I am new to JNDI and i read the online material by oracle:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/jndi/tutorial/getStarted/overview/index.html

It says JNDI has two API's viz:

1) JNDI API
2) JNDI SPI

Further, it says to use JNDI we should have JNDI classes as well as Service providers.

From what I understand, Service provider is the actual resource (naming or directory) e.g. LDAP or DNS (Is this my understanding correct)?

I have following doubts:

a) JNDI API: We write application and use JNDI API's to do lookup etc. Now, who does implement JNDI API? Are they complete implementation in itself i.e implemented by JDK providers themselves or by service providers?

b) JNDI SPI: what exactly is it? Are JNDI SPI specific to a service e.g. LDAP server? Who provides implementations of JNDI SPI. FYI i saw the source code of javax.naming.spi (among others) I saw there are some interface and some classes. And are these JNDI SPI's used in the application side (like If i am writing a simple application to do lookup from LDAP, so would this jar be in application)

Any help appreciated a lot.

EDIT:

Here is one simple JNDI program.

import javax.naming.Context;
import javax.naming.InitialContext;
import javax.naming.NamingException;

public class JNDIExample {

    public static void main(String s[]) {

         Hashtable env = new Hashtable();
         env.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, "com.sun.jndi.fscontext.RefFSContextFactory");

// Is "com.sun.jndi.fscontext.RefFSContextFactory" the SPI API?
// What exactly is this?
         Context ctx = new InitialContext(env);
         try {
                // Create the initial context
                Context ctx = new InitialContext(env);

               // Look up an object
               Object obj = ctx.lookup(name);

               // Print it
               System.out.println(name + " is bound to: " + obj);

         } catch (NamingException e) {
              System.err.println("Problem looking up " + name + ": " + e);
         }
    } 
}

With respect to above example, i have following doubts:

  1. In this above example we are mainly using javax.naming.* stuff; who implements them?

  2. Where is the SPI involved in this?

  • Don't use code formatting for text that isn't code. – user207421 Jun 5 '15 at 2:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

a) JNDI API: We write application and use JNDI API's to do lookup etc. Now, who does implement JNDI API? Are they complete implementation in itself i.e implemented by JDK providers themselves or by service providers?

By whoeveer has registered an ObjectFactory. In a JRE application this probably won't extend beyond the JRE itself. In a Servlet or J2EE container it will definitely extend to include the container itself, for java:comp resources, and possibly the Web-app itself as well.

b) JNDI SPI: what exactly is it?

It is a Service Provider Interface that service providers must implement.

Are JNDI SPI specific to a service e.g. LDAP server?

Yes.

Who provides implementations of JNDI SPI.

Almost entirely the JRE itself.

Are these JNDI SPI's used in the application side

They can be, at least as far as ObjectFactory, but it isn't usual.

(like If i am writing a simple application to do lookup from LDAP, so would this jar be in application)

No.

EDIT Re your new questions:

In this above example we are mainly using javax.naming.* stuff; who implements them?

The JRE, specifically the factory class you specified and its friends.

  1. Where is the SPI involved in this?

The factory class and friends implement the SPI.

  • Thanks for the info, i have added one more comment inside the code, could you please clarify that. Thanks a lot for your help. – CuriousMind Jun 6 '15 at 10:03
  • I've already answered it. – user207421 Jun 6 '15 at 10:23

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