686

I have an external (to the component), observable object that I want to listen for changes on. When the object is updated it emits change events, and then I want to rerender the component when any change is detected.

With a top-level React.render this has been possible, but within a component it doesn't work (which makes some sense since the render method just returns an object).

Here's a code example:

export default class MyComponent extends React.Component {

  handleButtonClick() {
    this.render();
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        {Math.random()}
        <button onClick={this.handleButtonClick.bind(this)}>
          Click me
        </button>
      </div>
    )
  }
}

Clicking the button internally calls this.render(), but that's not what actually causes the rendering to happen (you can see this in action because the text created by {Math.random()} doesn't change). However, if I simply call this.setState() instead of this.render(), it works fine.

So I guess my question is: do React components need to have state in order to rerender? Is there a way to force the component to update on demand without changing the state?

  • 7
    the accepted answer says this.forceUpdate() is the right solution whereas rest of all answers and several comments are against using forceUpdate(). Will that then be fine to say that the question didn't get a proper solution/answer yet? – adi Sep 14 '17 at 12:39
  • 6
    The excepted answer answered my question at the time. Is is technically the answer I was looking for, and I still think the right answer. The other answers I think are good supplemental information for folks with the same question to be aware of. – Philip Walton Sep 17 '17 at 18:36
  • Interesting to note is that you DON'T NEED ANYTHING IN STATE at all other than initializing it to a plain object, then calling this.setState({}) just triggers a new render. React is great but also weird sometimes. Therefore you could directly loop through a stores data when trigger a change without extra plumbing or worry about data per component instance. – Jason Sebring Nov 23 '17 at 18:08
  • On the whole I would say yes. If you are using force update this is for updating components where they may be dependent on changes outside of the state management of your app. I cannot think of a good example of that. Useful to know though. – Daniel Nov 27 '19 at 19:30

19 Answers 19

764

In your component, you can call this.forceUpdate() to force a rerender.

Documentation: https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/component-api.html

| improve this answer | |
  • 168
    Another way is this.setState(this.state); – kar Feb 7 '16 at 8:56
  • 25
    Using forceupdate is discouraged, please see the last answer. – Varand Pezeshkian Apr 4 '16 at 20:33
  • 42
    While this.forceUpdate() isn't a very good solution to the askers' problem, it's the correct answer to the question posed in the title. While it should generally be avoided, there are situations when forceUpdate is a good solution. – ArneHugo May 24 '16 at 19:11
  • 8
    @kar Actually, additional logic can be implemented in shouldComponentUpdate() rendering your solution futile. – Qwerty Jun 2 '16 at 14:03
  • 4
    Maximum call stack size exceeded – IntoTheDeep Aug 24 '16 at 18:39
326

forceUpdate should be avoided because it deviates from a React mindset. The React docs cite an example of when forceUpdate might be used:

By default, when your component's state or props change, your component will re-render. However, if these change implicitly (eg: data deep within an object changes without changing the object itself) or if your render() method depends on some other data, you can tell React that it needs to re-run render() by calling forceUpdate().

However, I'd like to propose the idea that even with deeply nested objects, forceUpdate is unnecessary. By using an immutable data source tracking changes becomes cheap; a change will always result in a new object so we only need to check if the reference to the object has changed. You can use the library Immutable JS to implement immutable data objects into your app.

Normally you should try to avoid all uses of forceUpdate() and only read from this.props and this.state in render(). This makes your component "pure" and your application much simpler and more efficient.forceUpdate()

Changing the key of the element you want re-rendered will work. Set the key prop on your element via state and then when you want to update set state to have a new key.

<Element key={this.state.key} /> 

Then a change occurs and you reset the key

this.setState({ key: Math.random() });

I want to note that this will replace the element that the key is changing on. An example of where this could be useful is when you have a file input field that you would like to reset after an image upload.

