17

There is a popular spin-lock mutex version which is spreaded across the Internet and which one might encounter in the Anthony Williams book(C++ Concurrency in Action). Here it is:

class SpinLock
{
    std::atomic_flag locked;
public:
    SpinLock() :
        locked{ATOMIC_FLAG_INIT}
    {
    }
    void lock() 
    {
        while(locked.test_and_set(std::memory_order_acquire));
    }
    void unlock() 
    {
        locked.clear(std::memory_order_release);
    }
};

The thing I do not understand is why everybody uses std::memory_order_acquire for the test_and_set which is an RMW operation. Why is it not std::memory_acq_rel? Suppose we have 2 threads simultaneously trying to acquire a lock:

T1: test_and_set -> ret false
T2: test_and_set -> ret false

The situation should be possible since we have 2 acquire operations which don't form any sync with relationship between each other. Yes, after we have unlocked the mutex we have a release operation which heads a subsequent release sequence and life becomes colorful and everyone is happy. But why is it safe before the release sequence is headed?

Since many people mention exactly that implementation I suppose it should work correctly. So what am I missing?

UPDATE 1:

I perfectly understand that the operation is atomic, that operations between lock and unlock can't go out of the critical section. This is not a problem. The problem is that I don't see how the code above prevents 2 mutexes coming into the critical section simultaneously. To prevent it from happening there should be happens before relationship between 2 locks. Could someone show me, using the C++ standard notions, that the code is perfectly safe?

UPDATE 2:

Ok, we are close to the correct answer, I believe. I've found the following in the standard:

[atomics.order] clause 11

Atomic read-modify-write operations shall always read the last value (in the modification order) written before the write associated with the read-modify-write operation.

And on this major note I could happily close the question but I still have my doubts. What about in the modification order part? Standard is pretty clear about it:

[intro.multithread] clause 8

All modifications to a particular atomic object M occur in some particular total order, called the modification order of M . If A and B are modifications of an atomic object M and A happens before(as defined below) B, then A shall precede B in the modification order of M , which is defined below.

So according to that clause for an RMW operation to have the latest written value, the latest write operation should happen before the reading part or RMW operation. Which is not the case in the question. Right?

UPDATE 3:

I more and more think that the code for a spin lock is broken. Here is my reasoning. C++ specify 3 types of operations:

  • Acquire, release, acquire-release - these are sync ops.
  • Relaxed - these are no sync ops
  • RMW - these are operations with "special" characteristic

Let's start with RMW and find out what so special about them. First, they are a valuable asset in forming release sequence, second they have a special clause([atomics.order] clause 11) cited above. Nothing else special I found.

Acquire/release are sync ops and release sync with acquire so forming a happens before relationship. Relaxed operations are just plain atomics and don't participate in the modification order at all.

What we have in our code? We have an RMW operation which uses acquire memory semantics so whenever first unlock(release) is reached it serves 2 roles:

  1. It forms a sync with relationship with the previous release
  2. It participates in the release sequence. But that's all true only after the first unlock has finished.

Before that, if we have 2+ threads which are simultaneously running our lock code then we can enter pass the lock simultaneously since 2 acquire operations don't form any kind of relationship. They are as unordered as relaxed operations would. Since they are unordered we can't use any special clauses about RMW operations since there is no happens before relationship and hence no modification order for the locked flag.

So either my logic is flawed or code is broken. Please, whoever knows the truth - comment on this.

  • I have addressed your "update 2" in my answer. – davmac Jun 7 '15 at 20:05
  • Why is there no sleep(0) in the while loop. As written we do not yield at all while spinning so we will continue to spin until our time slice is up. The may lead to poor performance especially on single core machines. – doron Dec 2 '16 at 12:29
  • @doron, because this implementation is for showing how to use atomics not how to write good spin locks. Sure this implementation is naive but it never meant to be anything more. There is a yield function in C++ btw, so you need not use the sleep(0). – ixSci Dec 2 '16 at 12:31
12

Could someone show me, using the C++ standard notions, that the code is perfectly safe?

