1

I'm trying to write an utility that reverses lines of input. The following just prints the lines as they are though:

#!/bin/sed -f
#insert newline at the beginning
s/^/\n/
#while the newline hasnt moved to the end of pattern space, rotate
: loop
/\n$/{!s/\(.*\)\(.$\)/\2\1/;!b loop}
#delete the newline
s/\n//

Any ideas on what's wrong?

  • 3
    See here for a solution. – potong Jun 2 '15 at 8:36
  • Was a challenge ? Why not using tac ? – alexscott Sep 22 '15 at 14:43
5
/\n$/{!s/\(.*\)\(.$\)/\2\1/;!b loop}
  • the ! is after an address/range normaly
  • the !b (not than goto if I understang your meaning) is maybe a t (if substitution occur, goto)
  • $ is not part of the last group but just after

so this line is:

/\n$/ !{s/\(.*\)\(.\)$/\2\1/;t loop}

now, this code just (in final) do nothing it add a new line at start and move it until the end by swapping last to first character and does not reveverse anything.

sed 'G
:loop
s/\(.\)\(\n.*\)/\2\1/
t loop
s/.//' YourFile

should do the trick

@TobySpeight still enhance the code removing the need of a 1st group (code adapted)

  • 1
    The substitution can be simplified, as the first term is redundant - s/\(.\)\(\n.*\)/\2\1/ – Toby Speight Jun 2 '15 at 9:14
  • right, i was starting from other side first so forget to reread. i adapt the solution with this – NeronLeVelu Jun 2 '15 at 9:37
1

Solution 1

$ echo -e '123\n456\n789' |sed -nr '/\n/!G;s/(.)(.*\n)/&\2\1/;/^\n/!D;s/\n//p'
321
654
987

the core ideas:

  1. we need a loop to deal with each line, and fortunately we can use D command can simulate a loop;
  2. we need to loop over ONE line, which is difficult, because sed deals with one line every time; but we can use s and D command to simulate a loop over one line.
  3. how to avoid infinite loop? we need a flag char to identify the end of each line, \n is the perfect choice.
  4. D command delete chars util first \n in the pattern space every time, and then force sed jump to its first command, which is a loop actually! So we also need to add some useless placeholder to be deleted by D command before the final string, and we can just use contents in current line before \n (\n also included).

Explains:

  1. /\n/!G: if current pattern space contain \n, which means this command is in a loop of dealing with one line; otherwise, use G command to append the \n and hold space to the pattern space (sed will delete \n of every line before putting it into pattern space), the content of pattern space after G command is the origin content and a \n.
  2. s/(.)(.*\n)/&\2\1/;: use s command to delete the first char (util \n) and then insert it after the final string.
  3. /^\n/!D;s/\n//p: if current pattern space starts with \n, which means this line has been resolved already, so use s/\n//p to delete the flag char: \n and print the final string; otherwise use D command to delete the useless placeholder, and then jump to the first command to deal with the second char...

To make a summary, the contents in pattern space in a loop are shown as the followings:

123\n [(1)(23\n)] =s=> 123\n23\n1 [(123\n)(23\n)(1)] =D=> 23\n1
23\n1 [(2)(3\n)1] =s=> 23\n3\n21 [(23\n)(3\n)(2)1] =D=> 3\n21
3\n21 [(3)(\n)21] =s=> 3\n\n321 [(3\n)(\n)(3)21] =D=> \n321
\n321 [()(\n)321] =s=> \n321 =!D=> \n321 =s-p=> 321

There are some derived solutions:

Solution 2

the placeholder can be set another string ending with a \n:

$ echo -e '123\n456\n789' |sed -nr '/\n/!G;s/(.)(.*\n)/USELESS\n\2\1/;/^\n/!D;s/\n//p'
321
654
987

Solution 3

Use a direct loop instead of obscure D command

$ echo -e '123\n456\n789' |sed -nr '/\n/!G;s/(.)(.*\n)/&\2\1/;Tend;D;:end;s/\n//p'
321
654
987

Solution 4

Use . to fetch the first char \n

$ echo -e '123\n456\n789' |sed -nr '/\n/!G;s/(.)(.*\n)/&\2\1/;/^\n/!D;s/.//p'
321
654
987

Solution 5

$ echo -e '123\n456\n789' |sed -nr ':loop;/\n/!G;s/(.)(.*\n)/\2\1/;tloop;s/.//p'
321
654
987

This solution is much easier to understand, the contents in pattern space res shown as the followings:

123\n [(1)(23\n)] =s=> 23\n1 [(23\n)(1)]
23\n1 [(2)(3\n)1] =s=> 3\n21 [(3\n)(2)1]
3\n21 [(3)(\n)21] =s=> \n321 [(\n)(3)21]
\n321 [()(\n)321] =s=> \n321 =s=> 321
0

The problem is you are using the wrong tool for the job and trying to understand/use constructs that became obsolete in the mid-1970s when awk was invented.

$ cat file
tsuj
esu
na
etaorporppa
loot

$ awk -v FS= '{rev=""; for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) rev = $i rev; print rev}' file
just
use
an
approproate
tool

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