18

I know this is very silly question, but I am struggling to find this logic. I am trying to work on this very basic for loop to achieve this result

0 - 0
0 - 1
0 - 2
0 - 3
0 - 4
0 - 5
0 - 6
0 - 7
0 - 8
0 - 9
0 - 10
0 - 11

1 - 12
1 - 13
1 - 14
1 - 15
1 - 16
1 - 17
1 - 18
1 - 19
1 - 20
1 - 21
1 - 22
1 - 23

2 - 24
2 - 25
2 - 26
2 - 27
2 - 28
2 - 29
2 - 30
2 - 31
2 - 32
2 - 33
2 - 34
2 - 35

The inner loop should continue from the number where the first inner loop was cut done. in the first iteration it left off at 11, the second time it comes to the inner loop it should go from 12 - 24 and so forth.

var count = 0;
var val = 0;
for(i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    for(j = 0; j < count + 12; j++) {
        console.log(i + " - " + j);       

    }
    val = j;
    count = count + j;
    console.log(count);
}
  • 4
    You are starting j at zero each time. – epascarello Jun 3 '15 at 20:48
  • 2
    i = floor(j / 12) – Timothy Shields Jun 3 '15 at 20:49
65

There are several "clever" answers here. I'd stick with a "simple to read and simple to debug" answer. Here's a solution in C# that should be simple enough to translate:

int k = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < 12; j++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i + " - " + k++);
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}

Organizational Skills Beat Algorithmic Wizardry

56

You don't need 2 loops, you can achieve this with a single loop:

for (var i = 0; i < 36; i++){
  console.log(Math.floor(i/12) + " - " + i);  
}

If you don't like Math.floor, you can use the double bitwise not operator to truncate the float:

for (var i = 0; i < 36; i++){
  console.log(~~(i/12) + " - " + i);  
}
  • 1
    Math.floor is unneeded here – Sarge Borsch Jun 4 '15 at 8:21
  • 34
    I fail to see how this implementation is better than using two loops - the number of basic operations is the same except now you have a computationally intensive division rather than simple addition. – Rob Farr Jun 4 '15 at 8:59
  • 2
    I mean if you really wanted to be efficient you could unroll the loop and reduce instead of increment, but the point was that it can be done in a single line with a single loop, not to be efficient. – WakeskaterX Jun 4 '15 at 12:04
  • But you're right I would not use this in a node js application that needs to be optimized as much as possible. – WakeskaterX Jun 4 '15 at 13:22
  • 3
    @RobFarr It's arguably better because it's easier to understand and reason about than a two loop solution with counter (unless performance matters). – mucaho Jun 4 '15 at 18:01
28
+500

One loop

You don't need two loops because you can use some simple math.

Use the modulo operator (%) to find the remainder of i divided by 12, if there is no remainder, increment n, otherwise continue.

As 0 is technically a multiple of twelve, (0 is a multiple of everything) you need to start n at minus one.

function demo(n, i) { document.body.innerHTML += n + ' ' + i + '<br>'; }

var x = 12, y = 3, l = (x * y), n =-1; 
for(var i = 0; i < l; ++i) {
    if(i % x === 0) ++n;
    demo(n, i);
}

You can wrap it in a function definition to aid in reuse:

function demo(n, i) { document.body.innerHTML += n + ' ' + i + '<br>'; }

function loopMultiples(l, x, callback) {
    var n =-1
    for(var i = 0; i < l; ++i) {
        if(i % x === 0) ++n;
        callback(n, i);
    }
}
loopMultiples((12*3),12, demo);

The importance of algorithmic wizardry ;)

Two loops

If you want to use two loops, for whatever reason, it should look something like this:

function demo(i, n) { document.body.innerHTML += i + ' ' + n + '<br>'; }

var n = 0, x = 12, y = 3;
for(var i = 0; i < y; ++i) {
    for(var j = 0; j < x; ++j) {
        demo(i, n++); 
    }
}


The following is a response to the comment below. I can't think of a reason to use either of the following methods in normal production code (unless you're trying to confuse someone), but they do return the expected result.

Three loops

function demo(i, n) { document.body.innerHTML += i + ' ' + n + '<br>'; }

var n = 0, x = 6, y = 3, z = 2;
for(var i = 0; i < y; ++i) {
    for(var j = 0; j < z; ++j) {
        for(var k = 0; k < x; ++k) {
            demo(i, n++); 
        }
    }
}

Four!

function demo(i, n) { document.body.innerHTML += i + ' ' + n + '<br>'; }

var n = 0, w = 2, x = 3, y = 3, z = 2;
for(var i = 0; i < y; ++i) {
    for(var j = 0; j < z; ++j) {
        for(var k = 0; k < z; ++k) {
            for(var l = 0; l < x; ++l) {
                demo(i, n++); 
            }
        }
    }
}

  • 10
    one loop, two loops, three loops, four! – Jared Burrows Jun 4 '15 at 5:46
8

This uses two loop statements, but, honestly, is still uses the same number of loops overall, no matter how you split it out (i.e., two loops, looping 3 and 12 times each or one loop looping 36 times . . . 36 loops either way).

It's also takes parameters, to support different counts:

function doubleLoop(outerCount, innerCount) {
    for (i = 0; i < outerCount; i++) {
        var currentOffset = (i * innerCount);

        for (j = 0; j < innerCount; j++) {
            console.log(i + " - " + (currentOffset + j));
        }
    }
}

Then just call it with whatever "count" numbers that you need:

doubleLoop(3, 12);  //this would get you what you asked for in your question
5

Not near as clever as the first approach:

var majorCount = 3;
var minorCount = 12;
var counter = 0;

for(var i = 0; i < majorCount; i++) {
  for (var x = counter; x < counter + minorCount; x++) {
    console.log(i + " - " + x);
  }
  counter += minorCount;
}
  • The are basically the same, with x == k == counter+j. You still use two "repeat N times " loops. – Michel Billaud Jun 4 '15 at 6:18
2

If you dont want use two loop and think math.floor is too expensive.

http://jsfiddle.net/rdh5mv59/

var firstID = 0;
var RangeSize = 12;
for (i = 0; i < 36; i++) {
    if (i >= RangeSize * (firstID + 1)) {
        firstID++;
    }
    console.log(firstID + " - " + i);
}

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