np.ma.arange(10, 60, 2)[np.ma.array(np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5), mask=np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5) % 3)]
Out[151]: 
masked_array(data =
 [[10 -- -- 16 --]
 [-- 22 -- -- 28]
 [-- -- 34 -- --]
 [40 -- -- 46 --]],
             mask =
 False,
       fill_value = 999999)

Actual Output:

In [160]: np.ma.arange(10, 60, 2)[np.ma.array(np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5), mask=np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5) % 3)]
Out[160]: 
masked_array(data =
 [[10 12 14 16 18]
 [20 22 24 26 28]
 [30 32 34 36 38]
 [40 42 44 46 48]],
             mask =
 False,
       fill_value = 999999)

Why does the resulting array lose its mask? According to an answer here: Indexing with Masked Arrays in numpy, this method of indexing is very bad. Why?

  • 1
    Why don't you just create a new masked array that uses the mask of your indexing array? i.e. new_masked_array = np.ma.masked_array(np.arange(10, 60, 2), indexing_array.mask, where in your example, you'd previously define indexing_array = np.ma.masked_array(np.arange(20).reshape((4,5)), np.arange(20).reshape((4, 5))%3) – Praveen Jun 2 '15 at 0:58
3

Looks like indexing with a masked array just ignores the mask. Without digging much into the docs or code, I'd say the numpy array indexing has no special knowledge of the masked array subclass. The array you get is just the normal arange(20) indexing.

But you could perform normal indexing, and 'copy' the mask:

In [13]: data=np.arange(10,60,2)

In [14]: mI = np.ma.array(np.arange(20).reshape(4,5),mask=np.arange(20).reshape(4,5) % 3)

...

In [16]: np.ma.array(data[mI], mask=mI.mask)
Out[16]: 
masked_array(data =
 [[10 -- -- 16 --]
 [-- 22 -- -- 28]
 [-- -- 34 -- --]
 [40 -- -- 46 --]],
             mask =
 [[False  True  True False  True]
 [ True False  True  True False]
 [ True  True False  True  True]
 [False  True  True False  True]],
       fill_value = 999999)

Do you really need to combine indexing and masking into one operation (and masking array). This operation would work just as well if the mask were separate.

 I = np.arange(20).reshape(4,5)
 m = (np.arange(20).reshape(4,5) % 3)>0
 np.ma.array(data[I], mask=m)

If the masked index elements are invalid (e.g. out of range), you could fill them with something valid (followed by masking if needed):

data[mI.filled(fill_value=0)]

Have you seen in the numpy masked array docs an example of using a masked array to index another one? Or are all the masked arrays 'data'? It's possible that the designers never intended you to use masked indexes.


The masked array .choose works because it uses a method which has been subclassed for masked arrays. Regular indexing probably converts the index to a regular array with something like: data[np.asarray(mI)].


The __getitem__ method for the MaskedArray class starts:

    def __getitem__(self, indx):

        Return the item described by i, as a masked array.

        """
        # This test is useful, but we should keep things light...
#        if getmask(indx) is not nomask:
#            msg = "Masked arrays must be filled before they can be used as indices!"
#            raise IndexError(msg)

This is the method that is called when performing [] on a masked array. Evidently the developer(s) considered formally blocking the use of a masked index, but decided it wasn't an important enough issue. See np.ma.core.py file for more details.

0

Try using the choose method like this:

np.ma.array(np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5), mask=np.arange(20).reshape(4, 5) % 3).
            choose(np.ma.arange(10, 60, 2))

which gives:

masked_array(data =
 [[10 -- -- 16 --]
 [-- 22 -- -- 28]
 [-- -- 34 -- --]
 [40 -- -- 46 --]],
             mask =
 [[False  True  True False  True]
 [ True False  True  True False]
 [ True  True False  True  True]
 [False  True  True False  True]],
       fill_value = 999999)
  • This an interesting solution, but not generally applicable. choose has a serious limitation: mI.choose(np.arange(0,32)) produces an error: ValueError: Need between 2 and (32) array objects (inclusive).. – hpaulj Jun 2 '15 at 4:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.