I have a custom interface I've been using for some time that looks something like this:

public interface Function<T, R> {
    R call(T input);
}

I'd like to retrofit this interface with both Java's Function as well as Guava's Function, while keeping it a FunctionalInterface. I thought I had the perfect arrangement:

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Function<T, R> extends
        java.util.function.Function<T, R>,
        com.google.common.base.Function<T, R> {

    R call(T input);

    @Override
    default R apply(T input) {
        return call(input);
    }
}

Both superinterfaces declare the same apply() method, which has been implemented in my interface, leaving only the abstract call() method. Strangely, it won't compile, telling me

Invalid '@FunctionalInterface' annotation; Function<T,R> is not a functional interface

Stranger still, the following variations compile just fine:

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Function<T, R> extends
        java.util.function.Function<T, R> {

    R call(T input);

    @Override
    default R apply(T input) {
        return call(input);
    }
}

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Function<T, R> extends
        com.google.common.base.Function<T, R> {

    R call(T input);

    @Override
    default R apply(T input) {
        return call(input);
    }
}

public interface Function<T, R> extends
        java.util.function.Function<T, R>,
        com.google.common.base.Function<T, R> {

    R call(T input);

    @Override
    default R apply(T input) {
        return call(input);
    }
}

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Function<T, R> extends
        java.util.function.Function<T, R>,
        com.google.common.base.Function<T, R> {

    @Override
    R apply(T input);
}

Is there a reason the first version won't compile?

  • 1
    Your third one compiles because you haven't added the constraint that it must be a @FunctionalInterface (that's an annotation validated by the compiler). – Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 4 '15 at 3:42
  • 1
    @SotiriosDelimanolis, obviously. – shmosel Jun 4 '15 at 3:42
  • 6
    Are you compiling with Eclipse? Compiles fine with Oracle's compiler. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 4 '15 at 3:50
  • 1
    This should compile and does compile with javac. Looks like an eclipse bug.... Also I'm not sure why you want to do that - the main point of functional interfaces is to create lambdas and the name of the method does not matter. So this lambda a -> doSomething(a) can be assigned to any of the 3 Functions interfaces... – assylias Jun 4 '15 at 5:46
  • 1
    @assylias, say I have a method that accepts my Function and I want to refactor it to accept any Java Function. Or say I have an instance of my Function that I want to be able to pass to a Guava method. – shmosel Jun 4 '15 at 6:32
up vote 10 down vote accepted

As stated in the comments, it compiles fine with the oracle compiler. It is an eclipse bug.

Awaiting for a bug fix, personally i will remove the annotation @FunctionalInterface (your 3rd variation):

public interface Function<T, R>
                                extends
                                    java.util.function.Function<T, R>,
                                    com.google.common.base.Function<T, R> {

    R call(T input);

    @Override
    default R apply(T input) {
        return call(input);
    }
}

The major inconvenient of this solution is that the eclipse compiler bug prevent from using the Function as a lambda target type.


If you really want to keep @FunctionalInterface on your Function, a (ugly) workaround might be to introduce an intermediate interface:

public interface AdapterFunction<T, R>
                                      extends
                                          java.util.function.Function<T, R>,
                                          com.google.common.base.Function<T, R> {
    @Override
    default R apply(T input) {
        return null;
    }
}

and let your Function extends this AdapterFunction:

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Function<T, R>
                                extends
                                    AdapterFunction<T, R> {

    R call(T input);

    @Override
    default R apply(T input) {
        return call(input);
    }
}

In this case, the Function is a valid target type for eclipse too:

Function<String, Object> function = st -> st.toString();
  • 1
    Yes, I found a similar bug report here. I don't care about the annotation itself; the problem is that it won't let me use lambda expressions. I tried something similar your adapter idea, with no success. I'll try again tomorrow. – shmosel Jun 4 '15 at 7:44
  • 1
    The solution with the AdapterFunction works in eclipse too. But removing the @FunctionalInterface (3rd variation) don't – gontard Jun 4 '15 at 7:52
  • You're right, it works implement apply() in the adapter. Thanks! – shmosel Jun 4 '15 at 8:06
  • 1
    "The major inconvenient of this solution is that you couldn't use the Function as a lambda target type" => Why not? You don't need an interface to be marked as @FunctionalInterface ot be used as a target type for a lambda, as long as it effectively is a functional interface... – assylias Jun 4 '15 at 9:07
  • 1
    @assylias you are theoretically right but in practice the eclipse compiler does not accept it. It works only with the oracle compiler – gontard Jun 4 '15 at 9:24

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