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We have an OData-compliant API that delegates some of its full text search needs to an Elasticsearch cluster. Since OData expressions can get quite complex, we decided to simply translate them into their equivalent Lucene query syntax and feed it into a query_string query.

We do support some text-related OData filter expressions, such as:

  • startswith(field,'bla')
  • endswith(field,'bla')
  • substringof('bla',field)
  • name eq 'bla'

The fields we're matching against can be analyzed, not_analyzed or both (i.e. via a multi-field). The searched text can be a single token (e.g. table), only a part thereof (e.g. tab), or several tokens (e.g. table 1., table 10, etc). The search must be case-insensitive.

Here are some examples of the behavior we need to support:

  • startswith(name,'table 1') must match "Table 1", "table 100", "Table 1.5", "table 112 upper level"
  • endswith(name,'table 1') must match "Room 1, Table 1", "Subtable 1", "table 1", "Jeff table 1"
  • substringof('table 1',name) must match "Big Table 1 back", "table 1", "Table 1", "Small Table12"
  • name eq 'table 1' must match "Table 1", "TABLE 1", "table 1"

So basically, we take the user input (i.e. what is passed into the 2nd parameter of startswith/endswith, resp. the 1st parameter of substringof, resp. the right-hand side value of the eq) and try to match it exactly, whether the tokens fully match or only partially.

Right now, we're getting away with a clumsy solution highlighted below which works pretty well, but is far from being ideal.

In our query_string, we match against a not_analyzed field using the Regular Expression syntax. Since the field is not_analyzed and the search must be case-insensitive, we do our own tokenizing while preparing the regular expression to feed into the query in order to come up with something like this, i.e. this is equivalent to the OData filter endswith(name,'table 8') (=> match all documents whose name ends with "table 8")

  "query": {
    "query_string": {
      "query": "name.raw:/.*(T|t)(A|a)(B|b)(L|l)(E|e) 8/",
      "lowercase_expanded_terms": false,
      "analyze_wildcard": true
    }
  }

So, even though, this solution works pretty well and the performance is not too bad (which came out as a surprise), we'd like to do it differently and leverage the full power of analyzers in order to shift all this burden at indexing time instead of searching time. However, since reindexing all our data will take weeks, we'd like to first investigate if there's a good combination of token filters and analyzers that would help us achieve the same search requirements enumerated above.

My thinking is that the ideal solution would contain some wise mix of shingles (i.e. several tokens together) and edge-nGram (i.e. to match at the start or end of a token). What I'm not sure of, though, is whether it is possible to make them work together in order to match several tokens, where one of the tokens might not be fully input by the user). For instance, if the indexed name field is "Big Table 123", I need substringof('table 1',name) to match it, so "table" is a fully matched token, while "1" is only a prefix of the next token.

Thanks in advance for sharing your braincells on this one.

UPDATE 1: after testing Andrei's solution

=> Exact match (eq) and startswith work perfectly.

A. endswith glitches

Searching for substringof('table 112', name) yields 107 docs. Searching for a more specific case such as endswith(name, 'table 112') yields 1525 docs, while it should yield less docs (suffix matches should be a subset of substring matches). Checking in more depth I've found some mismatches, such as "Social Club, Table 12" (doesn't contain "112") or "Order 312" (contains neither "table" nor "112"). I guess it's because they end with "12" and that's a valid gram for the token "112", hence the match.

B. substringof glitches

Searching for substringof('table',name) matches "Party table", "Alex on big table" but doesn't match "Table 1", "table 112", etc. Searching for substringof('tabl',name) doesn't match anything

UPDATE 2

It was sort of implied but I forgot to explicitely mention that the solution will have to work with the query_string query, mainly due to the fact that the OData expressions (however complex they might be) will keep getting translated into their Lucene equivalent. I'm aware that we're trading off the power of the Elasticsearch Query DSL with the Lucene's query syntax, which is a bit less powerful and less expressive, but that's something that we can't really change. We're pretty d**n close, though!

