7

I want to implement SIMD minmag and maxmag functions. As far as I understand these functions are

minmag(a,b) = |a|<|b| ? a : b
maxmag(a,b) = |a|>|b| ? a : b

I want these for float and double and my target hardware is Haswell. What I really need is code which calculates both. Here is what I have for SSE4.1 for double (the AVX code is almost identical)

static inline void maxminmag(__m128d & a, __m128d & b) {
    __m128d mask    = _mm_castsi128_pd(_mm_setr_epi32(-1,0x7FFFFFFF,-1,0x7FFFFFFF));
    __m128d aa      = _mm_and_pd(a,mask);
    __m128d ab      = _mm_and_pd(b,mask);
    __m128d cmp     = _mm_cmple_pd(ab,aa);
    __m128d cmpi    = _mm_xor_pd(cmp, _mm_castsi128_pd(_mm_set1_epi32(-1)));
    __m128d minmag  = _mm_blendv_pd(a, b, cmp);
    __m128d maxmag  = _mm_blendv_pd(a, b, cmpi);
    a = maxmag, b = minmag;
}

However, this is not as efficient as I would like. Is there a better method or at least an alternative worth considering? I would like to try to avoid port 1 since I already have many additions/subtractions using that port. The _mm_cmple_pd instrinsic goes to port 1.

The main function I am interested is this:

//given |a| > |b|
static inline doubledouble4 quick_two_sum(const double4 & a, const double4 & b)  {
    double4 s = a + b;
    double4 e = b - (s - a);
    return (doubledouble4){s, e};
}

So what I am really after is this

static inline doubledouble4 two_sum_MinMax(const double4 & a, const double4 & b) {
    maxminmag(a,b);       
    return quick_to_sum(a,b);
}

Edit: My goal is for two_sum_MinMax to be faster than two_sum below:

static inline doubledouble4 two_sum(const double4 &a, const double4 &b) {
        double4 s = a + b;
        double4 v = s - a;
        double4 e = (a - (s - v)) + (b - v);
        return (doubledouble4){s, e};
}

Edit: here is the ultimate function I'm after. It does 20 add/subs all of which go to port 1 on Haswell. Using my implementation of two_sum_MinMax in this question gets it down to 16 add/subs on port 1 but it has worse latency and is still slower. You can see the assembly for this function and read more about why I care about this at optimize-for-fast-multiplication-but-slow-addition-fma-and-doubledouble

static inline doublefloat4 adddd(const doubledouble4 &a, const doubledouble4 &b) {
        doubledouble4 s, t;
        s = two_sum(a.hi, b.hi);
        t = two_sum(a.lo, b.lo);
        s.lo += t.hi;
        s = quick_two_sum(s.hi, s.lo);
        s.lo += t.lo;
        s = quick_two_sum(s.hi, s.lo);
        return s;
        // 2*two_sum, 2 add, 2*quick_two_sum = 2*6 + 2 + 2*3 = 20 add
}
  • 1
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't minmag = blendv(a, b, cmp); maxmag = blendv(b, a, cmp); do the same as your code while reusing the same mask? – EOF Jun 3 '15 at 12:12
  • @EOF, it's maxmag = _mm_blendv_pd(a, b, cmpi); maybe I should have called it icmp instead of cmpi. The i for invert. – Z boson Jun 3 '15 at 12:18
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    Yes, I'm aware. But you can also invert the blend by reversing the arguments... – EOF Jun 3 '15 at 12:19
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    @PaulR, it's not Kahan summation. It's doing (double + double) to doubledouble addition. It's like 64-bit + 64-bit to 128-bit integer addition but for floating point instead of integer: s means sum and e means error (I assume). See this question and read the comments for why I'm interested in this. – Z boson Jun 3 '15 at 13:42
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    @Zboson This paper describes a method to do doubledouble addition with only 3 additional instructions when you don't know which number is greater in magnitude. I can't say whether it's faster than the solutions here since the 3 extra instructions are adds/subs which would contend for the same execution units. – Mysticial Jun 3 '15 at 14:27
7

Here's an alternate implementation which uses fewer instructions:

static inline void maxminmag_test(__m128d & a, __m128d & b) {
    __m128d cmp     = _mm_add_pd(a, b); // test for mean(a, b) >= 0
    __m128d amin    = _mm_min_pd(a, b);
    __m128d amax    = _mm_max_pd(a, b);
    __m128d minmag  = _mm_blendv_pd(amin, amax, cmp);
    __m128d maxmag  = _mm_blendv_pd(amax, amin, cmp);
    a = maxmag, b = minmag;
}

It uses a somewhat subtle algorithm (see below), combined with the fact that we can use the sign bit as a selection mask.

It also uses @EOF's suggestion of using only one mask and switching the operand order, which saves an instruction.

I've tested it with a small number of cases and it seems to match your original implementation.


Algorithm:

 if (mean(a, b) >= 0)       // this can just be reduced to (a + b) >= 0
 {
     minmag = min(a, b);
     maxmag = max(a, b);
 }
 else
 {
     minmag = max(a, b);
     maxmag = min(a, b);
 }
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    That's a clever solution. I wanted to use the min/max instructions but did not think of this. Thanks. I'll give a try and get back to you. – Z boson Jun 3 '15 at 12:29
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    @Zboson: According to Agner Fog's instruction tables, MAXPD on Haswell is port 1, 3 cycles latency. You could shift some work to port 5 by amin = _mm_min_pd(a,b); amax = a^b^amin. – EOF Jun 3 '15 at 12:41
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    You provided a clever alternative to my solution. However, your solution is slower than the two_sum function. Also the bit-wise and instructions I think have a latency of 1 and don't use port 1. Additionally, your solution is a bit less accurate. I think that's because of the addition you do which can "carry" but I'm not sure. Nevertheless, I really appreciate your answer. – Z boson Jun 4 '15 at 7:02
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    @PaulR, I found a quicker solution to my double-double addition using these minmaxmag functions. See my answer stackoverflow.com/questions/30573443/… – Z boson Jun 4 '15 at 12:26
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    I just realized in my definition above I did not define what happens when |a| == |b|. There appear to be different definitions. The one in OpenCL returns max(a,b) or min (a,b) when |a| == |b| another definition returns the first argument. I guess I should ask a question about this. My code does the second case. – Z boson Jun 5 '15 at 8:22

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