While the true answer to the OP's question would be forceUpdate() I have found this solution helpful in different situations. I also want to note that if you find yourself using forceUpdate you may want to review your code and see if there is another way to do things.

NOTE 1-9-2019:

The above (changing the key) will completely replace the element. If you find yourself updating the key to make changes happen you probably have an issue somewhere else in your code. Using Math.random() in key will re-create the element with each render. I would NOT recommend updating the key like this as react uses the key to determine the best way to re-render things.

| improve this answer | |
  • 16
    I'd be interested to know why this got a downvote? I've been banging my head trying to get screen readers to respond to aria alerts and this is the only technique I've found that works reliably. If you have something in your UI that generates the same alert each time it is clicked, by default react doesn't re-render the DOM so the screen reader doesn't announce the change. Setting a unique key makes it work. Maybe the downvote was because it still involves setting state. But forcing a re-render to DOM by setting key is golden! – Martin Bayly Mar 4 '16 at 1:35
  • 2
    I very much liked this answer because - 1: use of forceupdate() is discouraged, and 2: this way is very helpful for 3rd party components which you have installed via npm, meaning not your own components. E.g React-resizable-and-movable is a 3rd party component that I use, but it's not reacting to my component setstate. this is great solution. – Varand Pezeshkian Apr 4 '16 at 20:32
  • 80
    This is a hack and an abuse of key. First, it's intent is unclear. A reader of your code will have to work hard to understand why you are using key this way. Second, this is no more pure than forceUpdate. "Pure" React means that the visual presentation of your component is 100% dependent on its state, so if you change any state, it updates. If however, you have some deeply nested objects (the scenario the forceUpdate docs cite a reason to use it) then using forceUpdate makes that clear. Third, Math.random() is…random. Theoretically, it could generate the same random number. – atomkirk Jul 7 '16 at 13:33
  • 8
    @xtraSimplicity I can't agree that this complies with the React way of doing things. forceUpdate is the React way of doing this. – Rob Grant Feb 25 '17 at 10:17
  • 3
    @Robert Grant, looking back, I agree. The added complexity isn't really worth it. – XtraSimplicity Feb 25 '17 at 10:26
80

Actually, forceUpdate() is the only correct solution as setState() might not trigger a re-render if additional logic is implemented in shouldComponentUpdate() or when it simply returns false.

forceUpdate()

Calling forceUpdate() will cause render() to be called on the component, skipping shouldComponentUpdate(). more...

setState()

setState() will always trigger a re-render unless conditional rendering logic is implemented in shouldComponentUpdate(). more...


forceUpdate() can be called from within your component by this.forceUpdate()


Hooks: How can I force component to re-render with hooks in React?


BTW: Are you mutating state or your nested properties don't propagate?

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    one interesting thing to note is that state assingments outside of setState such as this.state.foo = 'bar' will not trigger the render lifecycle method – lfender6445 Dec 26 '16 at 18:36
  • 4
    @lfender6445 Assigning state directly with this.state outside of the constructor should also throw an error. Might not have done so in 2016; but, I am pretty sure it does it now. – Tyler Jun 29 '18 at 17:27
  • I have added some links to work around direct state assignments. – Qwerty May 20 at 15:23
36

I Avoided forceUpdate by doing following

WRONG WAY : do not use index as key

this.state.rows.map((item, index) =>
   <MyComponent cell={item} key={index} />
)

CORRECT WAY : Use data id as key, it can be some guid etc

this.state.rows.map((item) =>
   <MyComponent item={item} key={item.id} />
)

so by doing such code improvement your component will be UNIQUE and render naturally

| improve this answer | |
  • this.state.rows.map((item) => <MyComponent item={item} key={item.id} /> ) – Tal Aug 26 '18 at 15:21
  • Thank you so much for nudging me into the right direction. Using index as key was indeed my problem. – RoiEX Apr 30 '19 at 8:52
  • To justify my down vote, despite it is a good practice to use this approach, this answer is not related to the question. – micnic Oct 17 '19 at 13:31
34

When you want two React components to communicate, which are not bound by a relationship (parent-child), it is advisable to use Flux or similar architectures.

