2

I have a WCF REST service which has a resource which contains several typed fields, and then a field which can be an array of objects. I want the field on our service to serialize this field as if it were a string. Example:

[DataContract]
public class User
{
   [DataMember]
   public long ID;

   [DataMember]
   public string Logon;

   [DataMember]
   public string Features; 
}

When users of our API POST a new User object, I'd like them to be able to do use something like this as the body:

{
    "ID" : 123434,
    "Logon" : "MyLogon",
    "Features" : [ 
           { "type": "bigFeature", "size": 234, "display":true },
           { "type": "smFeature", "windowCount": 234, "enableTallness": true}
     ]
 }

instead of

{
    "ID" : 123434,
    "Logon" : "MyLogon",
    "Features" : "[ 
           { \"type\": \"bigFeature\", \"size\": 234, \"display\":true },
           { \"type\": \"smFeature\", \"windowCount\": 234, \"enableTallness\": true}
     ]"
 }

On the service side, I'm going to be saving the "Features" array as JSON text blog in the database, and when I return the Object on GET calls, I'd like it to round trip properly.

  • So you want to take your JSON string and then be able to serialize it/deserialize it via a function call? – Pseudonym Jun 4 '15 at 20:43
  • No, I wan to use DataContract and DataMember to define the data, but I'd like one of the fields to actually be a JSON Array, which would allow it to contain any JSON Object. That would then allow me to convert back and forth. – bpeikes Jun 4 '15 at 20:46
  • What serializer are you using -- DataContractJsonSerializer or Json.NET? – dbc Jun 4 '15 at 20:50
  • DataContractJsonSerializer, I've considered switching the the Json.NET one, but I remember having issues with it. Were you thinking that this might be possible with the Json.NET serializer? – bpeikes Jun 4 '15 at 21:07
  • 1
    It would be easier with Json.NET. DataContractJsonSerializer shares a code base with DataContractSerializer for XML (both inherit from XmlObjectSerializer) and doesn't give access to the "raw" JSON as far as I know. – dbc Jun 4 '15 at 21:50
1

If you were willing to switch to Json.NET, you could serialize your Features string as a private JToken proxy property:

[DataContract]
public class User
{
    [DataMember]
    public long ID;

    [DataMember]
    public string Logon;

    string _features = null;

    [IgnoreDataMember]
    public string Features
    {
        get
        {
            return _features;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                _features = null;
            else
            {
                JToken.Parse(value); // Throws an exception on invalid JSON.
                _features = value;
            }
        }
    }

    [DataMember(Name="Features")]
    JToken FeaturesJson
    {
        get
        {
            if (Features == null)
                return null;
            return JToken.Parse(Features);
        }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                Features = null;
            else
                Features = value.ToString(Formatting.Indented); // Or Formatting.None, if you prefer.
        }
    }
}

Note that, in order to serialize the Features string without escaping, it must be valid JSON, otherwise your outer JSON will be corrupt. I enforce this in the setter. You could use JArray instead of JToken to enforce the requirement that the string represent a JSON array, if you prefer.

Note that the string formatting isn't preserved during serialization.

  • I tried using a JToken as the DataMember, but I get a Deserialization exception: "Type 'Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JToken' is a recursive collection data contract which is not supported. Consider modifying the definition of collection 'Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JToken' to remove references to itself.", I think I need to switch from using the DataContractJsonSerializer to Newtonsoft, but I haven't found a good example of how to do that. – bpeikes Jun 4 '15 at 22:10
  • The first article requires changing all of your DataContracts to return Message or Stream, which I'm not fond of. The second one points to this article, which I saw a while back, but the code never even compiled correctly: blogs.msdn.com/b/carlosfigueira/archive/2011/05/03/… – bpeikes Jun 4 '15 at 22:36
  • Looks like using the code example in carlogsfigureira blog and the msdn example fail to note that they don't work with UriTemplates, which I use extensively. Have you gotten the code to work with UriTemplates? It works well with my POST requests, but my GET and DELETE requests need them. – bpeikes Jun 4 '15 at 23:41
  • 1
    They could be any valid json. Custom serialization with a SimpleDictionary won't suffice. – bpeikes Jun 5 '15 at 18:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.