I initially had the same concerns as you. I think the key is understanding that operations on the std::atomic_flag variable are atomic with respect to all processors/cores. Two atomic 'test and set' operations in separate threads cannot simultaneously succeed, regardless of the memory ordering specified, since they then could not be atomic; the operation must apply to the actual variable, not a cached local copy (which is, I think, not even a concept in C++).

A full chain of reasoning:

29.7 p5 (talking about the test-and-set operation):

Effects: Atomically sets the value pointed to by object or by this to true. Memory is affected according to the value of order. These operations are atomic read-modify-write operations (1.10). Returns: Atomically, the value of the object immediately before the effects.

1.10 p6:

All modifications to a particular atomic object M occur in some particular total order, called the modification order of M ...

So, if as this case two threads attempt to lock the spinlock at the same time, one of them must be first and the other one second. We now just need to show that the second one will by necessity return that the flag was already set, thus preventing that thread from entering the critical section.

Paragraph 6 goes on to say:

... If A and B are modifications of an atomic object M and A happens before (as defined below) B, then A shall precede B in the modification order of M , which is defined below. [ Note: This states that the modification orders must respect the “happens before” relationship. — end note ]

There is no "happens before" relationship between the two test-and-set operations happening in the two threads, so we cannot determine which comes first in the modification order; however, due to the first sentence in p6 (which states that there is a total ordering), one must definitely come before the other. Now, from 29.3 p12:

Atomic read-modify-write operations shall always read the last value (in the modification order) written before the write associated with the read-modify-write operation.

This shows that the test-and-set ordered second must see the value written by the test-and-set ordered first. Any acquire/release choices do not affect this.

Therefore, if two test-and-set operations are performed "simultaneously", they will be given an arbitrary order, and the second shall see the flag value that was set by the first. As such the memory order constraints specified for the test-and-set operation do not matter; they are used to control ordering of writes to other variables during the period where the spinlock is acquired.

Response to "Update 2" of the question:

So according to that clause for an RMW operation to have the latest written value, the latest write operation should happen before the reading part or RMW operation. Which is not the case in the question. Right?

Correct that there is no "happen before" relationship, but incorrect that an RMW operation needs such a relationship in order to be guaranteed the latest written value. The statement you list as "[atomics.order] clause 11" does not require a "happens before" relationship, just that one operation is before the other in the "modification order" for the atomic flag. Clause 8 states that there will be such an order, and it will be a total ordering:

All modifications to a particular atomic object M occur in some particular total order, called the modification order of M ...

... it then goes on to say that the total ordering must be consistent with any "happens before" relationships:

... If A and B are modifications of an atomic object M and A happens before (as defined below) B, then A shall precede B in the modification order of M, which is defined below.

However, in the absence of a "happens before" relationship, there is still a total ordering - it's just that this ordering has a degree of arbitrariness. That is, if there is no "happens before" relationship between A and B, then it is not specified whether A is ordered before or after B. But it must be one or the other, because there is a particular total order.

Why is memory_order_acquire needed, then?

A mutex such as a spinlock is often used to protect other, non-atomic variables and data structures. Using memory_order_acquire when locking the spinlock assures that a read from such variables will see the correct values (i.e. the values written by any other thread that previously held the spinlock). For the unlock, memory_order_release is also needed in order to allow other threads to see the written values.

The acquire/release both prevent the compiler from re-ordering reads/writes past the acquisition/release of the lock, and ensure that any necessary instructions to ensure appropriate levels of cache coherency are generated.

Further evidence:

First, this note from 29.3:

Note: Atomic operations specifying memory_order_relaxed are relaxed with respect to memory ordering. Implementations must still guarantee that any given atomic access to a particular atomic object be indivisible with respect to all other atomic accesses to that object. — end note

This is essentially saying that the memory ordering specified does not affect the atomic operation itself. The access must "be indivisible with respect to all other atomic accesses" including those from other threads. To allow two test-and-set operations to read the same value would effectively be dividing at least one of them, so that it was no longer atomic.

