5

How can I set a collection to modified in the same way that I would do

_context.Entry(thing).Property(x => x.MyProperty).isModified = true;

like:

_context.Entry(thing).Collection(x => x.MyCollection).isModified = true;

EDIT: The purpose of this, is that my collection is a list of objects stored in a lookup table. I will only have a list of stubs with their id's in this collection and I would like to update the relationships without messing with the audit values and whatever else is contains within the lookup objects. For instance, a contact will have multiple contact types, which for whatever reason are complex objects in this scenario. I want to be able to add and remove types using only the FKs and let EF handle the relationship fixups.

public class Contact
{
   public int Id {get;set;}
   public list<ContactTypes> ContactTypes {get;set;}
   //audit values/other properties
}

public class ContactType
{
   public int Id {get;set;}
   public string Value {get;set;}
}
1
  • Please show the (essentials of) the class model and indicate what you intend to modify. Words leave too much room for ambiguity. Jun 5, 2015 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

3

context.Entry represents a single entity, never a collection. So you have to loop through the collection and mark each entity as modified.

1
  • 1
    Did you see my edit? Is there it possible to achieve what I'm trying to do? Or should I just come from another direction entirely?
    – Chazt3n
    Jun 5, 2015 at 14:50
1

If you have a list of ForeignKey objects, you probably know how frustrating it is to force EF's Relationship Fixup on them. Here's slick way to do that.

public void SetContactTypesToUnchanged(Contact contact)
  {
    contact.ContactTypes.Each(type => _context.Entry(type).State = EntityState.Unchanged);
    _context.SaveChanges();
  }
2
  • 1
    This is indeed slick, but from which function/namespace is Each() from? I don't see it in docs for List<T>'s or LINQ.
    – Dragomok
    May 22, 2017 at 19:43
  • 1
    Hey @Dragomok I'm sorry for the late response. Good catch there, I've grown so used to that function over the years I feel weird not seeing it. Here's the source code: public static void Each<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T> action) { foreach (T item in enumerable) { action(item); } }
    – Chazt3n
    May 26, 2017 at 18:19

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