-1

This code should get

  • number of equations (n)
  • matrix a
  • matrix b
  • accuracy of answer (e)as input

And then find the answer of n equations by Jacobi method.

My code:

     #include <cstdlib>
     #include <iostream>
     #include <conio.h>
     #include <math.h>

using namespace std; // DEV software code for using 'cin' instead 'scanf' 
int main()
{
    int n,i,j,l=0;
    cout<<"Enter number of Equations = ";
    cin>>n;
    double a[n-1][n-1],b[n-1][1],x[n-1][1],T[n-1][1],e,k;
    cout<<"[a].[x]=[b]"<<endl;
    cout<<"Enter Matrix a:"<<endl;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    for(j=0;j<n;j++)
    {
        cout<<"a["<<i<<","<<j<<"] = ";
        cin>>a[i][j];
    }
    cout<<"Enter Matrix b:"<<endl;
    for(j=0;j<n;j++)
    {
        cout<<"b[0,"<<j<<"] = ";
        cin>>b[0][j];
    }
    cout<<"Enter the Accuracy = ";
    cin>>e;
    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
        T[i][0]=0;
    while (l!=n)
    {
        l=0;
        for (i=0;i<n;i++)
        {
            x[i][0]=(1/a[i][i])*(b[i][0]);
            for (j=0;j<n;j++)
            {
                if (j!=i)
                x[i][0]=x[i][0]-(1/a[i][i])*(a[i][j]*T[j][0]);
            }
        }
        for(i=0;i<n;i++)
        {
            k=fabs(x[i][0]-T[i][0]);
            if (k<=e)
            {
                l=l+1;
            }
        }
    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
        T[i][0]=x[i][0];
    }
    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
        cout<<"x"<<i+1<<"="<<x[i][0]<<endl;
    getch();
    return 0;
}

For example: (e.g.)

     // Initializing variables
n=2
e=0.001
a[0,0]=4
a[0,1]=2
a[1,0]=1
a[1,1]=3
b[0,0]=1
b[1,0]=-1 

The answer should be x1=0.5 and x2=-0.5. But the output of this code is x1=0.35 and x2=-0.45.

What's the problem?

Regards

  • Have you tried using a debugger and step in your code to see what's happening? – Eregrith Jun 4 '15 at 13:48
  • And you found that everything is going according to what you would have done by hand? – Eregrith Jun 4 '15 at 13:50
  • 1
    Well, that can't be. If the answer is wrong, something else has gone wrong further up. Use a debugger to follow the output back up to see where it goes awry. – Carcigenicate Jun 4 '15 at 13:54
  • 1
    As @Carcigenicate said. Step by step you should see your variables, and follow on your side by hand. If at any time there is a diff you should see it. If until the end you have the same value x1=0.5 on both hand and computer calculus, and when you print(x1) you get 0.35 you have a whole other level of problem – Eregrith Jun 4 '15 at 14:10
  • 3
    @Eregrith But I can almost guarantee that that won't be the case. Blaming the compiler (or whatever would cause such a problem) should be the absolute last step in debugging. – Carcigenicate Jun 4 '15 at 14:12
1

Your arrays look like they're short by one row and one column. You ask the user for n equations, but you only allocate n-1 rows and columns for a, b, x, T. Your declarations for those matricies and vectors should be double a[n][n], etc. You're currently writing outside the bounds of your arrays and possibly overwriting data in another matrix.

By the way, I got the right answer (0.5, -0.5) when I applied my fix.

|improve this answer|||||
  • That's great..! Worked correctly. Thanks buddy, just can explain me more ? Unless we have not arrayname[0][0] in c++ ? I thought that I should reduce one unit to select key of [0][0] in array, anyway can you explain me more ? – Shafizadeh Jun 4 '15 at 14:33
  • When you declare an array, the argument in brackets is the size of the array, e.g. int x[4] declares an array of 4 elements. However, array indicies are zero-based, so when you access the 4th element, you need to write x[4-1], a.k.a. x[3]. In your loops where you read in the matrix elements, you write past the end of the arrays that you declared, which causes undefined behavior. Honestly, I almost never use raw arrays. I use std::array when I know the array size at compile time, and std::vector if I won't know the size until run time. – Carlton Jun 4 '15 at 14:39
1

First of All, all of arrays must be defined [n], NOT[n-1].(As your condition in for loops are "i less than n").

second, you don't need 2D array for "X" and "b" and T.(wasting Memory in really big dimensions). third, set you Accuracy= 0.00001. it works with flowing main loop: Main loop can be like:

 do                            
{
    for (i=0;i<n;i++)                
    {
        y=x[i];
        x[i]=(1/a[i][i])*(b[i]);
        for (j=0;j<n;j++)
        {
            if (j!=i)
              x[i]=x[i]-(1/a[i][i])*(a[i][j]*T[j]);

        }
        if (abs(x[i]-y)<=e)            
            flag++;
        cout<< x[i] << "  ";
    }

for (k=0;k<n;k++)
    T[k]=x[k];

    cout<<"\n";
    count++;   
}while(flag<n);
|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.