10

I'm trying to generate a schema for some type from an assembly with xsd.exe

Here is the command line:

xsd.exe TestAssemby.dll /t:TestType

Here is the error I got:

Error: There was an error processing 'TestAssemby.dll'. Unable to load one or more of the requested types. Retrieve the LoaderExceptions property for more information

I copied the referenced DLL file into a folder where it is located according to this.

But still I get the same error.

  • What can be the possible reasons for such an error?
  • How should the LoaderExceptions property be used? (An example will be very helpful.)

5 Answers 5

3

I like to extend user74754's answer. This is how to find out what goes wrong with xsd.exe.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var rgs = new string[]
    {
        @"{path_to_dll}",
        "/type:{type_name}"
    };

    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += (s, e) =>
    {
        string error = e.Exception.ToString();

        var typeLoadException = e.Exception as ReflectionTypeLoadException;

        if (typeLoadException != null)
        {
            foreach (var exception in typeLoadException.LoaderExceptions)
            {
                error += Environment.NewLine + Environment.NewLine +
                         exception.ToString();
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine(error);
    };

    XsdTool.Xsd.Main(rgs);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

So the trick is to run XSD.exe as part of your own test application and register an AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException before you call XsdTool.Xsd.

1
  • This did it for me. I got an error saying that a Swagger method could not be found (IOperationFilter.Apply), even though it was explicitly implemented. So I commented the whole class out and it worked. I uncommented it after generating the schema in order to get back Swagger, of course. Commented May 27, 2016 at 10:53
3

I have fought and fought and fought with this problem and have not been able to successfully get xsd.exe to generate a schema from a class within a DLL file, from the command line, on my machine.

Ultimately I spun up a Windows XP VM to run xsd.exe, which worked fine, but it is probably not a satisfactory answer.

For whatever reason, when I create a new console (or probably any other type of) application in Visual Studio, I am able to add a reference to xsd.exe and reference it programmatically just fine, such as here:

namespace XsdExeTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var rgs = new string[]
                          {
                              @"C:\publish\bin\SoAndSo.Library.dll",
                              "/type:SoAndSoNamespace.SoAndSoClassName"
                          };

            XsdTool.Xsd.Main(rgs);
        }
    }
}

. . . and I get the output:

writing file schema0.xsd

It is a bit of a strange workaround, but it is far easier than spinning up a VM if you don't already have one handy.

I'm guessing that not everyone has this problem, based on the shortage of help information that I found online.

2

For myself, the answer in the end was pretty straightforward: I was missing dependent assemblies in the same folder. xsd.exe has to be able to load all dependent classes, etc. in order to build the XSD.

As a test to see if this is the case in your situation, you could create a new project in Visual Studio (or IDE of choice), and reference the assembly of the class you're generating an XSD for. Be sure to reference the specific library file that xsd.exe is using. If your newly created project can use it and see the class, then the dependencies are good and you can rule that out at least.

2

Instead of copying your DLL file to a different location, run xsd.exe from within your built output folder.

  1. Start a developer command prompt.
  2. Change to your output folder "cd c:\myproject\bin"
  3. Run xsd.exe "xsd myproject.dll /t:MyClass"
2

If your xsd.exe bails out with a type load exception for an existing project (part of your solution), you can run a debug session without writing any code to catch the exception and to inspect it.

Configure your debug session in this way: in the Project Properties of your project, on the Debug page, select Start external program.

Input the full path to the xsd.exe file, e.g.:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v10.0A\bin\NETFX 4.7 Tools\x64\xsd.exe

In the Start options, specify the required command line arguments:

YourAssembly.dll /t:Your.Type

Go to the Exception Settings (menu DebugWindowsException Settings) and activate the System.Reflection.ReflectionTypeLoadException exception. You can indeed activate all CLR exceptions if you wish.

Now, press F5 to start the debug session.

The XSD console window should appear. Then, Visual Studio should break the process and show you the Exception Thrown popup. Here, you can inspect the type load exception.

You should also see the exception in the Locals window.

Actually, this should work for any assembly too. You just need a solution and a project to start a debugging session for. This can be even an empty solution/project.

2
  • Even though this didn't work for me, I like this answer because it promised a solution that basically involves just one small additional entry in the project's launchSettings.json file. My project is .NET Core, and I get a message from VS saying "The target process exited without raising a CoreCLR started event. Ensure that the target process is configured to use .NET Core. This may be expected if the target process did not run on .NET Core." Since xsd.exe is a .NET Framework assembly, this approach doesn't seem to work for .NET Core assemblies.
    – William
    Commented Oct 6, 2020 at 18:22
  • Against my better judgement, I attempted this with a .NET Standard 2.1 project, but got The target process exited without raising a CoreCLR started event. Ensure that the target process is configured to use .NET Core. This may be expected if the target process did not run on .NET Core. The program '[8200] xsd.exe' has exited with code 1 (0x1). I assume that xsd.exe is also just not capable of loading and reflecting .NET Standard libraries. Commented Apr 14, 2021 at 7:47

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