2

Douglas Crockford, and thus, JSLint really dislike for loops. Most of the time I agree, and use [].forEach and Object.keys(obj) to iterate through arrays or dictionaries.

However, there are cases where the built in functions are not better than a for loop in any reasonable sense (as far as I know), and I dislike having warnings on my JSLints.

One such case is, when one has a bunch of items on a canvas. When drawing, you want to iterate through the array forwards, but when hit testing a mouse click, you need to iterate backwards. E.g.

// ...
drawItems = function () {
    objects.forEach(drawItem);
},
hitTest = function (x, y) {
    var i;
    for (i = objects.length - 1; i >= 0; i -= 1) {
        if (test(objects[i], x, y)) {
            return objects[i];
        }
    }
}
// ...

I can think of a couple of ways to pass the test, but they are all clunky. E.g.

hitTest = function (x, y) {
    var item;

    objects.reverse();
    objects.some(function (v) {
        if (test(v)) {
            item = v;
            return true;
        }
    });
    objects.reverse();
    return item;
}

and

hitTest = function (x, y) {
    return objects.reduceRight(
        function (prev, curr) {
            return prev || (
                test(curr, x, y)
                    ? curr
                    : prev
            );
        },
        undefined
    );
}

Which will pass JSLint happily, but, to be honest, look disgusting. I don't like the idea of "hacking" my code just to make it pass a test.

Other than choosing the "tolerate for statement" option (because that affects the linting of the rest of the code), how would I deal with this whilst avoiding wasteful operations like reversing or copying the array?

  • 2
    Why are you letting Crockford dictate your programming style? If you're sure you're doing it the right way, ignore jslint. – Barmar Jun 4 '15 at 23:21
  • 2
    Have you considered that you don't need to pass a JSLint test in order to have good working code? – scunliffe Jun 4 '15 at 23:22
  • The only good answers here are to ignore the jsLint warning, switch to a more flexible tool like jsHint that will let you embed a comment to skip this warning. You should not make your code obscure and less efficient just to remove a warning that shouldn't be there in the first place. jsLint is far too dictatorial in ways that are not always the best code. – jfriend00 Jun 4 '15 at 23:31
  • @Barmar I am certainly taking the path of ignoring this particular option. I was wondering whether there was a better way, as I certainly don't know all there is to know about Javascript. – Vincent McNabb Jun 4 '15 at 23:40
  • 2
    @Barmar & @scunliffe (& @jfriend00) (Warning: Pet peeve:) I'm not sure "use JSHint" comments really add to the JSLint tag much, as a general rule. Crockford's not an idiot. If someone doesn't want to use his tools, fine, but there's usually something important to learn from his "suggestions". The fact that there is a for:true JSLint directive shows he knows his for proscription is pretty controversial, and he doesn't really mind you using it for now. Now ask yourself why he prefers you don't, as the OP has... /shrug – ruffin Jun 5 '15 at 2:03
1

Since I'm of the opinion that you shouldn't de-optimize your code just to make a pointless warning go away, here are some of your options for dealing with this:

  1. Ignore the misguided warning.
  2. Switch to jsHint which allows you to instruct jsHint to ignore certain sections of code (with embedded comments).
  3. Isolate the code that jsLint is unhappy with in a function or a method so the warning only occurs once in your entire source rather than every time you want to do a reverse traverse.

For example, here's a reverse traverse function:

// traverse an array in reverse order
// if the callback returns true, iteration will be stopped
function reverseForEach(array, fn) {
    for (var i = array.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (fn(array[i], i, array) === true) {
            return;
        }
    }
}

Or, as a method on Array prototype:

// traverse an array in reverse order
// if the callback returns true, iteration will be stopped
Array.prototype.reverseForEach = function(fn) {
    for (var i = this.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (fn(array[i], i, this) === true) {
            return;
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    I ended up adding a prototype function called 'findRight' and 'find', and have them in a file which I don't bother JSLinting, along with a bunch of other Crockford unfriendly code. – Vincent McNabb Jun 5 '15 at 1:59
2

Ran into an interesting, reverse-free alternative fix here -- see the 3rd & 4th -- while looking at something else today. Easy enough to swap from jQuery's each to forEach or every. You have to get the length for your original for anyhow, so actually pretty clean, though a little hipster.

/*jslint white:true, devel:true */
var a = [3,4,5,6], max = a.length-1;
a.forEach(function (ignore, i) {
    "use strict";
    console.log(a[max-i]);
});

I'm a little worried about performance, since you're pulling out elements twice with each iteration, once at a[max-i], and once with the forEach's callback's (here, throwaway) third argument, though maybe that's a micro-optimization concern.

Using forEach only for the indicies is what's setting off the hipster warning. Ironic, since Crockford has shown a stark dislike for hipsters in the past, so I'm not sure he'd like this "fix" either -- none of us may have answered your "meta-question". Tempted to bug Crockford's list; this is a good and interesting question, but you don't always get a good answer on that list.

But that's a pretty (deceptively?) clean looking workaround.

  • Nice one :-) Although it looks better than the other non-for-loop alternatives, once understanding what it does, it still feels very very wrong. I'd proffer that people who blindly follow Crockford (or anyone else) are "hipsters" because they're doing something that's "right" because someone said so, rather than finding the optimal solution by thinking for themselves about the pitfalls. I also don't like having to put "ignore" in function calls to pass JSLint. The parameter IS a value, so it should be called that even if it's ignored. – Vincent McNabb Jun 8 '15 at 21:52
  • Yeah, I'm partial to using the for directive in JSLint myself right now. I like the LINQ-like format of every & forEach, but ultimately "The for syntax is so weird anyway with the thing with the three statements in it," doesn't feel like a solid, rational justification to completely leave a well-understood programming convention. I did post about your question to Crockford's JSLint Google+ group. Hopefully he'll have a good answer. – ruffin Jun 8 '15 at 22:36
0

You can slice the array so that your hitTest doesn't have any potential side-effects.

hitTest = function (x, y) {
    return objects.slice(0).reverse().find(function(v) {
        return test(v);
    });
}

This way you don't have to worry that you'll forget to re-reverse the array.

  • 1
    Copying and reversing the array, just to traverse the array backwards is downright wasteful. In addition, the .find() method is not supported in IE or Chrome so not much good for general use. – jfriend00 Jun 4 '15 at 23:26
  • 1
    @jfriend00 some(), which was used in the question, also only has partial support, so I assume the OP doesn't mind. slice is really fast, especially in Chrome, and while reverse may be slower, it shouldn't matter if it makes more readable code. Since this code is run in response to user input, readability matters more than saving a few ms, IMO. – acbabis Jun 4 '15 at 23:31
  • 1
    .some() has much broader browser support than .find(). And, why copy the array just to traverse it? The whole notion of adding complication to your code just to bypass a jsLint warning that shouldn't be there in the first place is just dumb. jsLint is what is wrong here, not the code. – jfriend00 Jun 4 '15 at 23:32
  • @jfriend00 I don't personally agree with JSLint in this particular case either, but also I think not wanting a loop is a legitimate preference and a matter of opinion. The code I posted is more declarative, and some people would probably find it easier to read. – acbabis Jun 4 '15 at 23:41
  • Besides, it's not like .find() or .forEach() don't have a loop in them - they do - it's just hidden behind a function call. – jfriend00 Jun 5 '15 at 0:41

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