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Is is possible to run some permutation-based function using mclapply in a reproducible way regardless of number of threads and OS?
Below is a toy example. Hashing of the resulting list of permutated vectors is just for convenience of comparing the results. I tried different RNGkind ("L'Ecuyer-CMRG"), different settings for mc.preschedule and mc.set.seed. So far no luck to make them all identical.

library("parallel")
library("digest")

set.seed(1)
m <- mclapply(1:10, function(x) sample(1:10),
              mc.cores=2, mc.set.seed = F)
digest(m, 'crc32')

set.seed(1)
m <- mclapply(1:10, function(x) sample(1:10),
              mc.cores=4, mc.set.seed = F)
digest(m, 'crc32')

set.seed(1)
m <- mclapply(1:10, function(x) sample(1:10),
              mc.cores=2, mc.set.seed = F)
digest(m, 'crc32')

set.seed(1)
m <- mclapply(1:10, function(x) sample(1:10),
              mc.cores=1, mc.set.seed = F)
digest(m, 'crc32')

set.seed(1)
m <- lapply(1:10, function(x) sample(1:10))
digest(m, 'crc32') # this is equivalent to what I get on Windows.

sessionInfo() just in case:

> sessionInfo()
R version 3.2.0 (2015-04-16)
Platform: x86_64-apple-darwin13.4.0 (64-bit)
Running under: OS X 10.9.5 (Mavericks)

locale:
[1] en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8/C/en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8

attached base packages:
[1] parallel  stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base     

other attached packages:
[1] digest_0.6.8

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
[1] tools_3.2.0
2
  • 1
    I ran into a similar problem at work. Ultimately, our solution was to set the seed within the function based on a value of the data being referenced (so you might set the seed based on the current value of x) - it's not true random, but neither are the pseudo-random generators and we were just as ill-suited to guess / manipulate the condition of the random number flow given that configuration. Jun 3, 2015 at 4:12
  • @ElizabethAB Thank for an inspiring comment. In your case, however, the permutations will be rock solid reproducible. See one solution/hack below.
    – Vlad
    Jun 3, 2015 at 18:37

2 Answers 2

1

Another approach is to first generate the samples that you would like to use and call mclapply on the samples:

    library("parallel")
    library("digest")

    input<-1:10
    set.seed(1)
    nsamp<-20
    ## Generate and store all the random samples
    samples<-lapply(1:nsamp, function(x){ sample(input) })

    ## apply the algorithm "diff" on every sample
    ncore0<-  lapply(samples, diff)
    ncore1<-mclapply(samples, diff, mc.cores=1)
    ncore2<-mclapply(samples, diff, mc.cores=2)
    ncore3<-mclapply(samples, diff, mc.cores=3)
    ncore4<-mclapply(samples, diff, mc.cores=4)

    ## all equal
    all.equal(ncore0,ncore1)
    all.equal(ncore0,ncore2)
    all.equal(ncore0,ncore3)
    all.equal(ncore0,ncore4)

This assures the reproducibility at the expense of using more memory and slightly longer running time since the computation done on each sample is typically the most time-consuming operation.

Note: The use of mc.set.seed = F in your question will generate the same sample for each core, which is probably not what you want.

0

One solution I came up with is to generate a complementary vector with seeds. mclapply or lapply iterates over the index that points both to the argument and the corresponding seed. Kind of hack, but works.

library("parallel")
library("digest")

input <- 1:10

# make random seed vector of length(input).
set.seed(1)
seeds <- sample.int(length(input), replace=TRUE)

f <- function(idx){ 
    # input[i] # do whatever with the input
    set.seed(seeds[idx]) # set to proper seed
    sample(1:10)}

digest(mclapply(seq_along(input), f, mc.cores=2), 'crc32')
digest(mclapply(seq_along(input), f, mc.cores=4), 'crc32')
digest(mclapply(seq_along(input), f, mc.cores=2), 'crc32')
digest(mclapply(seq_along(input), f, mc.cores=1), 'crc32')
digest(lapply(seq_along(input), f), 'crc32')

The issue with this trick is that when the code is wrapped the set.seed inside the function interferes with the outside set seed. For example,

set.seed(123)
outcome1a <- digest(mclapply(seq_along(input), f, mc.cores=4), 'crc32')
outcome1b <- digest(sample(1:10), 'crc32')

set.seed(123)
outcome2a <- digest(lapply(seq_along(input), f), 'crc32')
outcome2b <- digest(sample(1:10), 'crc32')
identical(outcome1a, outcome2a)
identical(outcome1b, outcome2b)

While, indeed, outcomes "a" are the same, the outcomes of stochastic computations that follow right after, that is "b" are affected and different. I guess one hack can be to wrap the mclapply/lapply function in such a way that there is random seed generated upfront based on user input then after the execution the wrapper resets the seed to that value.

library("parallel")
library("digest")

wrapply <- function(input, cores){
    recover.seed <- floor(runif(1)*1e6)
    seeds <- sample.int(length(input), replace=TRUE)
    f <- function(idx){ 
        # input[i] # do whatever with the input
        set.seed(seeds[idx]) # set to proper seed
        sample(1:10)
    }
    if(is.null(cores)){
        out <- digest(lapply(seq_along(input), f), 'crc32')
    }else{
        out <- digest(mclapply(seq_along(input), f, mc.cores=cores), 'crc32')
    }
    set.seed(recover.seed)
    return(out)
}

input <- 1:10

set.seed(123)
outcome1a <- wrapply(input, cores=4)
outcome1b <- digest(sample(1:10), 'crc32')

set.seed(123)
outcome2a <- wrapply(input, cores=NULL)
outcome2b <- digest(sample(1:10), 'crc32')

identical(outcome1a, outcome2a)
identical(outcome1b, outcome2b)

In this case outcomes "a" and "b" are indentical.

0

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