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With so many articles on the "proper," "semantic," and "accessible" use of forms and architecture, I'm rethinking how I approach forms. There are literally so many variations of what is "right" that I'm not 100% on what is really accurate anymore.

In an MDN article (here), it mentions:

With this example, a screen reader will pronounce "Fruit juice size small" for the first widget, "Fruit juice size medium" for the second, and "Fruit juice size large" for the third.

<form>
  <fieldset>
    <legend>Fruit juice size</legend>
    <p>
      <input type="radio" name="size" id="size_1" value="small" />
      <label for="size_1">Small</label>
    </p>
    <p>
      <input type="radio" name="size" id="size_2" value="medium" />
      <label for="size_2">Medium</label>
    </p>
    <p>
      <input type="radio" name="size" id="size_3" value="large" />
      <label for="size_3">Large</label>
    </p>
  </fieldset>
</form>

Now, I can see the benefit of this for something like the example above, however, say I made a multi-step shopping cart, I wouldn't want assistive technology to speak "Checkout: cc-number," "Checkout: cc-date" using "checkout" prior to every label. Especially in cases where steps are labelled. This would be repetitive and sometimes confusing I would assume... But I've always grouped sections of a form within a <fieldset>. Now I'm rethinking using fieldset and legend at all, but does it now go against semantics? What's the trade-off? Is there a balance?

Additionally, and I'll use the same MDN article so I'm not sending you all over the web,

Note that even without considering assistive technologies, having a formal label set for a given widget lets users to click on the label to activate the corresponding widget in all browsers. This is especially useful for radio buttons and checkboxes.

Some assistive technologies can have trouble handling multiple labels for a single widget. Because of this, you should nest a widget inside its corresponding element to build an accessible form.

<form>
  <p>
    <input type="checkbox" id="taste_1" name="taste_cherry" value="1">
    <label for="taste_1">I like cherry</label>
  </p>
  <p>
    <label for="taste_2">
      <input type="checkbox" id="taste_2" name="taste_banana" value="1">
      I like banana
    </label>
  </p>
</form>

Now, in this instance, the labeling for both these items are reasonably common, I have used both methods, but is there a balance between accessibility and semantics here? I tend to put the label not wrapping the input for consistency in code and I know their is strong debate on this subject (mainly the ability to drop the for and not need the id and/or having labels in different areas of the markup). So, I'm not trying to rehash the debate here, I tend to use the for and id regardless if I wrap elements in a label or not. But if there is an accessibility concern for one then why isn't the latter the golden standard?

Yet another point, WAI-Aria rules now contribute, so how much do these rules really impact the accessibility and semantics of a form?

<p>Required fields are followed by <strong><abbr title="required">*</abbr></strong>.</p>
<form>
  <fieldset>
    <legend>Fruit juice size*</legend>
    <p>
      <label for="size_1">
        <input type="radio" name="size" id="size_1" value="small" aria-labelledby="size_1_label" />
        <span id="size_1_label" required aria-required="true">Small</span>
      </label>
    </p>
    <p>
      <label for="size_2">
        <input type="radio" name="size" id="size_2" value="medium" aria-labelledby="size_2_label" />
        <span id="size_2_label">Medium</span>
      </label>
    </p>
    <p>
      <label for="size_3">
        <input type="radio" name="size" id="size_3" value="large" aria-labelledby="size_3_label" />
        <span id="size_3_label">Large</span>
      </label>
    </p>
  </fieldset>
</form>

I'm really just curious whether or not there is a standardized method of approach when dealing with Semantic and Accessible markup. So far it seems people just do whatever they feel is right and then vocalize their thoughts all over the internet.

I've read through W3C's drafts and recommendations but even they use varying examples. Does anyone have evidence of what approach really improves accessibility and semantics in relation to forms? Are their any particular websites that have the time an resources to test this and draw an accurate conclusion that I'd be able to review?

