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Having discovered the contenteditable HTML attribute and would like to edit my local pages using my web browser.

I am generating these pages myself and storing them on the local file system, there is no server involved. e.g. file:///P:/MyFile.htm

With the new contenteditable attribute set for the whole BODY I can edit (and spellcheck in Chrome), but I can't save the new version.

Is it possible to create a simple bookmarklet that will save (download) the source, overwriting the original and refresh? The browser has all the necessary information and it sounds simple - but beyond my ken.

I'm happy to accept an overwrite yes/no dialogue, but don't want to have to navigate to the original file location each time I want to save the document. The bookmarklet should default to download if the current page is not a local file.

The closest I could find simply uses a generic file name and prompts to save to the download folder:

javascript:(function(){
var a=document.createElement('a');
a.href=location.href;a.download='filename.htm';
document.body.appendChild(a);
a.click();
a.parentNode.removeChild(a);
})();

When previously asked this question was not answered ( Q20306730 - Make edits to a webpage and save the changes locally) many assumed the files were served rather than local. Neither do I want an in-browser editor such as Raptor Editor.

We should use IE8 on Windows 7 at work, so I don't want to use Chrome addons.

Many thanks in advance.

Gavin

  • Doesn't look like there are any takers for this question. I guess having the ability to edit web pages and save your modified copy is a dangerous use of a web browser. Interestingly I can print the altered page! – Gavin Jul 30 '15 at 14:54
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If I understand it right, I think would use a language like C# or Python to accomplish that.

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Solution using chrome:

CTRL+S will offer to save the file with a default name generated from the page title+".html".

So if you can generate the page with a title equal to the file name (without the default extension ".html"), all you have to do is agree to overwrite.

You will have to navigate to the correct folder, but only the first time you save the file. Perhaps a custom save script might avoid this inconvenience - any ideas.

Gavin

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