3

If you have a filename containing spaces, you typically double quote it on the Windows command shell (cmd.exe).

dir "\Program Files"

This also works for other special characters like ^&;,=. But it doesn't work for percent signs as they may be part of variable substitution. For example,

mkdir "%os%"

will create a directory named Windows_NT. To escape the percent sign, a caret can be used:

mkdir ^%os^%

But unfortunately, the caret sign loses its meaning in double quotes:

mkdir "^%os^%"

creates a directory named ^%os^%.

This is what I found out so far (Windows 7 command shell):

  • The characters ^ and & can be escaped with either a caret or double quotes.
  • The characters ;, ,, =, and space can only be escaped with double quotes.
  • The character % can only be escaped with a caret.
  • The characters '`+-~_.!#$@()[]{} apparently don't have to be escaped in filenames.
  • The characters <>:"/\|?* are illegal in filenames anyway.

This seems to make a general algorithm to quote filenames rather complicated. For example, to create a directory named My favorite %OS%, you have to write:

mkdir "My favorite "^%OS^%

Question 1: Is there an easier way to safely quote space and percent characters?

Question 2: Are the characters '`+-~_.!#$@()[]{} really safe to use without escaping?

  • Hmm. mkdir "My favorite %OS%" works expected ... you don't need to escape the % with ^ – DavidPostill Jun 3 '15 at 13:16
  • @DavidPostill It doesn't work for me on Windows 7. What Windows version do you use? Is the %OS% variable set? What does echo %OS% print? – nwellnhof Jun 3 '15 at 13:24
  • Windows 7, %OS% is set. Output from echo %OS% is Windows_NT – DavidPostill Jun 3 '15 at 13:26
  • @DavidPostill To clarify: I expect a directory named My favorite %OS% without variable substitution. When I run mkdir "My favorite %OS%", I get a directory named My favorite Windows_NT which is not what I want. – nwellnhof Jun 3 '15 at 13:30
  • mkdir "My favorite %%OS%%" works (with the second " at the end where it should be). – DavidPostill Jun 3 '15 at 13:33
6

The characters ^ and & can be escaped with either a caret or double quotes.

There is an additional restriction when piping.

When a pipe is used, the expressions are parsed twice. First when the expression before the pipe is executed and a second time when the expression after the pipe is executed. So to escape any characters in the second expression double escaping is needed:

The line below will echo a single & character:

break| echo ^^^&

The character % can only be escaped with a caret.

% can also be escaped by doubling it.

The % character has a special meaning for command line parameters and FOR parameters.

To treat a percent as a regular character, double it:

%%


For example, to create a directory named My favorite %OS%, you have to write:

mkdir "My favorite "^%OS^%

Question 1: Is there an easier way to safely quote space and percent characters?

Use %% instead of % with the second " at the end where you would normally expect it to be.

C:\test\sub>dir
...

 Directory of C:\test\sub

03/06/2015  14:40    <DIR>          .
03/06/2015  14:40    <DIR>          ..
               0 File(s)              0 bytes
               2 Dir(s)  82,207,772,672 bytes free

C:\test\sub>mkdir "My favorite %%OS%%"

C:\test\sub>dir
...
 Directory of C:\test\sub

03/06/2015  14:40    <DIR>          .
03/06/2015  14:40    <DIR>          ..
03/06/2015  14:40    <DIR>          My favorite %Windows_NT%
               0 File(s)              0 bytes
               3 Dir(s)  82,207,772,672 bytes free

Question 2: Are the characters '`+-~_.!#$@()[]{} really safe to use without escaping?

No, again there are some additional circumstances when some of these must be escaped, for example when using delayed variable expansion or when using for /f.

See Escape Characters for all the details ... in particular the Summary table.


Sources Syntax : Escape Characters, Delimiters and Quotes and Escape Characters.


Further Reading

  • 1
    Thanks for pointing me to this answer. What confused me is that %% can be used to escape % in batch files, but not on the command line. – nwellnhof Feb 7 '16 at 16:55

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