What you want to do is to listen for changes of the observable component store, which holds the model and its interface, and saving the data that causes the render to change as state in MyComponent. When the store pushes the new data, you change the state of your component, which automatically triggers the render.

Normally you should try to avoid using forceUpdate() . From the documentation:

Normally you should try to avoid all uses of forceUpdate() and only read from this.props and this.state in render(). This makes your application much simpler and more efficient

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    What is the memory status of a component state? If I have five components on a page and they all are listening to a single store, do I have the data five times in memory, or are they references? And don't all of those listeners add up fast? Why is it better to "trickle down" than to just pass data to your target? – AJFarkas Nov 13 '15 at 1:18
  • 5
    Actually the recommendations are to pass the store data to component props and only use the component state for things like scroll state and other minor ui-specific things. If you use redux (I recommend it), you can use the connect function from react-redux to automatically map store state to component props whenever needed based on a mapping function you supply. – Stijn de Witt Jan 31 '16 at 1:54
  • 1
    @AJFarkas the state would be assigned to a store's data which is just a pointer to it anyway so memory is not an issue unless you are cloning. – Jason Sebring May 28 '17 at 14:53
  • 4
    "forceUpdate() should be always avoided" is incorrect. The documentation clearly says: "Normally you should try to avoid all uses of forceUpdate()". There are valid use cases of forceUpdate – AJP Jul 3 '17 at 16:55
  • 2
    @AJP you're absolutely right, that was personal bias speaking :) I have edited the answer. – gcedo Nov 17 '17 at 10:55
18

use hooks or HOC take your pick

Using hooks or the HOC (higher order component) pattern, you can have automatic updates when your stores change. This is a very light-weight approach without a framework.

useStore Hooks way to handle store updates

interface ISimpleStore {
  on: (ev: string, fn: () => void) => void;
  off: (ev: string, fn: () => void) => void;
}

export default function useStore<T extends ISimpleStore>(store: T) {
  const [storeState, setStoreState] = useState({store});
  useEffect(() => {
    const onChange = () => {
      setStoreState({store});
    }
    store.on('change', onChange);
    return () => {
      store.off('change', onChange);
    }
  }, []);
  return storeState.store;
}

withStores HOC handle store updates

export default function (...stores: SimpleStore[]) {
  return function (WrappedComponent: React.ComponentType<any>) {
    return class WithStore extends PureComponent<{}, {lastUpdated: number}> {
      constructor(props: React.ComponentProps<any>) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {
          lastUpdated: Date.now(),
        };
        this.stores = stores;
      }

      private stores?: SimpleStore[];

      private onChange = () => {
        this.setState({lastUpdated: Date.now()});
      };

      componentDidMount = () => {
        this.stores &&
          this.stores.forEach((store) => {
            // each store has a common change event to subscribe to
            store.on('change', this.onChange);
          });
      };

      componentWillUnmount = () => {
        this.stores &&
          this.stores.forEach((store) => {
            store.off('change', this.onChange);
          });
      };

      render() {
        return (
          <WrappedComponent
            lastUpdated={this.state.lastUpdated}
            {...this.props}
          />
        );
      }
    };
  };
}

SimpleStore class

import AsyncStorage from '@react-native-community/async-storage';
import ee, {Emitter} from 'event-emitter';

interface SimpleStoreArgs {
  key?: string;
  defaultState?: {[key: string]: any};
}