UPDATE 3 (June 25th, 2019):

ES 7.2 introduced a new data type called search_as_you_type that allows this kind of behavior natively. Read more at: https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/elasticsearch/reference/7.2/search-as-you-type.html

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  • Wow, looks like Lucene regex is as primitive as it gets, really sparse in way of constructs, no case flags, etc.., Basically it just sucks. You can build your own expressions. Example \d+ would be [0-9]+. You could even get a little fancy with unrolled-loop method.
    – user557597
    Jun 10, 2015 at 18:56
  • I have more or less the exact same requirements, only I'm starting from scratch. Could you please elaborate on how you would setup and use search_as_you_type, if you tried going that route.
    – aznan
    Mar 16, 2020 at 15:50

1 Answer 1

14
+100

This is an interesting use case. Here's my take:

{
  "settings": {
    "analysis": {
      "analyzer": {
        "my_ngram_analyzer": {
          "tokenizer": "my_ngram_tokenizer",
          "filter": ["lowercase"]
        },
        "my_edge_ngram_analyzer": {
          "tokenizer": "my_edge_ngram_tokenizer",
          "filter": ["lowercase"]
        },
        "my_reverse_edge_ngram_analyzer": {
          "tokenizer": "keyword",
          "filter" : ["lowercase","reverse","substring","reverse"]
        },
        "lowercase_keyword": {
          "type": "custom",
          "filter": ["lowercase"],
          "tokenizer": "keyword"
        }
      },
      "tokenizer": {
        "my_ngram_tokenizer": {
          "type": "nGram",
          "min_gram": "2",
          "max_gram": "25"
        },
        "my_edge_ngram_tokenizer": {
          "type": "edgeNGram",
          "min_gram": "2",
          "max_gram": "25"
        }
      },
      "filter": {
        "substring": {
          "type": "edgeNGram",
          "min_gram": 2,
          "max_gram": 25
        }
      }
    }
  },
  "mappings": {
    "test_type": {
      "properties": {
        "text": {
          "type": "string",
          "analyzer": "my_ngram_analyzer",
          "fields": {
            "starts_with": {
              "type": "string",
              "analyzer": "my_edge_ngram_analyzer"
            },
            "ends_with": {
              "type": "string",
              "analyzer": "my_reverse_edge_ngram_analyzer"
            },
            "exact_case_insensitive_match": {
              "type": "string",
              "analyzer": "lowercase_keyword"
            }
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
}
  • my_ngram_analyzer is used to split every text into small pieces, how large the pieces are depends on your use case. I chose, for testing purposes, 25 chars. lowercase is used since you said case-insensitive. Basically, this is the tokenizer used for substringof('table 1',name). The query is simple:
{
  "query": {
    "term": {
      "text": {
        "value": "table 1"
      }
    }
  }
}
  • my_edge_ngram_analyzer is used to split the text starting from the beginning and this is specifically used for the startswith(name,'table 1') use case. Again, the query is simple:
{
  "query": {
    "term": {
      "text.starts_with": {
        "value": "table 1"
      }
    }
  }
}
  • I found this the most tricky part - the one for endswith(name,'table 1'). For this I defined my_reverse_edge_ngram_analyzer which uses a keyword tokenizer together with lowercase and an edgeNGram filter preceded and followed by a reverse filter. What this tokenizer basically does is to split the text in edgeNGrams but the edge is the end of the text, not the start (like with the regular edgeNGram). The query:
{
  "query": {
    "term": {
      "text.ends_with": {
        "value": "table 1"
      }
    }
  }
}
  • for the name eq 'table 1' case, a simple keyword tokenizer together with a lowercase filter should do it The query:
{
  "query": {
    "term": {
      "text.exact_case_insensitive_match": {
        "value": "table 1"
      }
    }
  }
}

Regarding query_string, this changes the solution a bit, because I was counting on term to not analyze the input text and to match it exactly with one of the terms in the index.

But this can be "simulated" with query_string if the appropriate analyzer is specified for it.

The solution would be a set of queries like the following (always use that analyzer, changing only the field name):

{
  "query": {
    "query_string": {
      "query": "text.starts_with:(\"table 1\")",
      "analyzer": "lowercase_keyword"
    }
  }
}
14
  • Andrei, thanks a lot for your suggestion, much appreciated! I've updated my question as we've added support for eq in the meantime (for a case-insensitive exact match). How would you approach that case?
    – Val
    Jun 11, 2015 at 3:06
  • For the eq part it should be a straight forward keyword tokenizer + lowercase filter. Updated my answer. Jun 11, 2015 at 5:42
  • Excellent, thanks for your prompt answer! I'm going to shake it all out on real data and come back here asap, but at first glance I'm pretty confident it'll work out well. Stay tuned...
    – Val
    Jun 11, 2015 at 5:50
  • It works 99% great, very promising solution! Exact match and startswith work perfectly, though I've found some glitches with substringof and endswith. I'm updating my question above with some results.
    – Val
    Jun 11, 2015 at 7:23
  • Hm, I have one explanation for one mismatch, but I have the feeling you are not testing this with a term, but with a match or something else. The different thing in your updated tests is that you are searching text with upper case letters :-), like Table 112. For this to match the terms in the index, the index and search analyzers need to be separated. For search I'm thinking keyword and lowercase and not using term query, but a match. Jun 11, 2015 at 7:53

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