2

I know iota function, but it will just work integer values since it is calling ++ operator.

I want to generate increasing float numbers by lets say 0.5 like [0.5, 1, 1.5....], and insert them to my vector

The final solution I came up with is :

    double last = 0;
    std::generate(out , out + 10, [&]{
        return last += 0.5; 
    }); 

Which kind of works but I have to use a extra variable. Is there a std func that I am missing like the function "iota" in "D language" example : auto rf = iota(0.0, 0.5, 0.1);

2
  • so do you want to increase the values in a vector, or to generate a series of increasing numbers? Jun 5 '15 at 11:40
  • Generate a series of increasing numbers, I edited the question I hope it is more understandable. Jun 5 '15 at 11:42
3

If your compiler supports C++ 2014 when you can write

double a[10];

std::generate( a, a + 10, 
              [step = 0.0] () mutable { return step += 0.5; } );

for ( double x : a ) std::cout << x << ' ';
std::cout << std::endl;

The output will be

0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5

That is you may use an init capture without declaring an extra variable in the scope where the lambda is defined.

Otherwise you can declare a static variable inside the lambda expression. For example

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

int main() 
{
    double a[10];

    std::generate( a, a + 10, 
                  [] () mutable ->double { static double value; return value += 0.5; } );

    for ( double x : a ) std::cout << x << ' ';
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The output will be the same

0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 
7
  • Thank a lot very elegant solution, only problem I have vs2012 :( Jun 8 '15 at 8:58
  • Thanks a lot, I am almost sure this is the best way but I am still hoping for a better boost or std way. Also even globals (statics are also like globals and that is why I don't like the idea) always initiliaze with 0, I think initiating the static variable still good idea. Jun 8 '15 at 9:13
  • @Kadir Erdem Static variables of fundamental types are zero initialized by the compiler. This static variable is alive only within the call of the algorithm because it is a static data member of the unnamed class that corresponds to the lambda. Jun 8 '15 at 9:23
  • I am just asking to learn. So , void foo () { static int i) and [](){static int i}; are different. Is there any link you know about "static data member of unnamed class" subject? Jun 8 '15 at 11:06
  • @Kadir Erdem Demir I think you should download the Working Draft of C++ Standard from ISO site. LAmbda expressions are not functions. They are function objects that is they are defined as unnamed classes. Jun 8 '15 at 11:13
2

You can use transform after iota:

iota(begin(a), end(a), 0);    
const auto op = bind(multiplies<double>(), placeholders::_1, .5);
transform(begin(a), end(a), begin(a), op);

alternatively using boost::counting_iterator:

transform(boost::counting_iterator<int>(0),
          boost::counting_iterator<int>(n),
          begin(a),
          bind(multiplies<double>(), placeholders::_1, .5));
4
  • But what if the range is not like 1 to 10 but a float range like 0.0 to 0.5. Will it work ? Jun 5 '15 at 11:55
  • what do u mean? as long as you are incrementing by a constant this should work Jun 5 '15 at 11:57
  • Or with a lambda instead of bind: auto op = [ ](double& a){ a *= 0.5; };
    – MSalters
    Jun 5 '15 at 12:35
  • @behzad.nouri what I meant was; lets say my range is : 0.0, 0.5 and I want to increment by 0.1 , so result will be 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 Jun 8 '15 at 8:56

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