export default class SimpleStore {
  constructor({key, defaultState}: SimpleStoreArgs) {
    if (key) {
      this.key = key;
      // hydrate here if you want w/ localState or AsyncStorage
    }
    if (defaultState) {
      this._state = {...defaultState, loaded: false};
    } else {
      this._state = {loaded: true};
    }
  }
  protected key: string = '';
  protected _state: {[key: string]: any} = {};
  protected eventEmitter: Emitter = ee({});
  public setState(newState: {[key: string]: any}) {
    this._state = {...this._state, ...newState};
    this.eventEmitter.emit('change');
    if (this.key) {
      // store on client w/ localState or AsyncStorage
    }
  }
  public get state() {
    return this._state;
  }
  public on(ev: string, fn:() => void) {
    this.eventEmitter.on(ev, fn);
  }
  public off(ev: string, fn:() => void) {
    this.eventEmitter.off(ev, fn);
  }
  public get loaded(): boolean {
    return !!this._state.loaded;
  }
}

How to Use

In the case of hooks:

// use inside function like so
const someState = useStore(myStore);
someState.myProp = 'something';

In the case of HOC:

// inside your code get/set your store and stuff just updates
const val = myStore.myProp;
myOtherStore.myProp = 'something';
// return your wrapped component like so
export default withStores(myStore)(MyComponent);

MAKE SURE To export your stores as a singleton to get the benefit of global change like so:

class MyStore extends SimpleStore {
  public get someProp() {
    return this._state.someProp || '';
  }
  public set someProp(value: string) {
    this.setState({...this._state, someProp: value});
  }
}
// this is a singleton
const myStore = new MyStore();
export {myStore};

This approach is pretty simple and works for me. I also work in large teams and use Redux and MobX and find those to be good as well but just a lot of boilerplate. I just personally like my own approach because I always hated a lot of code for something that can be simple when you need it to be.

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  • 2
    I think there is a typo in your Store class example in the update method having to write the first line of the method as following: this._data = {...this._data, ...newData}. – Norbert Dec 12 '18 at 11:09
  • 2
    React discourages inheritance in favor of composition. reactjs.org/docs/composition-vs-inheritance.html – Fred Feb 8 '19 at 13:57
  • 1
    Just wondering about clarity/readibility, how coud this.setState(this.state) be better than this.forceUpdate()? – Zoman Feb 13 '19 at 22:56
17

So I guess my question is: do React components need to have state in order to rerender? Is there a way to force the component to update on demand without changing the state?

The other answers have tried to illustrate how you could, but the point is that you shouldn't. Even the hacky solution of changing the key misses the point. The power of React is giving up control of manually managing when something should render, and instead just concerning yourself with how something should map on inputs. Then supply stream of inputs.

If you need to manually force re-render, you're almost certainly not doing something right.

| improve this answer | |
  • @art-solopov, what problem are you referring to? Which docs present them? And assuming you're referring to nested objects in state, the answer is to use a different structure for storing your state. That's clearly a sub-optimal way of handling state in React. You also shouldn't manage state separately. You're losing one of the largest benefits of React if you don't work with the state-management system. Managing updates manually is an anti-pattern. – Kyle Baker Jan 18 '17 at 21:25
  • Please, can you check this question stackoverflow.com/questions/61277292/…? – HuLu ViCa Apr 17 at 17:28
4

You could do it a couple of ways:

1. Use the forceUpdate() method:

There are some glitches that may happen when using the forceUpdate() method. One example is that it ignores the shouldComponentUpdate() method and will re-render the view regardless of whether shouldComponentUpdate() returns false. Because of this using forceUpdate() should be avoided when at all possible.

2. Passing this.state to the setState() method

The following line of code overcomes the problem with the previous example:

this.setState(this.state);

Really all this is doing is overwriting the current state with the current state which triggers a re-rendering. This still isn't necessarily the best way to do things, but it does overcome some of the glitches you might encounter using the forceUpdate() method.

