31

HTML:

<div class="form-group" 
     ng-class="{ 'has-error' : form.firstName.$invalid && form.firstName.$touched }">
  <label for="firstName" 
         class="control-label">
         First Name
  </label>
  <input type="text" 
         name="firstName" 
         id="firstName" 
         ng-model="editableUser.firstName" 
         class="form-control" 
         required>
  <span class="help-block" 
        ng-show="form.firstName.$error.required && form.firstName.$touched">
        First Name is required
  </span>
</div>

<input type="submit" 
       ng-click="submit()" 
       value="Submit" 
       class="btn btn-default">

I'm trying to get my the 'has-error' class to kick in for invalid fields when a user clicks submit.

I would think you could do something like this:

$scope.submit = function () {
  if ($scope.form.$invalid) {
    angular.forEach($scope.form.$invalid, function(field) {
      field.$setTouched();
    });
    alert("Form is invalid.");
  }
};

But there is no $setTouched method in https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/type/form.FormController

EDIT: Realize $setTouched does exist, it's in https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/type/ngModel.NgModelController

  • What does one of your form fields look like? Could you edit your question to include an example? I'm interested why you are checking for $touched as well? – Ben Heymink Jun 3 '15 at 19:16
  • what if you use setDirty instead? – Mark Pieszak - Trilon.io Jun 3 '15 at 19:18
  • @BenHeymink Added code to clarify. – Derek Jun 3 '15 at 19:20
50
if ($scope.form.$invalid) {
    angular.forEach($scope.form.$error, function (field) {
        angular.forEach(field, function(errorField){
            errorField.$setTouched();
        })
    });
    alert("Form is invalid.");
}

plunker: http://plnkr.co/edit/XmvoTkIQ0yvFukrVSz11

16

Try the recently added $submitted

<input type="text" 
     name="firstName" 
     id="firstName" 
     ng-model="editableUser.firstName" 
     class="form-control" 
     required>
   <span class="help-block" 
    ng-show="form.firstName.$error.required && (form.firstName.$touched || form.$submitted">
    First Name is required

  • 6
    In addition - if your function is triggered by an anchor element rather than an input of type submit - you might want to add $scope.myForm.$setSubmitted(); to your function. – mono68 Feb 19 '16 at 17:03
  • I like this solution the best - no need for extra controller logic if you can just use the built-in logic instead! – Tom Spencer May 24 '16 at 19:57
  • Thanks for a great tip about $submitted property! In my case works fine the following - "fullname.invalid && (fullname.touched || form.submitted)" – simonbor May 4 '17 at 20:21
  • this is better than the accepted answer IMHO – Abdo Adel Jun 3 '17 at 16:03
7

Extending on Alexey's answer, you can add new method to FormController that will do the same, so there's no need to copy code from one submit function to another:

// config.js
export default function config($provide) {
    $provide.decorator('formDirective', $delegate => {
        const fn = $delegate[0].controller.prototype
        if (!('$setTouched' in fn)) fn.$setTouched = function() {
            if (this.$invalid) {
                Object.values(this.$error).forEach(controls => {
                    controls.forEach(control => control.$setTouched())
                })
            }
        }
        return $delegate
    })
}
// controller.js
$scope.submit = function () {
    if ($scope.form.$invalid) {
        $scope.form.$setTouched();
        alert("Form is invalid.");
    }
};

In case someone wonders why would anyone want to do this kind of validation: iOS constraint validation is lacking, so ng-submit gets called even on invalid forms.

1

The above answers did not work for me.. to programatically set Touched true.

example, even after executing this $scope.frmUser["U_Name"].$setTouched(); $scope.frmUser["U_Name"].$invalid always stayed true.

And submit button was to be enabled only if $scope.frmUser.$invalid is false

Instead taking scope variable for each of fields to be set from programatically from javascript and setting it true / false worked fine.

0

If you fancy uisng ES6 + lodash fp

import forEach from 'lodash/fp/forEach'

    validate()
    {
        forEach(forEach(field => field.$setTouched()))(this.form.$error)
    }

<form name="$ctrl.form">...</form>
-4

I'm not sure why you think you have to 'touch' the fields, just use regular form validation; you simply need to wrap your fields in an actual form element, then let angular take care of the validation for you. Here is a working example..

You really don't need to check for $touched, or even set it (unless there is a specific reason why you need to do this?) - just use the required attribute on the input fields if they are required fields:

<input name="namefield" "text" ng-model="user.firstName" required/>
  • 1
    Because sometimes you only want error styles to apply and messages to appear after the user tried to submit the form for the first time. I think this is what most people are used to. jQuery Validate behaves like that as well. I didn't vote you down btw. – mono68 Feb 19 '16 at 17:35
  • Fair enough. Seems a bit of an anti-pattern to allow the user to perform an action you know will fail (Allowing them to hit submit when you have client-side validation), but each to their own :) – Ben Heymink Feb 22 '16 at 15:15
  • 2
    For instance a form with input type email would distract you with error messages until the address you enter is well-formed. The user should have the chance to complete the form without an error if his input is valid in the end. – mono68 Mar 1 '16 at 14:43

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