  • 1
    This is probably one of those posts that is more appropriate for ux.stackexchange.com, if so just let me know. – darcher Jun 5 '15 at 15:07
  • You've read the WCAG 2.0 docs? – steveax Jun 5 '15 at 15:12
  • I have, and have implemented many things relating to dynamic aria-states based on it, but with so much information I've found it difficult to pinpoint examples that are form specific and all encompassing. – darcher Jun 5 '15 at 15:19
  • 2
    The best advice I can give you is to know the WGAG documentation, take your best shot at the markup and properties, and most importantly, test. Test things yourself, and engage your users to help you test and provide feedback. Make sure you have a prominent and easy way for your users who employ assistive technology to provide feedback. You clearly care about your users and a11y and that is the essential first step. – steveax Jun 6 '15 at 1:23
  • 1
    Also, get involved in an a11y user group, looks like there is one not far from you? – steveax Jun 6 '15 at 1:30
5

The answer to your question really is "it depends".

All of the accessible markup you list above is valid. So if you are simply looking for accessible markup, you can use any of the examples. The rest of the decisions really come down to

  1. error handling, and
  2. additional instructions

Error Handling

When errors appear in your form, they need to be programmatically associated with the form fields that they reference. There are two ways to do this while maintaining the label itself:

Add the error to the label

You can add the error text to the label itself. Having a wrapped label gives you more flexibility over the order that this error text occurs in the DOM. you can place the error before the label, after the label, after the input or before the input. For this reason, you might choose to use the wrapping technique instead of the non-wrapping technique:

<label>My Input
    <input type="text" aria-invalid="true" id="myinput" name="myinput"/>
    <span class="error">The input field must be a valid username</span>
</label>

Associate the error using ARIA

The second technique is to associate the error using ARIA. This is very flexible because it allows multiple elements to form the label of the input and can also be used for additional instructions.

<label id="mylabel">My Input</label>
<input type="text" aria-invalid="true" aria-labelledby="mylabel myerror"/>
<span id="myerror" class="error">The input field must be a valid username</span>

Now if your input is a checkbox or radio button, you will want to maintain the for and id association so that the user can click (or touch) the label in order to activate the checkbox/radio.

Additional Instructions

As mentioned above, using ARIA labelling techniques, you can associate multiple elements with a single input field. This is useful for providing additional instructions and hints. aria-labelledby is used for the accessible name (label) whereas aria-describedby can be used for a hint and can also reference multiple elements by using multiple ids.

<label id="mylabel">My Input</label>
<input type="text" aria-invalid="true" aria-labelledby="mylabel myerror" aria-describedby="unameinstructions"/>
<span id="myerror" class="error">The input field must be a valid username</span>
<span id="unameinstructions">A valid user name must contain at least one alpha, one numeric character and must be at least 8 characters</span>

Here is a presentation I created on accessible dynamic forms http://www.slideshare.net/dylanbarrell/accessible-dynamic-forms-27169766 it references some example code that can be found here https://github.com/dylanb/a11yvalid and the running example of good best practices (except perhaps the CSS styling choices) can be found here http://dylanb.github.io/bower_components/a11yfy/examples/form-validation.html

  • Sorry for the late response, was out of town this weekend. I appreciate the detailed input and links. I'll start reviewing and comparing how I have our forms setup and try to bring it a little more in line with these approaches. – darcher Jun 8 '15 at 15:55
  • Should the <span class="error"> element also include the "role" attribute with the value "alert" as shown here? Also notice on that page that the error is associated with the input using aria-describedby, rather than aria-labeledby. Is there an official reference that states which one should be used? Thanks. – John S Nov 17 '16 at 5:28
  • The general answer to use of role="alert" is "no" because it does not get announced consistently in all cases. Specifically, if multiple fields have errors, then they might interfere with each other and if the validation is done with a page refresh, they may not be read out at all. However, in certain controlled circumstances, role="alert" might be useful. Whether to use aria-labelledby (note the spelling) or aria-describedby is really more of a usability question. – unobf Nov 17 '16 at 16:17
  • Thanks for the answer, and face-palm on the spelling. I had earlier dinged another developer in a code review for misspelling it like that. Perhaps I shouldn't have made my code review comment bold and in red text. – John S Nov 19 '16 at 5:01

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