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  • 2
    Since setState is batched it's probably safer to do: this.setState(prevState => prevState); – Mark Galloway Sep 14 '17 at 19:15
  • 1
    Not really sure why that is a 'glitch'. The name of the method ('forceUpdate') could not be clearer: force the update always. – Zoman Feb 13 '19 at 23:02
4

There are a few ways to rerender your component:

The simplest solution is to use forceUpdate() method:

this.forceUpdate()

One more solution is to create not used key in the state(nonUsedKey) and call setState function with update of this nonUsedKey:

this.setState({ nonUsedKey: Date.now() } );

Or rewrite all current state:

this.setState(this.state);

Props changing also provides component rerender.

| improve this answer | |
3

For completeness, you can also achieve this in functional components:

const [, updateState] = useState();
const forceUpdate = useCallback(() => updateState({}), []);
// ...
forceUpdate();

Or, as a reusable hook:

const useForceUpdate = () => {
  const [, updateState] = useState();
  return useCallback(() => updateState({}), []);
}
// const forceUpdate = useForceUpdate();

See: https://stackoverflow.com/a/53215514/2692307

Please note that using a force-update mechanism is still bad practice as it goes against the react mentality, so it should still be avoided if possible.

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2

We can use this.forceUpdate() as below.

       class MyComponent extends React.Component {



      handleButtonClick = ()=>{
          this.forceUpdate();
     }


 render() {

   return (
     <div>
      {Math.random()}
        <button  onClick={this.handleButtonClick}>
        Click me
        </button>
     </div>
    )
  }
}

 ReactDOM.render(<MyComponent /> , mountNode);

The Element 'Math.random' part in the DOM only gets updated even if you use the setState to re-render the component.

All the answers here are correct supplementing the question for understanding..as we know to re-render a component with out using setState({}) is by using the forceUpdate().

The above code runs with setState as below.

 class MyComponent extends React.Component {



             handleButtonClick = ()=>{
                this.setState({ });
              }


        render() {
         return (
  <div>
    {Math.random()}
    <button  onClick={this.handleButtonClick}>
      Click me
    </button>
  </div>
)
  }
 }

ReactDOM.render(<MyComponent /> , mountNode);
| improve this answer | |
1

Just another reply to back-up the accepted answer :-)

React discourages the use of forceUpdate() because they generally have a very "this is the only way of doing it" approach toward functional programming. This is fine in many cases, but many React developers come with an OO-background, and with that approach, it's perfectly OK to listen to an observable object.

And if you do, you probably know you MUST re-render when the observable "fires", and as so, you SHOULD use forceUpdate() and it's actually a plus that shouldComponentUpdate() is NOT involved here.

Tools like MobX, that takes an OO-approach, is actually doing this underneath the surface (actually MobX calls render() directly)

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0

I have found it best to avoid forceUpdate(). One way to force re-render is to add dependency of render() on a temporary external variable and change the value of that variable as and when needed.

Here's a code example:

class Example extends Component{
   constructor(props){
      this.state = {temp:0};

      this.forceChange = this.forceChange.bind(this);
   }

   forceChange(){
      this.setState(prevState => ({
          temp: prevState.temp++
      })); 
   }

   render(){
      return(
         <div>{this.state.temp &&
             <div>
                  ... add code here ...
             </div>}
         </div>
      )
   }
}

Call this.forceChange() when you need to force re-render.

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0

ES6 - I am including an example, which was helpful for me:

In a "short if statement" you can pass empty function like this:

isReady ? ()=>{} : onClick

This seems to be the shortest approach.

()=>{}
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0

forceUpdate(); method will work but it is advisable to use setState();

| improve this answer | |
0

In order to accomplish what you are describing please try this.forceUpdate().

| improve this answer | |
  • What does this action do? – Dominique Sep 18 '18 at 14:22
0

Another way is calling setState, AND preserve state:

this.setState(prevState=>({...prevState}));

| improve this answer | |
0

forceUpdate(), but every time I've ever heard someone talk about it, it's been followed up with you should never use this.

| improve this answer | |
-1

You can use forceUpdate() for more details check (forceUpdate()).

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  • 1
    Out of curiosity, why leave this answer if for 4 years people have already offered that as a possible solution in this thread? – Byron Coetsee Apr 17 at 18:45

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