SO, i am debugging a very wild program that decrypts executable code at runtime, then executes it. The blob of code is about 2000 bytes.

I know on Windows in OllyDbg I could select the entire block and set a breakpoint if any bytes in that memory were executed.

I don't want to break if the code is read/written... just executed.

Can I do this with LLDB on Mac?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One approach would be to use lldb's support for scripting to set breakpoints over a whole range of addresses:

(lldb) script
>>> for a in range(0xabc000, 0xabc010):
...     lldb.target.BreakpointCreateByAddress(a)
... 

Another approach would be to call (from the lldb command line), the mprotect() function to remove execute permission from the page(s) including the code in question. Since you can only affect whole pages, this isn't as precise as you might like.

To learn what the current protection of the pages is, you need to use the vmmap -interleaved <pid> command in another shell.

If the program tries to execute code from pages which are not executable, it will get a SIGBUS or SIGSEGV signal, which lldb will normally catch and stop the process for.

If you want to allow the program to execute the code after all, mark it executable again and then let it continue. You might use the finish command or otherwise set a breakpoint at some point when you think execution has exited the pages you're interested in and then remove execution permission again. However, other threads may get a chance to execute the code you're trying to watch during that interval.

Note that the program will presumably mark the pages as executable after writing the code to them, so you need to remove the execute permission after it has done that.

  • Thanks, buddy! That's exactly what I was looking for. – Andy Jun 2 '15 at 15:43

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