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I have a spring-boot app using that uses spring-mvc with html. No Thymeleaf, no JSP. I would like to be able to apply themes to my app, much the way CMS's such as Joomla and Wordpress do. The problem is that every Spring-MVC Template article/posting talks about either using a single css file, or using something like Tiles. If I have 15 themes, each in their own folder (they typically seem to have many css, js, and html files), I am not sure how I can apply that theme to my app dynamically (selecting via drop down for example).

Has anyone done anything like this? Conceptually I don't see the problem, but short of manually moving each template related file under /template, I don't know how to best accomplish this.

  • I know how to do it with Velocity as view resolver. Want me to post it as answer? – renanleandrof Jun 3 '15 at 18:49
  • would that work if I am not using Velocity for my page views? If so, I would love to see it. – sonoerin Jun 3 '15 at 18:54
  • I don't think so. I never used spring without any view resolver. But i will post it, so you can have an idea. – renanleandrof Jun 3 '15 at 19:00
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Using Velocity as viewResolver is possible to do it.

I'm using this configuration:

<bean id="velocityConfig" class="org.springframework.web.servlet.view.velocity.VelocityConfigurer">
        <property name="resourceLoaderPath" value="/WEB-INF/views/"/>
        <property name="velocityProperties">
            <props>
                <prop key="input.encoding">UTF-8</prop>
                <prop key="output.encoding">UTF-8</prop>
            </props>
        </property>
    </bean>
    <!-- #Velocity -->
    <bean id="viewResolver" class="org.springframework.web.servlet.view.velocity.VelocityLayoutViewResolver">
        <property name="cache" value="true" />
        <property name="prefix" value="" />
        <property name="suffix" value=".vm" />
        <property name="layoutUrl" value="layout1.vm" />
        <property name="contentType" value="text/html;charset=UTF-8" />
    </bean>

The property layoutUrl there is your DEFAULT template, that is a HTML file inside your webapp/WEB-INF/views/ folder:

layout1.vm:

<html>
<body>
<h1>Hello world 1!</h1>

$screen_content

</body>
</html>

The velocity View Resolver will replace $screen_content with the view contents of your controller response:

MyController.java

...

@RequestMapping("/mycontroller")
public String myController() {
    return "myView1";
}
...

So, if the view myView1.vm inside webapp/WEB-INF/views/ is something like:

<h2> Foo Bar! </h2>

The result of a request to /myApp/mycontroller would be like:

<html>
    <body>
    <h1>Hello world 1!</h1>

    <h2> Foo Bar! </h2>

    </body>
    </html>

And if you want to use another TEMPLATE, you can set it dynamically on your controller, setting the value on your Model var:

...

@RequestMapping("/mycontrollerWithADifferentLayout")
public String myController2(Model m) {
    m.addAttribute("layout", "layout2");
    return "myView1";
}
...

When setting "layout" attribute on model, Velocity will use the provided view as the template.

  • Thank you for the help, I am going to see if I can make this work with my HTML. Hopefully this solves my problem without requiring a large rewrite – sonoerin Jun 3 '15 at 19:35
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Found this on Spring Reference:

17.9.2 Defining themes

To use themes in your web application, you must set up an implementation of the org.springframework.ui.context.ThemeSource interface. The WebApplicationContext interface extends ThemeSource but delegates its responsibilities to a dedicated implementation. By default the delegate will be an org.springframework.ui.context.support.ResourceBundleThemeSource implementation that loads properties files from the root of the classpath. To use a custom ThemeSource implementation or to configure the base name prefix of the ResourceBundleThemeSource, you can register a bean in the application context with the reserved name themeSource. The web application context automatically detects a bean with that name and uses it.

When using the ResourceBundleThemeSource, a theme is defined in a simple properties file. The properties file lists the resources that make up the theme. Here is an example:

styleSheet=/themes/cool/style.css background=/themes/cool/img/coolBg.jpg The keys of the properties are the names that refer to the themed elements from view code. For a JSP, you typically do this using the spring:theme custom tag, which is very similar to the spring:message tag. The following JSP fragment uses the theme defined in the previous example to customize the look and feel:

<%@ taglib prefix="spring" uri="http://www.springframework.org/tags"%>
 <html>
     <head>
         <link rel="stylesheet" href="<spring:theme code='styleSheet'/>" type="text/css"/>
     </head>
     <body style="background=<spring:theme code='background'/>">
         ...
     </body> </html>

By default, the ResourceBundleThemeSource uses an empty base name prefix. As a > result, the properties files are loaded from the root of the classpath. Thus you would put the cool.properties theme definition in a directory at the root of the classpath, for example, in /WEB-INF/classes. The ResourceBundleThemeSource uses the standard Java resource bundle loading mechanism, allowing for full internationalization of themes. For example, we could have a /WEB-INF/classes/cool_nl.properties that references a special background image with Dutch text on it.

http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/4.1.x/spring-framework-reference/html/mvc.html#mvc-themeresolver-defining

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