10

I want to implement a checkpoint system for a game I am working on and for that I need to copy all mutable objects within a level in order to create an independent copy of the level. In a simplified example my classes look something like this:

public class GameObject
{
    ...
    private Level level;
    ...
}

public class Level
{
    ...
    private List<GameObject> gameObjects;
    ...
}

But there is a problem: When I want to duplicate a level and its objects the references become inconsistent. For example, I could deep-copy my Level-instance and deep-copy all gameObjects. But when I do that, the Level-reference in GameObject is no longer pointing at the "right" (new) level. In this case I could just call a method for each object and reset its level. But that would get increasingly complex with more and more types of objects involded, as objects might or might not have their own sets of objects they created and then those references have to be updated as well and so on.

Is there anything like a design-pattern for this kind of situation, or anything Java-specific that makes this problem much easier?

Edit

I just had an idea: How about creating some kind of wrapper class for each GameObject that looks like this:

public class GameObjectWrapper
{
    ...
    private long gameObjectID;
    private Level level;
    ...
}

This would be given as a reference to all objects which need references. And each GameObject would get a unique id and level would have a map linking each id to an actual GameObject (something like GameObject Level.getObject(long id)). While this would probably work, I still feel like there must be a better solution.

Edit: Further clarification

It seems like I did not make my issue clear enough, so I will simplify and generalize it a bit more:

I got two example objects (objectA and objectB): objectA contains a reference to objectB and objectB contains a reference to objectA.

Something like this:

public class MyObject
{
   private MyObject partner;

   ...

   public MyObject shallowCopy()
   {
        return new MyObject(partner);
   }
}

I want to copy both. With shallow copy, I get two new objects: newObjectA and newObjectB. newObjectA's stored reference (which is supposed to point to newObjectB), however, still points to the original objectB and vice-versa.

MyObject objectA = new MyObject(), objectB = new MyObject();

objectA.setPartner(objectB);
objectB.setPartner(objectA);

MyObject newObjectA = objectA.copy(); //newObjectA's partner now is objectB (instead of newObjectB)
MyObject newObjectB = objectB.copy(); //newObjectB's partner now is objectA (instead of newObjectA)

Now, I could "just" run through all my objects and map their old objects to new objects, but that seems slow and too complicated a solution to me. What is the simplest and most efficient way to resolve this?

Note: I considered posting this to gamedev.stackexchange.com, but I found this to be more of a programming and design specific problem than a game development specific problem.

  • Could you explain more? Why would the objects point to wrong levels after a copy? What is this "new" level? Code could be more understandable than plain text. – Bubletan Jun 6 '15 at 11:14
  • @Bubletan Thanks, I added more clarifying information. – flotothemoon Jun 6 '15 at 11:31
3

If you're only copying the Level object and want the references inside the list of it to point to the new copy, couldn't you just loop through them in the copy method.

Something like this:

class Level {

    List<GameObject> gameObjects;

    Level copy() {
        Level level = new Level();
        level.gameObjects = new ArrayList<>(gameObjects.size());
        for (GameObject gameObject : gameObjects) {
            level.gameObjects.add(gameObject.copyWithReference(level));
        }
        return level;
    }
}

class GameObject {

    Level level;

    GameObject copyWithReference(Level level) {
        GameObject gameObject = new GameObject();
        gameObject.level = level;
        return gameObject;
    }
}

Edit:

You could have a container for the gameObjects:

class GameObjectSet {

    Level level;
    List<GameObject> gameObjects;

    GameObjectSet copy(Level newLevel) {
        GameObjectSet gameObjectSet = new GameObjectSet();
        gameObjectSet.level = newLevel;
        // copy all gameObjects and make them point to new gameObjectSet
        return gameObjectSet;
    }
}

Now you would have a reference to a GameObjectSet in both in Level class and in GameObject class.

  • Thanks for your answer. Unfortunately, I dont only want to copy the level itself, but every object in it, in order to create a whole new independent level. Sorry if this wasn't clear, I've added it to my question. – flotothemoon Jun 6 '15 at 12:10
  • @1337 Edited the answer. – Bubletan Jun 6 '15 at 12:21
  • Thank, but I not only need to update the level references, that was just an example. There are all sorts of gameObjects referencing each other and I think going through all of them and then update the references might be a bit complicated. – flotothemoon Jun 6 '15 at 12:24
  • @1337 Mhm.. It's a bit hard to help without understanding the whole concept. – Bubletan Jun 6 '15 at 12:27
  • Basically, I want to copy an entire level with all its objects to create a new and independent level to be used as a checkpoint that I can use later. The problem is copying, because references get mixed up when copying. So my question is how to best maintain the relations between objects when copying. – flotothemoon Jun 6 '15 at 13:57
2

The classic solution to checkpointing is the Memento pattern.

That said, if you ever want to persist checkpoints, Java Serialization may be what you are looking for, as it retains object identities in addition to object states (within the same stream, that is). This would be something like:

ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
try (ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(baos)) {
    oos.writeObject(level);
}

byte[] checkpoint = baos.getBytes();

try (ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(checkpoint)) {
    Level level = (Level) ois.readObject();
    assert level == level.getGameObjects().get(0).getLevel();
}
  • Thanks for the hint with the ObjectOutputStream, I almost forget about that one, I will definitely use it when I decide to serialize checkpoints to. And thanks for the info with the Memento pattern, that's what I was originally looking for. But it sounds like a huge load of work to implement afterwards, do you think my idea of just copying everything would work out too (there are like max. 50 mutable objects on screen; excluding particles which I will have to do differently). (Note: I just failed and deleted the wrong comment, so I re-post this one, sorry) – flotothemoon Jun 6 '15 at 15:37

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