Also, from 1.10 paragraph 5:

In addition, there are relaxed atomic operations, which are not synchronization operations, and atomic read-modify-write operations, which have special characteristics.

(A test-and-set falls into this latter category) and especially:

“Relaxed” atomic operations are not synchronization operations even though, like synchronization operations, they cannot contribute to data races.

(emphasis mine). A case where two threads both simultaneously executed an atomic test-and-set (and both performed the 'set' part) would be such a data race, so this text again indicates that this cannot happen.

1.10 p8:

Note: The specifications of the synchronization operations define when one reads the value written by another. For atomic objects, the definition is clear.

It means one thread reads the value written by another. It says that for atomic objects the definition is clear, meaning that no other synchronisation is necessary - it is enough to perform the operation on the atomic object; the effect will be seen immediately by other threads.

In particular, 1.10 p19:

[ Note: The four preceding coherence requirements effectively disallow compiler reordering of atomic operations to a single object, even if both operations are relaxed loads. This effectively makes the cache coherence guarantee provided by most hardware available to C ++ atomic operations. — end note ]

Note the mention of cache coherence even in the presence of relaxed loads. This clearly shows that the test-and-set can only succeed in one thread at a time, since for one to fail either cache coherence is broken or the operation is not atomic.

  • I disagree. I don't understand why are you all talking about atomicity while it is completely irrelevant here. "access to a particular atomic object be indivisible with respect to all other atomic accesses to that object" - just guarantees that you can't see partly written object in the different thread. That's all. It doesn't state that if the variable is set than it will be visible in the other thread any time soon. Only happens before relationship guarantees it. And we don't have it in the question. – ixSci Jun 7 '15 at 12:49
  • So first thread make t-a-s, writing the flag variable to the write buffer, and the second thread makes the same. Effectively they both entering the critical section. What would stop them from doing it? Correct behavior is not achievable without memory barrier, but according to the answers we could even used relaxed objects which doesn't produce barriers at all. Why so much fuss about the whole execution model then? – ixSci Jun 7 '15 at 12:50
  • ""access to a particular atomic object be indivisible with respect to all other atomic accesses to that object" - just guarantees that you can't see partly written object in the different thread. That's all." - but the test-and-set operation is itself atomic. From 29.7 p5: "Effects: Atomically sets the value pointed to by object or by this to true. Memory is affected according to the value of order. These operations are atomic read-modify-write operations (1.10)." – davmac Jun 7 '15 at 13:49
  • 1
    @ixSci "all this atomic stuff is really irrelevant" - it's not, because "atomic" implies cache coherence, that is, a change of an atomic flag is seen immediately in other threads. See 1.10p19 (I've amended the answer to include the text) – davmac Jun 7 '15 at 16:07
  • 2
    @ixSci it's clear, right there in the text: All modifications to a particular atomic object M occur in some particular total order, full stop. You can't just claim that the existence of this ordering requires a happens-before. Yes, I split the clause in half, but only because the 1st sentence applies to your example whereas the rest does not. The remainder of the clause is there to enforce that if there is a happens before relationship, the total ordering respects it. There is even a note which says as much. – davmac Jun 8 '15 at 8:17
14

I think what you're missing is that test_and_set is atomic, period. There is no memory ordering setting that makes this operation not atomic. If all we needed was an atomic test and set, we could specify any memory ordering.

However, in this case, we need more than just an atomic "test and set" operation. We need to ensure that memory operations we performed after we confirmed that the lock was ours to take aren't re-ordered to before we observed the mutex to be unlocked. (Because those operations won't be atomic operations.)

Consider:

  1. Some reads of data not protected by the mutex.
  2. Some writes to data not protected by the mutex.
  3. We try to lock the mutex.
  4. We see the mutex as locked and fail to lock it.
  5. We see the mutex as unlocked and atomically lock it.
  6. Some reads of data protected by the mutex.
  7. Some writes to data protected by the mutex.

What is the one thing that must not happen? It's that the reads and writes in step 6 and 7 somehow get re-ordered to before step 5, stepping on another thread accessing shared data under protection of the mutex.

