55

I have a public static class and I am trying to access appSettings from my app.config file in C# and I get the error described in the title.

public static class employee
{
    NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    
}

How do I get this to work?

7
  • 4
    make NameValueCollection static.. Jun 17, 2010 at 16:14
  • 7
    Do you understand what static means? From your question, I don't think you do. You should perhaps re-familiarize yourself with it's definition, especially with regards to c# classes. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/98f28cdx(VS.71).aspx
    – i_am_jorf
    Jun 17, 2010 at 16:15
  • 6
    This has got to be my first time seeing a static employee class.
    – BoltClock
    Jun 17, 2010 at 16:16
  • 1
    @BoltClock has a very good point; are you sure you want your employee class to be static? You almost certainly don't want that behaviour. You'd probably be better off removing the static constraint from the class and the members. Jun 17, 2010 at 16:18
  • 13
    maybe it's a one man band?
    – Pharabus
    Jun 17, 2010 at 16:19

7 Answers 7

106

If the class is declared static, all of the members must be static too.

static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;

Are you sure you want your employee class to be static? You almost certainly don't want that behaviour. You'd probably be better off removing the static constraint from the class and the members.

4
  • 2
    is there any reason why we have to explicitly declare static class members as static .. if they have to be static why isn't each member assumed to be static, saves precious typing time.
    – Sherlock
    Mar 18, 2013 at 20:29
  • 3
    good question @Sherlock, to (approximately) quote Eric Lippert; it's probably because someone would have had to have prioritized and implemented that behaviour... :) Mar 18, 2013 at 21:14
  • 2
    more probably because if you take a look at JUST the member, there is a fair chance you will be puzzled for a long time why your members behaviour is like a static member, but it is not declared statis. Forcing us to type "static" saves a future contributor some trouble.
    – Hacky
    Oct 29, 2016 at 23:36
  • Piling on, since this is C, it's designed to require things to be explicit rather than implicit. Jan 22, 2020 at 20:34
7

It says what it means:

make your class non-static:

public class employee
{
  NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    
}

or the member static:

public static class employee
{
  static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    
}
2
  • 6
    "It says what it means" is not helpful, especially for people new to this language. Nowhere in the error message does it explain WHY an instance member can't be declared in a static class. It simply says it cannot be done with no suggestions on how to solve the error.
    – dsanchez
    Jul 5, 2019 at 14:42
  • Beside the first sentence "it says what it means" there are two solutions for the OPs problem in my answer. And why it is this way is not clear - see the comments below the accepted answer.
    – tanascius
    Jul 8, 2019 at 9:09
7

It is not legal to declare an instance member in a static class. Static class's cannot be instantiated hence it makes no sense to have an instance members (they'd never be accessible).

4

I know this post is old but...

I was able to do this, my problem was that I forgot to make my property static.

public static class MyStaticClass
{
    private static NonStaticObject _myObject = new NonStaticObject();

    //property
    public static NonStaticObject MyObject
    {
        get { return _myObject; }
        set { _myObject = value; }
    }
}
1

Have you tried using the 'static' storage class similar to?:

public static class employee
{
    static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    
}
1

As John Weldon said all members must be static in a static class. Try

public static class employee
{
     static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    

}
1
public static class Employee
{
    public static string SomeSetting
    {
        get 
        {
            return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeSetting"];    
        }
    }
}

Declare the property as static, as well. Also, Don't bother storing a private reference to ConfigurationManager.AppSettings. ConfigurationManager is already a static class.

If you feel that you must store a reference to appsettings, try

public static class Employee
{
    private static NameValueCollection _appSettings=ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;

    public static NameValueCollection AppSettings { get { return _appSettings; } }

}

It's good form to always give an explicit access specifier (private, public, etc) even though the default is private.

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