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This is probably an easy one (it may even be a dupe), but I cannot find answer to this - how to print number using Hebrew letters?

I've tried to change app language and/or using format provider:

myTextBox.Text = 555.ToString(new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("he-IL"));

but I can't get Hebrew letters.

2
  • Would you expect to see הנת״ק – xxbbcc Jun 5 '15 at 20:30
  • Sorry for the first comment - I'm not at all famillar with Hebrew and just copied the symbols from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_numerals. The textbox started behaving erratically once I did so I couldn't finish the comment. Is that what you expect to see? (The symbols are left-to-right but obviously, I don't know if that's correct or not. Just asking as clarification. – xxbbcc Jun 5 '15 at 20:31
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In hebrew we use the same numbers as in english. However, hebrew letters can indicate numbers.
For א that is 1, ב is 2 and so on. But after you reach י which is 10, the next letter is כ, but it stands for 20. So 11 would be י"א. (that's the way it's written in hebrew, with the " mark between the letters).
Your next letter would be 30 and so on untill you get to 100, then the next one is 200, 300 and the last letter is 400 (ת).

The entier hebrew alphabet is:
(note that the hebrew letters are written from right to left, meaning that א is the first and י is the last in the first row)
אבגדהוזחטי (that's 1 to 10)
כלמנסעפצ (that's 20 to 90)
קרשת (that's 100 to 400)

(there are some spacial letters with different forms for ending a word, but they have the same numeric value as the regular letter. for example, ך is the way to write the letter כ if it's the final letter of a word, but it's still 20 for the numeric value)

So the number 600 may translate to שש"ש, or to ש"ת, or any combination of letters that will sum up to 600. Of course, this may pose a problem for you if you want to translate numbers to hebrew letters.

I would probably go for the shortest combination possible, so test for the highest value letter that can be used recursively until you can sum all the letters you have to the requested number.

4
  • Yeah, I've just changed emulators language and found that indeed the same as in English decimal letters are used. Thank you for detailed information how Hebrew numerals work. – Romasz Jun 5 '15 at 20:43
  • 1
    well, if you can't get that from a jew, where can you get that from? :-) – Zohar Peled Jun 5 '15 at 20:45
  • Yeah, that's the best source. It's interesting that number can be presented in few different ways. – Romasz Jun 5 '15 at 20:58
  • The same is true of Roman numerals, though there are preferences toward being as concise as possible, with the peculiar exception of IIII often being favoured over IV on clock faces. – Jon Hanna Jun 5 '15 at 21:44
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As Zohar says, in most uses Hebrew uses the same Indo-Arabic digits as English. If you really do want to write out a number using Hebrew letters though, a simple approach is:

public static string FormatHebrew(this int num)
{
  if(num <= 0)
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
  StringBuilder ret = new StringBuilder(new string ('ת', num / 400));
  num %= 400;
  if(num >= 100)
  {
    ret.Append("קרש"[num / 100 - 1]);
    num %= 100;
  }
  switch(num)
  {
    // Avoid letter combinations from the Tetragrammaton
    case 16:
      ret.Append("טז");
      break;
    case 15:
      ret.Append("טו");
      break;
    default:
      if (num >= 10)
      {
        ret.Append("כלמנסעפצי"[num / 10 - 1]);
        num %= 10;
      }
      if(num > 0)
        ret.Append ("אבגדהוזחט" [num - 1]);
        break;
  }
  return ret.ToString ();
}

(Do make sure your text editor handles the ordering of the strings correctly, the main thing is that the source code as seen by the compiler has them in lower-to-higher order. A good text-editor will show that as right-to-left as that's the order Hebrew uses, but some will show it reversed from that).

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  • Nice! But doesn't account for ט"ו and ט"ז. Also, on the first line, did you mean: num <=0 ? – as9876 Oct 11 '15 at 17:06
  • @AYS correct about the check at the beginning, thanks. On the other matter, are you referring to avoiding hitting the tetragrammaton within the string? – Jon Hanna Oct 11 '15 at 17:32
  • Yes, I am referring to that. – as9876 Oct 11 '15 at 17:35
  • @AYS. Yes, since the point is to offer a way of writing at least one of the possible traditional encodings, and since avoiding those two combinations is part of the tradition, I really should have done so, I'll edit in the morning. – Jon Hanna Oct 11 '15 at 22:17
  • 2
    looks like a bug - the string "כלמנסעפצי" should be "יכלמנסעפצ" (the yud - 10 - moved to the beginning of the string). – mosheb Dec 9 '15 at 22:17
0
static String[] let1000 = { " א'", " ב'", " ג'", " ד'", " ה'" };
static String[] let100 = { "ק", "ר", "ש", "ת" };
static String[] let10 = { "י", "כ", "ל", "מ", "נ", "ס", "ע", "פ", "צ" };
static String[] let1 = { "א", "ב", "ג", "ד", "ה", "ו", "ז", "ח", "ט" };

public static String FormatHebrew(int num) throws Exception {

    if (num <= 0 || num >= 6000)
        throw new Exception();
    StringBuilder ret = new StringBuilder();

    if (num >= 100) {
        if (num >= 1000 & num < 6000) {

            ret.append(let1000[num / 1000 - 1]);
            num %= 1000;
        }

        if (num < 500) {

            ret.append(let100[(num / 100) - 1]);

        } else if (num >= 500 && num < 900) {
            ret.append("ת");
            ret.append(let100[((num - 400) / 100) - 1]);
        } else if (num >= 900 && num < 1000) {
            ret.append("תת");
            ret.append(let100[((num - 800) / 100) - 1]);

        }

        num %= 100;
    }
    switch (num) {
    // Avoid letter combinations from the Tetragrammaton
    case 16:
        ret.append("טז");
        break;
    case 15:
        ret.append("טו");
        break;
    default:
        if (num >= 10) {

            ret.append(let10[(num / 10) - 1]);
            num %= 10;
        }
        if (num > 0) {

            ret.append(let1[num - 1]);
        }
        break;
    }
    return ret.toString();
}
1
  • This code is suitable when you want to convert a Hebrew year from numbers to Hebrew letters – asaf holzer Dec 6 '20 at 1:01

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