The test_and_set operation is already atomic, so steps 4 and 5 are inherently safe. And steps 1 and 2 can't modify protected data (because they occur before we even try to lock) so there's no harm in re-ordering them around our lock operation.

But steps 6 and 7 -- those must not be re-ordered to prior to us observing that the lock was unlocked so that we could atomically lock it. That would be a catastrophe.

The definition of memory_order_acquire: "A load operation with this memory order performs the acquire operation on the affected memory location: no memory accesses in the current thread can be reordered before this load."

Exactly what we need.

  • 1
    "so steps 4 and 5 are inherently safe" no they are not. Atomic means indivisible writing and nothing else. They are no inherently safe. Other threads might still see old values. To add more "logic" all this sync with stuff were invented. Please, see the update to the question. – ixSci Jun 7 '15 at 9:32
  • I guess the implicit assumption (which I think holds) is that an atomic 'test_and_set' operation also has a visible effect on other cores. Threads on the same core should see memory absolutely identical. Sometimes additional syncing is needed when haveing core local cache. – Jonas Wolf Jun 7 '15 at 9:44
  • 1
    @DavidSchwartz I understand that the "test and set" is atomic, the question is what it is testing. Without memory_order_acquire (as in OP's code) it could test a value in the core's cache rather than the value in memory. But without making it a release operation, the set part of the operation might not be visible to other cores even though they use memory_order_acquire. If, as you seem to believe, the test-and-set always bypasses the local cache, what is the purpose of using memory_order_acquire (and later memory_order_release) in the sample code? – davmac Jun 7 '15 at 10:34
  • 1
    @DavidSchwartz see my comment above - "Wait, I think I understand now. The acquire/release orderings are for writes/reads that occur to other memory while the spinlock is held?" From 29.3: Atomic operations specifying memory_order_relaxed are relaxed with respect to memory ordering. Implementations must still guarantee that any given atomic access to a particular atomic object be indivisible with respect to all other atomic accesses to that object - this completely supports your answer, which I've now upvoted. – davmac Jun 7 '15 at 10:59
  • 1
    My investigation led me to the conclusion that you are right and I'm wrong. Thank you for the discussion because it helped me much - it shaked my conviction :) I set +1 to this post and marked @davmac's post as an answer because his post have more C++ish info for the subject and it is good for those who later stumble onto this post. Thank you guys, I eradicated one silly misunderstanding. – ixSci Jun 8 '15 at 16:30
1

As you said, test_and_set is a RMW operation. However, for testing it is only important that the correct value is read. Thus, memory_order_acquire seems sufficient.

See also table Constants in http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/atomic/memory_order

  • That I know. I don't understand why people use std::memory_order_acquire – ixSci Jun 7 '15 at 7:51
  • You are right. I didn't read your question thoroughly enough. Please have a look at my edited answer. – Jonas Wolf Jun 7 '15 at 8:05
  • I don't see how we can assert that correct value is read while we have 2 unordered operations. As far as I understand 2 acquire operations are no more related than 2 relaxed operations. Both operations do writing and neither syncs with another. – ixSci Jun 7 '15 at 8:14
  • Another try (sorry, I find it hard to explain): For a lock operation, you need test_and_set operation. The test_and_set operation is usually atomic. So the only thing we need to ensure is that memory writes prior to test_and_set are not reordered. "This ensures that all writes in other threads that release the same atomic variable are visible in the current thread." So, if one thread has acquired the lock, the "test" operation in the other threads "fail" and do not lead to a set, because the write is definitely visible there. – Jonas Wolf Jun 7 '15 at 8:24
  • Can you write what do you mean in C++ standard terms? Because I still don't why we have any guarantees here. Let test_and_set(std::memory_order_acquire) be operation A in T1 and B in T2. Then I do not see any happens before relationship between them, they just don't form any as far as I understand. Standard aside: let these operations have read_barrers before execution. Both of them can put locked into write buffers of the corresponding CPUs and I don't see what prevents CPU from doing it provided we are giving only an acquire(aka read barrier) operation. – ixSci Jun 7 '15 at 8:31

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